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Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2011 with funding from 

LYRASIS IVIembers and Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/athletethe196667unse 






Hiqh School AthMe 



PAUL G. BLAZER HIGH SCHOOL 

BASEBALL TEAM 

K.H.S.A.A. CHAMPION— 1966 




(Left to Right) Front Row: S. Hemlepp, J. Conley, B. Workman, D. 
Stevens, B. Lynch, M. Smith. Second Row: Coach J. Eckhart, Mgr. D. 
Dove, T. Russell, T. Wright, J. Thomas, S. Gerrard, D. Lentz, R. Miranda, 
Mgr. T. Burnette, Coach Z. Meyers. Third Row: Mgr. R. Evans, D. Detjen, 
J. Sieweke, B. Lynch, W. Workman, E. Childers, B. Eckhart, Mgr. C. Steil. 



Official Organ of tlie 

KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION 

_,^^_____^ August, 1986 



KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL TRACK MEET ^ CLASS AAA 

LOUISVILLE, KENTUCKY, MAY 21, 1966 
Louisville Male High School Track Team — K.H.S.A.A. Champion 1966 




(Lefc to Kigiit) T. iteil, t\ Jackson. K. Carpenter. B. liaker. oirecter rt. Dorsey. J. K.nzer. Coach J. Conn, Coach M. Long- 
acre. J. Locke. C. Morris. W. Green, Capt. R. Brown, P. Nelson, D. Hess, .1. Riley, R. Dean, Prin. F. Sanders. 



103 Yard Dash— 

1. Brown-Male 

2. Glass-St. Xavier 

3. Cunninghani-Easteni 
3. Locke-Male 

5. Borne-St. Xavier 

Time 9.7 

Brown set a new state record with hi.'^ 
time of 9.7. 

220 Yard Dash— 



Brown-Male 

Smith-Shawnee 

Bufkin-Trinity 

Ball-Valley 

Bloom-Westporl 



3. Scharein-Shawnee 

4. Swain-Shawnee 

5. Goff-Bishop David 

Time4:20.2 
120 Yard High Hurdles— 

1. Ball-Valley 

2. Riley-Male 

3. Nor;hington-Thos. Jefferson 

4. Kleier-St. Xavier 

5. Woitzel-Trinity 



130 Yard Low Hurdles— 



Time-14.4 



Time-21.9 



440 Yard Dash— 

1. Smith-Shawnee 

2. Simpson-Westport 

3. Malloy-Bishop David 

4. Bell-Male 

5. Colbert-Seneca 

Time48.9 

Smith set a new state record with his 
time of 48.9. 

880 Yard Run— 

1. Price-Trinity 

2. Weber-Bishop David 

3. Baumer-Durrett 

4. Norris-Flaget 

5. Anderson-St. Xavier 

Time-1:56.9 
Mile Run— 

1. Kleier-Atherton 

2. Weis-St. Xaviei 



Ball-Valley 
Riley-Male 
Kleier-St. Xavier 
Weitzel-Trinity 
Kinzer-Male 









Time-19.5 


Ball 


set 


a new state record with his 


time 


of 


19..5. 




883 


Yard Relay— 






1. 


Male 






2. 


Trinity 






3. 


Manual 






4. 


St. Xavier 






5. 


Thomas Jefferson 








Time-1:30.7 


2 Mile 


Run— 






1. 


Finegan-Flagel 






2. 


Theis-Westport 






3. 


Zorn-St. Xavier 






4. 


Blandford-DeSales 




5. 


Kelty-Trinity 


Time-9:42.9 



Finegan set a new state record with 
his time of 9:42.9. 

Mile Relay— 

1. Male 

2. St. Xavier 

3. Shawnee 

4. Westport 

5. Bishop David 

Time-3:20.8 

Male set a new state record with the 
time of 3:20.8. 

Shot PuJ— 

1. Cross-Central 

2. Smith-Valley 

3. Moore-DeSales 

4. Baker-Male 

5. McMenamin-Atherton 

Distance-57' 6" 
Po!e Vault- 

1. Vogt-Manual 

2. Hess-Male 

2. Lawrence-Seneca 

4. Metzger-St. Xavier 

5. Heuser-Pleasure Ridge 
5. Rogers-Seneca 

Height-12' 0" 

High Jump^ 

1. Hance-Eastem 

2. Thompson-Seneca 

3. Loche-Male 

4. Marris-Male 

4. Northington-Thos. Jefferson 
HeigM-6' 5" 
(Continued on Page Eight I 



The Kentucky High School Athlete 

Official Organ of the 

Kentucky High School Athletic Association 



VOL. XXIX— NO. 1 



AUGUST, 19B6 



$1.00 Per Year 



Report Of Audit 

1191 East Broadway 
Lo^jisville 4. Kentucky 
Julv 15. 1466 
Mr. Theodore A. Sanford, Secretary & Tr^lsurer 
Kentucky Hifrh School Athletic Association 
Lexingrton, Kentucky 
Sir: 

We have examined the Statements of Receipts and Disburse- 
ments of the Kentucky High School Athletic Association for the 
year ended June 30, 1966. Cash in Banks. Savings Accounts and 
Bond Investments were verified by direct communication with 
depositors. Buildings and equipment are reflected at estimated 
values without appraisal by us. 

In our opinion the accompanying statements present fairly 
the financial position of the Kentucky High School Athletic 
Association at June 30, 1966, and the results of its operation 
for the year then ended, subject to the estimated value of 
buildings and equipment, in conformity with generally accepted 
accounting principles applied on a basis consistent with that 
of the preceding year. 

Johnson and Lusk 

Certified Public Accountants 

KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION 

PERIOD FROM JULY 1, 19&5 TO JUNE 30, 1966 

STATEMENT OF 

RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS 

RECEIPTS: 

Balance in checking Account July 1, 1965 $ 43,057.28 

.\nnual Dues: 382 i<; $3.00 $ 1,146.00 

Officials' Dues : 

Football: 524 in $3.00 1,572.00 

Basketball: 1324 (a $3.00 3,972.00 

Baseball: 112 «i $3.00 336.00 

Reciprocity Officials: 

Football: 55 m $1.00 55.00 

Basketball: 43 M $1.00 43.00 

Officials' Fines: 22 m $5.00 110.00 

Redeposits (Bad Checks Made Good) — 45.00 

Advertisingr in Magazine 1,515.00 

Sale of Publications 520.00 

Sale of Equipment 50.00 

Sale of Bonds 2,500.00 

Ticket Sales — Annual Meeting 607.50 

Interest Received from 

Government Bonds 2,134.30 

Interest Received from 1st Fed. Savings 

& Loan Ass'n. 285.00 

Interest Received from Union Fed. 

Savings & Loan Ass'n. 400.00 

Interest Received from Lexington 

Fed. Savings & Loan Ass'n. 412.00 

Transferred from 1st Fed. Savings 

& Loan Ass'n. 6,000.00 

Transferred from State Basketball 

Tournament Account 127,289.05 

Refunds 118.95 

Receipts — State Baseball Tournament 1,339.00 

Football Playoffs 

A & AA Ticket Sales 9,205.50 

AAA Profit 4,873,95 

A & AA Program Profit , 514.96 

A & AA Program State Tax 9.92 

AAA Radio Fee 100.00 

Receipts — State Track Meet 1,084.86 

Receipts — State Wrestling Tournament _ 484.00 

Receipts — State Swim Meets 607.60 $167,331.47 

$2To,388.75 
DISBURSEMENTS: 

Board of Control Expense $ 6,112.49 

Commissioner's Salary (Base Sal. $15,000.00) 11,903,72 

Expense — Commissioner's Office 512.10 

Ass't. Commissioner's Salary (Base Sal. $13,000.00) 10,184.64 

Travel Expense — Ass't. Commissioner 853.25 

Secretarial Salaries 9,291.24 

Janitor's Salary 1,190.32 

Postage 2,182.24 

Office Supplies 647.47 

New Equipment 842.59 

Janitor Supplies 61.41 







1.303.38 


Equipment Repairs & Service Contracts — 
Utilities _ 




191.77 
1.130.62 






1,477,32 






44.00 






2,942,77 


Appropriation to Kentucky Coaches Ass'n. 

Appropriation to K.A.P.O.S. 

Purchase of National Federation Publications 

Delegates to National Federation Meetings 


500.00 

300.00 

2,965.70 

3,106,83 

130.75 


Appropriation to Kentucky D.G.W.S. 




oOO.OO 
170.00 


Audit 




140.00 


Bad Checks 




58.00 






89.08 






2,570.75 


Speaker — Annual Banquet 
T:.xes and Withholdings: 

Federal Income Tax Withheld ___$ 


5,633.40 
2,147.38 
726.46 
926.28 
451.50 
542.63 


100.00 


City Income Tax Withheld 

State Income Tsix Withheld 

Hospitalization Withheld 




State Sales and Use Taxes 

Transfer of Funds: 


10.427.65 
6,000.00 






21,796.00 


Magazine: 

Printing and Engravings 


4,904.56 
160.00 

1,431,42 

123.24 
1.883.13 

225.38 
1.172.83 

743.68 

890.28 
360.08 

2.078.55 

270.86 

1,577.95 
507.60 
668.40 

1,132.25 

2,336,99 

156.70 

680.24 

5,526.44 

89.47 

1,187.31 

6,401.37 

333.73 
35.00 

2,089.05 
2,020,71 

291,64 
73.94 

758.40 
1.431.00 

70.00 


5,064.56 


Officials' Division: 

Honorariums and 

Expenses — Clinics 

Printing and 

Miscellaneous Expense 

Schools for Officials 

Expenses — Regional Clinics 


4.836.00 


Swimming: 

State Commtitee Expense 

Trophies and Medals 








Mileage and Local 

Entertainment (State Meets) — 
Pool Rental & 


4,343.43 


Golf: 

Mileage and Local 

Entertainment (State 

Tournament) 

Trophies and Awards 


2,753.93 


Tennis 

Mileage and Local Entertainment 








Expenses — Tournament Managers 
Track : 

Regional Expenses 

Trophies and Medals 

State Committee Expense 

Officials 


3,625.94 


Mileage & Local Entertainment 
(State Meets) 

Miscellaneous Expenses 
(State Meets) 




Labor (State Meets) 


14,253.56 


Baseball: 

Refunds on District 








Refunds on Regional 




Baseballs (State Tournament) 

Transportation 

(State Tournament) 




Meals (State Tournament) 

Ticket Sellers & Takers 
(State Tournament) 





( Continued on Page Six ) 



Page Two 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR AUGUST, 1966 



AUGUST 1966 



VOL. XXIX— No. 1 



Pablished monthly, except June and July, by the Kentucky 

Hieh School Athletic Association 

Office of Pablication, Lexin^on, Ky. 49501 

Second class postasre paid at Lexinirton. Kentucky. 

Editor THEO. A. SANFORD 

Assistant Editor J. B. MANSFIELD 

Lexington, Ey. 
BOARD OF CONTROL 

President Sherman Gish (1963-67). Greenville 

Vice-President Don Davis (1963-67), Independence 

Directors — Morton Combs (1964-68). Carr Creek: Ralph C. 
Dorsey (1966-70). Horse Cave; Preston Holland (1965-69), 
Murrav: Don R. Rawlings (1965-69). Danville: Foster J. 
Sanders (1966-70). Louisville: Oran C. Teater (1964-68). 
Paintsville. 

Snbscription Rate $1.00 Per Tear 

jE'iom the Commlssionei s L/ffice 

Football Clinics 

The 1966 clinics for football officials and coaches 
will be conducted by Athletic Director Edgar McNabb, 
Assistant Principal of the Beechvvood High School, 
South Fort Mitchell. Mr. McNabb has been the 
K.H.S.A.A. representative on the National Federation 
Football Committee for several years. The dates and 
sites of the clinics are as follows: August 6, Paul G. 
Blazer High School, Ashland, 7:30 P.M.; August 9, 
Prestonsburg High School, 7:30 P.M.; August 10, 
Hazard High School, 1:30 P.M.; August 10, Bell High 
School. Pineville, 7:30 P.M.; August 15, Reser\'oir Hill, 
Rec. Center, Bowling Green, 7:30 P.M.; August 16, 
Mayfield High School, 7:30 P.M.; August 17, Hender- 
son High School, 7:30 P.M.; August 21, Newport High 
School, 2:30 P.M.; August 23, Phoenix Hotel, Lexing- 
ton, 7:30 P.M.; August 24, Kentucky Hotel, Louisville, 
7:30 P.M. 

Registration of Officials 
Football and basketball officials previously regis- 
tered have received their renewal application cards 
for the 1966-67 school year. One hundred seventy-eight 
officials failed to file their 1965-66 reports on or before 
the deadline set by the Board of Control for the sub- 
mitting of reports, and it was necessary to impose 
fines on these officials who failed to comply with 
Association rules. It is an Association requirement 
that each registered official attend the clinic in the 
sport in which he is registered. Eight football officials 
and thirty-nine basketball officials were suspended in 
1965-66 for failure to attend clinics. 

Attention, Principals ! 

Each principal of a K.H.S.A.A. member school will 
be supplied during the forthcoming school year with a 
card which will say: "Kentucky High School Athletic 
Association — This will introduce (name of principal), 
(name of school)." The card will be signed by the 
Commissioner. Most administrators of Association 
member schools admit to their home contests fellow 
administrators as a matter of school policy. However, 
many times these visitors hesitate to identify them- 
selves to the ticket talkers. The card mentioned will 
assist in this identification. 

The identification card may be used for admission 
to all events at the state level except the State Basket- 
ball Tournament. A different plan for issuing these 
passes, along with passes to the district and regional 
basketball tournaments, is provided in basketball tour- 
nament regulations. 

The identification cards are not to be considered 
as regular season passes to all home games of each 
member school holding membership in the Associa- 
tion. School policy should be the determining factor in 
presenting the cards for admission to the games. 



In Memoriam 




John A. Dotson 

Dr. John A. Dotson, academic vice president and 
first dean of the graduate studies program at Union 
College, died on April 19 at Knox County General Hos- 
pital. Death was due to a heart attack. He was 71. 

Dr. Dotson was one of the most distinguished edu- 
cators to serve in the Kentucky educational system, 
having taught in Kentucky schools over thirty years. 
He was a native of Versailles, Kentucky, and received 
his baccalaureate degree from Georgetown College. He 
received his doctorate from George Peabody College 
after attending the University of Kentucky and the 
University of North Carolina graduate schools. He was 
Superintendent of Benham City Schools for some 
twenty years, during which time (1936-43) he was a 
member of the K.H.S.A.A. Board of Control. 

From 1944 to 1947, Dr. Dotson was head of curri- 
culum for the Louisville Board of Education. In 1947 
he left to become director of teacher education at 
Emory University in Atlanta, Georgia. He served as 
dean of the University of Georgia College of Education 
before taking the post as head of graduate studies at 
Union in 1962. He was professor emeritus at the Uni- 
versity of Georgia. 

Dr. Dotson was considered "Mister C^irriculum" of 
the Southern Association of Schools and Colleges. He 
had conducted education workshops at University of 
Kentucky and at Emory, and had served as curriculum 
consultant for schools owned by the Methodist Church. 

Dr. Dotson was a member of such education or- 
ganizations as Pi Gamma Mu. a social science hon- 
orary fraternity; The National Society for the Study 
of Education, Phi Delta Kappa, Kappa Delta Pi, Kappa 
Phi Kappa, and a life member of the National Educa- 
tion Association. In addition he was a Mason and a 
member of Rotary Club and Alpha Phi Omega. 

Funeral services were held at Conway Boatman 
Chapel on Friday, April 22, at 10 a. m. with Dr. John 
Owen Gross, retired executive secretary of the Board 
of Education of the Methodist Church, Nashville, Ten- 
nessee, former president of Union College, and the 
Rev. M. A. Reese, pastor of the Barbourville First 
Baptist (2!hurch, officiating. Active pallbearers were: 
Dr. John H. Boyd, Dr. J. Howard Allen, Charles Sad- 
dler, Dr. Jesse D. Lay, Warren Robbins, and Curtis 
Mathis. Department heads at Union were honorary- 
pallbearers. 

Interment was in Bellevue Cemetery at Danville, 
Kentucky, with the Sharpsburg, Kentucky Masonic 
Lodge in charge of services. 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR AUGUST, 1966 



Page Three 



Survivors are his widow, Mattie Adams Dotson; 
one brother, James Dotson, Long Beach, Calif.; four 
sisters: Mrs. Clarence Lowen, Louisville, Ky.; Mrs. 
Victor Harris, North Middletown, Ky.; Mrs. Donald 
Burdette, Kansas City, Missouri; and Mrs. Anna Box- 
ley, Hopkinsville, Ky. 

The impact of Dr. John A. Dotson on thousands 
of men and women in Appalachia, in the state of Ken- 
tuccky, and throughout the South can never be ade- 
quately determined. Never ready to "retire", when he 
had finished his years at University of Georgia he 
came back to his beloved mountains and to Union 
College, which he loved so well, and here he gave the 
fullest measure of devotion and knowledge. Union 
College has lost a vice president, and a dean of grad- 
uate studies, but most of aU thousands who were 
touched by his life have lost a friend. 

— C. F. S. 



Owensboro High Wins Rifle Championship 




(Left to Right) Front Row: M. Wells, R. Eaton, T. Tate. 
Second Row: B. Depp. J. Bartlett, Col. Alcorn, Coach J. Rol- 
lins, B. Ham. 

The Owensboro High School won the 1966 State 
Rifle Tournament sponsored by the Kentucky High 
School Athletic Association. The Owensboro team, led 
by Jeff Bartlett, with the high individual score of 284, 
registered the highest score in the five-year history 
of the meet. The team score was 1392. 

Eleven teams competed in the tournament. K.M.I. 
was second in scoring with 1316, and Henry Clay was 
third with 1306. 

The tournament, which was held at the University 
of Kentucky, was managed by Captain Ronald W. 
Sdhuette, US Army ROTC Detachment. Chief Range 
Officer was Steven L. Johnston, and M/Sgt. Herbert 
C. Large was Chief Statistical Officer. 

Team and individual scores were as follows: 

Owensboro (13921 — Bartlett, 284; Depp, 282; Tate, 
279; Ham, 270; Eaton, 277. 

Kentucky Mihtary Institute (1316) — Burke, 269; 
Wilson, 261; Morrison, 267; Cundiff, 248; Thomas 271. 

Heniy Qay (1306)— Craft, 264: Porter, 256; Fades, 
257; WiUmott, 262; Jones, 267. 

Louisville Male (1296) — Thompson, 255; Shobe, 
261; Curry, 273; Merritt, 255; Myers, 252. 

Paul G. Blazer (1291)— Gardner, 283; Waugh, 257; 
Sloan, 239; Huston, 264; Fannin, 248. 

Millersburg Military Institute (1272) — Breene, 275; 
Wolsin, 265; Marcum, 255; Homsby, 252; Knab, 225. 

McKell (1226)— Hamilton, 262; Potter. 244; Ratliff, 
244; Biggs, 256; Blankenship, 220. 



Oldham County (1070)— Manning, 162; Vogler, 186: 
Davis, 252; Jackson, 263; Chaudoin, 207. 

Western (Sinai) (1026) —Bryant, 211; Flynn. 175 
C. Casey, 229; Gritton, 209; K. Casey, 202. 

Fort Campbell (10161— R. Kerr, 234; K. Kerr, 129 
Sellers, 236; Wrenne, 203; Crawford, 214. 

Inez (677) — Moore, 206; Ward, 124; Fanning, 133 
RatUff, 103; Hopson, 111. 




VETTINER HONORED 

The K.H.S.A.A.'s Flying Dutchman has received 
many honors in the fields of recreation and athletics 
through the years, probably none greater than the 
citation which he received at French Lick, Indiana, on 
June 28, 1966, during the Annual Meeting of the Na- 
tional Federation of State High School Athletic As- 
sociations. 

National Federation Vice President John J. F. 
Ruddy presented a certificate to Mr. Vettiner which 
read: "The National Federation of State High School 
Athletic Associations nresents this Certificate of Merit 
to Charles Vettiner, Kentucky High School Athletic As- 
sociation, for outstanding services in the field of school 
athletics and in appreciation of notable contributions &i 
constructive thinking and achievement on the national 
level." 

In making the presentation to Mr. Vettiner, Mr. 
Ruddy gave the following tribute: "To CHARLES 
VETTINER to whom the National Federation expresses 
its appreciation for noteworthy contributions to inter- 
scholastic athletics as a representative of the Kentucky 
High School Athletic Association. Numerous nationwide 
innovations came as a result of Mr. Vettiner's leader- 
ship during his tenure as a member of the Basketball 
Rules Committee, in a state-wide system for basket- 
ball rules interpretation meetings, as a contributor to 
the improvement of basketball rules clinics throughout 
the United States and as a developer of officials' train- 
ing programs. Mr. Vettiner has regularly served sev- 
eral member state associations as conductor of state- 
wide basketball rules meetings for coaches and ot, 
ficails. His energy and his dedication to the game of 
basketball and excellent preparation has made him a 
valued rules interpreter. His influence has been felt 
throughout the country. In many states, his methods 
have served advantageously as guides for other groups. 
This high commendation is most deserved." 



Page I'oui 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR AUGUST, 1966 



The Flying Dutchman 




Dm you know that fifty State High 
School Athletic Associations and six affih- 
ated Canadian Provinces make up the 
National Federation of State High School 
Athletic Associations? 

Did you know that approximately 20,- 
000 schools and 9,200,000 pupils are repre- 
sented in the National Federation which is 
ably directed by the hard-working Cliff 
Fagan and his personable assistant, Dave 
Arnold ? 

When the executive heads and members 
of various Boards of Control met in June 
at French Lick, Indiana, the National Feder- 
ation had entered its forty-sixth year of 
existence, having been born on May 14, 
1920, at a meeting in Chicago. Take it from 
the Dutchman that this is a model conven- 
tion wherever it is held and this year was 
another winner with Commissioner Phil 
Eskew of Indiana and his assistant, Herman 
Keller, serving as hosts. The Dutchman 
doffs his fedora to the Indiana High School 
Athletic Association for an outstanding pro- 
gram of recreation and hospitality 

When the National Federation convenes 
in 1967 it will be in Hawaii. As the Dutch- 
man studied the physiques of Kentuckians 
Oran Teater, Ralph Dorsey, Ty Holland, Don 
Rawlings, Foster Sanders, Sherman Gish 
and Ted Sanford at French Lick, he tried 
to picture these chaps with leis adorning 
their necks as they do the hula on the white 
sands of Honolulu. To see such action it's 
worth a trip half way around the world, so 
the Dutchman will write this column next 
year on the sunny beaches of the Islands. 

The National Federation featured a 
number of Kentucky Colonels who weren't 
from Kentucky. Among these were Colonels 
Paul Landis and Harold Meyer of Ohio; 
Colonels Phil Eskew and Herman Keller of 
Indiana; Colonels Cliff Fagan. Doc Runyan 
and Dave Arnold of Illinois. If Sam Burke, 
the President of the National Federation. 
isn't a Kentucky Colonel he ought to be. 
Sam's a dandy ! 

Right now the Dutchman is getting- his 



programs ready for the annual School For 
Basketball Officials sponsored by the 
K.H.S.A.A. in Lexington on August 7th and 
8th. Edgar McNabb conducts his School For 
Football Officials just prior to this one. At 
French Lick the Dutchman learned that 
some of the other associations are sending 
observers to these training schools for offi- 
cials. All visitors are welcome to the 
sessions. 

Several new regional representatives 
joined the old heads at the Basketball 
School For Officials. From Bowling Green 
came Bob Gour; Prospect sent Hubert Lou- 
den and Walt Green came from Middlesboro. 
To round out the new representatives the 
City of Slemp in the 14th region was honor- 
ed when one of its favorite sons, Ken 
Loudy, was selected by the K.H.S.A.A. to 
train the officials in that region. 

The competition for the honor of being 
Game Guy of 1967 begins now. The interest 
you show in helping young men and women 
to enjoy sports in spite of physical handi- 
caps may result in happiness for youngsters 
who mig'ht otherwise be miserable. Send 
your story about the boy or girl who is 
overcoming a handicap to be an athlete to 
The Flying Dutchman at Jeffersontown. 
Kentuckians want to know about these 
courageous kids and we'll tell them in this 
column. 

The Corn Cob Pipe of Honor for this 
month goes to Middletown's John W. Trapp. 
It is hard to estimate just how much good 
John has done for people during his life- 
time. The Dutchman first met this human 
Dynamo when he was coaching at LaGrange 
in the thirties. John is always the gentle- 
man. Now the principal of Eastern High 
School in Jefferson County, he is a familiar 
figure _ at everv State Basketball Tourna- 
ment in 'his official capacity. They should 
have made a lot more like Johnnie Trapp 
before they threw the mold away. 

This summer saw additional playground 
and recreation programs spring up over 
Kentucky. More and more school superin- 
tendents are encouraging summer play- 
ground programs. Oran Teater of Paints- 
ville brought his nlayground director to 
French Lick to study the recreation facili- 
ties there. 

It's QTOod to see more a-olf courses being 
built and the snort of ffolf being promoted 
bv the K.H.S.A.A. because it is a sport 
families mav play together and has imnor- 
tant carry-over value into later life. The 
Dutchman nlaved eighteen holes with Tom 
Wilds, an eighty-three vear old Louisvillian, 
who shot a score of 76. Golf makes it pos- 
(Continued on Page Sixteen) 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR AUGUST, 1966 



Page Fi\e 



Kentucky High School Baseball Tournament 

Sports Center, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky 



Paducah Tilghman (0) 





1 


Owensboro (1) 


r 


Valley (0) 


1- 
Shelby County (2) | 


Boone County 


(0) 




1 


Bowling Green 


(1) l- 


Middlesboro (1) 


Paul G. Blazer 


1 


(3) 1" 



June 8-9, 1966 



Owensboro (1) 





Shelby County H) 




Shelby County (3) 


Paul G. Blazer 1 2) 1 






Paul G. Blazer 
Champion 


1 Bowling Green (2) 


All-Tournament Team 
lb-Ron Ritter, Shelby County 
2b-Mike Smith, Paul G. Blazer 
3b-Bob Siddens, Bowling Green 
ss-M'ke Casey. Shelby County 
of-Bill Busey. Shelby County 
of-Ed Parish-Owensboro 
of-Jobie Miller. Shelby County 
c-Tom Oiler, Bowling Green 
p-Billy Lynch, Paul G. Blazer 
p-Wayne Greenwell, Owensboro 




Paul G. Blazer (3) 


1 





Thirty-Third Annual Kentucky High School Tennis Tournament 

Shawnee Park, Louisville, June 3-4, 1966 
SINGLES 



Wade-Lafayette 


QUARTER- 
FINALS 

Wade 
6-0; 6-0 


SEMI- 
FINALS 

Wade 
64; 6-3 




Ladd-Hopkmsville 
LoveU-Atherton 


Lovell 
(forfeit) 


FINALS 


Giiffith 
6-3; 6-3 






Wade 


Hayes-Shelbyville 


Curtis 
6-2; 6-0 


6-4; 6-2 






Jefferson-Mason County 


Nolan 
8-6; 6-1 


Curtis-Eastern 


Griffith 
6-2; 3-6; 6-0 


Fannin-Ashland 


Cooper 
6-0; 6-1 


Grlffith-Bellevue 


Cooper 
6-1; 6-0 


Cooper-Atiierton 


Leadh-Butler 


Glasser 
6-3; &4 


Bare-Owensboro 


Nolan 
6-3; 6-1 


Glasser-College 


Imhoff 
7-5; 6-2 


Imhoff-Seneca 
Ditty-Ashland 
Townes-St. Joseph 




Nolan 
6-2; 6-2 












Nolan-Aquinas 







Wade 
6-1; 6-4 



Page Six 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR AUGUST, 1966 



St. Xavicr 



Franklin Simpson 



Butler 



Henry Clay 



Waggener 



Somerset 



Owensboro 



BelloxTie 



DOUBLES 



SEMI- 
FINALS 

St. Xavier 
6-0; 6-3 



FINALS 





St. Xavier 
8-6; 6-3 




Henry Clay 
6-3; 4-6; 6-0 


Waggener 
4-6; 6-3; 12-10 




Waggener 
6-0; 6-0 


Waggener 
6-3; 2-6; 6-3 








Bellevue 
6-1; 6-3 







AUDIT 



(Continued from Page One) 

Lodging: (State Tournament) 700.00 

Public Address Announcers 40.00 

Scorer (State Tournament) 25.00 

Umpires (State Tournament) 446.14 

Expenses — Ass't. Manager 

(State Tournament) 90.00 

Groundsmen (State Tournament) — 60.00 
Miscellaneous Expenses — 

(State Tournament) 26.88 8,122.76 

K.H.S.A.A. Retirement Fund 5,000.00 

Cross Country: 

Mileage and Local Entertainment 

(State Meet) 865.80 

Trophies and Awards 1,011.31 

Expenses — Regional Meets 75.06 

Expenses— State Meet 66.30 2,018.47 

Football Playoffs: 

Printing 78.31 

Trophies and Awards 1,001.69 

Transportation 558.80 

Lodging 684.00 

Meals 1,671.00 

Field Rental — Refund 

on Labor 75.00 

Officials 280.00 

Ticket Sellers, Takers 

and Guards 309.00 

Miscellaneous 43,16 

P.A. Announcer 

& Scoreboard 30.00 

Insurance 35.00 

Statisticians 175.96 

Incidental Expenses- 
Board Grant 800.00 

Press Box Expenses 27.94 5,769.86 

Rifle Marksmanship : 

Mileage and Local Entertainment 

(State Tournament) 574.50 

Trophies and Awards 52.40 

Officials (State Tournament) __, 135.00 761.90 

Wrestling: 

Expenses — State Committee 185.37 

Trophies and Awards 

(State Tournament) 110.2.1 

Officials (State Tournament) ___ 270.00 
Mileage and Local Entertainment 

(State Tournament) 1,009.95 

Miscellaneous Expenses — 

(State Tournament) 370.22 

Printing 254.25 2,200.04 

Total Disbursements $158,776.58 

Receipts $210,388.75 

Disbursements $158,776.58 

Cash Balance $ 51,612.17 



BANK RECONCILEMENT 

Balance per Bank Statement. June 30, 1966 S 53,296.04 

Less Outstanding Checks 

No. 896 $ 266.25 

No. 913 32.50 

No. 929 14.70 

No. 968 14.10 

No. 977 31.90 

No. 1001 11.40 

No. 1019 22.05 

No. 1120 26.40 

No. 1122 68.80 

No. 1134 45.80 

No. 1147 64.33 

No. 1166 408.90 

No. 1168 36.00 

No. 1174 150.00 

No. 1194 45.15 

No. 1195 258.18 

No. 1196 155.94 

No. 1197 31.47 1,683.87 

True Bank Balance June 30, 1966 $ 51,612.17 

FUNDS ON HAND: 

Cash Balance— First Security 

National Bank & Trust Co. $ 51,612.17 

U. S. Savings Bonds 

(Value Juie 30, 19«6> ........ 86,667.50 

Savinqs Account — 1st Fed. 

Savings & Loan A;s'n. 10,000.00 

Savinqs Account —Union Fed. 

Savings & Loan Ass'n. ,-, 10,000.00 

Savinqs Account — Lexington Fed. 

Savings & Loan Ass'n. ... ,. 10,000.00 



Total Funds on Hand, June 30, 1966 ........ $168,279.67 

Estimated Value of K.H.S.A.A. 
Building and Equipment $ 99,900.00 

RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS 
1966 STATE BASKETBALL TOURNAMENT 
RECEIPTS: 

Ticket Sales 167,981.75 

Profit on Programs 4,100.52 

Radio and T.V. Fees 5,022.00 

Redeposits 16.00 $177,120.27 

DISBURSEMENTS: 

Printing $ 1,175.45 

Trophies and Awards 517.58 

Postage 250.00 

Insurance 1,381.00 

Incidental Expenses — ■ 

(16) Times ; 8,000.00 

Transportation 1,604.30 

Lodging 4,680.97 

Meals 6.834.24 

Coliseum Rental 9,000.00 

Organists 100.00 

(Continued on Page Thirteen) 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR AUGUST, 1966 



Page Seven 



ST. XAVIER GOLF TEAM IS BEST 




(Left to Right) M. Zimmerer, individual champion; T. Kalb- 
fleisch. Coach M. Donlon, C. Lally, P. Schnltz. 

The St. Xavier High School golf team won the 1966 
State Tournament, held at the Seneca Golf Course, 
Louisville, on May 24-25. Mike Zimmerer of St. Xavier 



captured individual honors. He and teammate Tom 
Kalbfleisch tied at 150, with Zimmerer winning on the 
first hole of a sudden-death playoff. 

Scores of the leading teams were: St. Xavier, 616; 
Springfield, 666; Oldham County, 672; Seneca, 674; 
Mayfield, 67S; Glasgow, 687; BowUng Green, 688; 
Owensboro, 689; Lafayette, 689. 

Individual scores of some of the tournament lead- 
ers were: 

150 — Zunmerer (St. Xavier), Kalbfleisch (St. 
Xavier) 

151 — Cadel (Middlesboro) 
153 — Schultz (St. Xavier) 

155 — Ford (DanviUe) 

156 — Simpson (Durrett) 

158 — Holton (Murray), Smith (Clark Co.) 

160 — Beck (Daviess Co.), Griffith (Lafayette) 

161 — Smith (Owensboro) 

162 — Ries (Beechwood), Walker (Seneca) 

163 — Lally (St. Xavier), Hindman (Springfield), 
Conklin (Seneca), Rice (Oldham Co.) 



Seventh Annual Kentucky High School Tennis Tournament For Girls 





Central Park, Louisville, June 3-4, 1966 






SINGLES 






QUARTER- 
FINALS 






Evans-Presentation 


1 Evans 


SEMI- 
FINALS 

Evans 
6-0: 6^ 


FINALS 


Bye 


Hale 




Hale-Russell 






1 7-5: 6-4 




Evans 


Bolton-Henry Clay 


1 




Maupin 




6-1: 6-0 


Maupin-BowUng Green 






1 6-2: 6-3 


Robinson 




Russell-Hart Memorial 


1 




Robinson 


64; 6-3 




Robinson-Eastern 






i 6-3: 6-2 


Miu-phy 
6-2; 6-1 


Murphy 
7-5: 7-5 


Sigler-Loretta 


Murphy 
"I (forfeit) 


Murphy-Breckinridge Trg. 


Cost-Hopkinsville 


j 

Rowlett 
"j 6-4: 6-3 


Taylor-Caverna 




Rowlett-Murray 


1 

Brown 


Brown-Somerset 






1 9-7: 6-3 


Brown 
6-1: eA 




Reker-Bellevue 


Sherman 


Gartner-BowUng Green 






1 6-4: 6-0 






Sherman-Holy Rosary 


1 



Evans 
6-1; 6-3 



Page Eight 


Tir 


lEK 


ENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL 


ATHLETE FOR AUGUST, 1966 


Murray 
Campbellsvile 


TENNIS 

SEMI- 
FINALS 

Campbellsville 
6-2; 6-4 


DOUBLES— GIRLS 
FINALS 




Franklin County 
6-2; 64 


i? ranKUn county 
6-3; 6-3 








Bellevue 










Franklin County 


Fort Knox 
7-5; 6-2 








Holy Rosary 




Presentation 
6-3; 6-0 










Fort Knox 


Presentation 
6-0; 6-0 


Presentation 
6-0; 6-0 








Russell 






Presentation 











K.H.S.A.A. TRACK MEET 

(Continued from Inside Front Cover) 

Long Jump — 

1. Brown-Male 

2. Pope-Eastern 

TOTAL POINTS 



3. Cunningham-Eastern 

4. Green-Male 

5. Thomas-DeSales 

Distance-23' 1" 



2. Pfeitfer-St. Xavier 

3. Mitchell-Flaget 

4. Costanzo-Eastern 

5. Jones-Valley 
Distance-164' 91/2' 



Male 55% 

St. Xavier S" 

Shawnee 24 

Valley 19 

Eastern ITVa 

Trinity 17 

Flaget 11 

Westport 11 

Minutes of Board Meeting 

The Board of Control of the Kentucky High School 
Athletic Association met at the K.H.S.A.A. office, Lex- 
ington, on Wednesday morning, June 8, 1966. The 
meeting was called to order by President Foster J. 
Sanders, with all Board members and Commissioner 
Theo. A. Sanford present. The invocation was given by 
President Sanders. 

Ralph C. Dorsey moved, seconded by Oran C. 
Teater, that the reading of the minutes of the April 
15th meeting be waived since members of the Board 
had received copies of the minutes. The motion was 
carried unanimously. 

The Coirmiissioner made a report to the Board on 
the estimated receipts and disbursements of the 
K.H.S.A.A. during tihe year 1965-66. He presented a 
suggested Association budget for the 1966-67 school 
year, with estimated receipts of $165,600.00, £md esti- 
mated disbursements of $165,150.00. After a study of 
various items of the proposed new budget, Don R. 
Rawlings moved, seconded by Oran C. Teater, that 
the 1966-67 budget presented by the Commissioner be 
adopted. The motion was cai-ried unanimously. 

The Commissioner presented the following recom- 
mended dhanges in tournament and meet regulations, 
calling for Board action: 

"1. Amend the second paragraph of Basketball 
Tournament Rule VI-B, to read as follows: 'Lodging, 
meals and passes shall be provided for five cheer- 
leaders and sponsor until their team has been elimi- 
nated. ' 

"2. Amend the second sentence of State Swimming 
Meet Rule XI, to read as follows: 'Awards will be 



Discus — 

1. Bouggess-Shawnee 

Manual ^ 

Seneca " 

Bishop David ^ 

Atherton ^ 

Central 6 

DeSales 6 

Thomas Jefferson ^Vz 

Durrett 3 

Pleasure Ridge Vs 



STATE CHAMPIONSHIP TENNIS TEAM 




(Left to Right) B. Creason. Coach R. Adams, D. DeMoss, 
players and coach state doubles championship team of the 
Waggener High School. (Inset) T. Wade, Lafayette, state 
singles champion. 

given to the first six finishing in each event.' 

"3. Amend the second sentence of State Golf 
Tournament Rule III, to read as follows: 'Eligible to 
enter the second round (boys) are the ten teams, and 
ten individuals not on quahfying teams, with the low- 
est scores after the first round.' 

"4. Substitute the following for Basketball Rule III- 
A: 'Only member schools having a schedule of twelve 
or more basketball games with at least six different 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR AUGUST, 1966 



Page Nine 



STATE WINNERS IN GIRLS' TENNIS 



&__: 




f 1 ' 


* ^ 



(Left to Right) D. Metzroth and S. Evans, State Doubles 
championship team of Presentation Academy. <Inset) N. 
Evans, of Presentation, state singles champion. 

member schools shall be allowed to vote for tourna- 
ment locations.' " 

Morion Combs moved, seconded by Sherman Gish, 
that the recommended changes in tournament and 
meet regulations, presented by the Conmiissioner, be 
adopted. The motion was carried unanimously. 

The Commissioner reported the results of a ques- 
tionnaire on Gymnastics, which the Board of Control 
had directed him earlier to send to the principals of 
K.H.S.A.A. member schools. He stated that twenty 
principals had indicated that their schools would send 
individual entries or teams to a regional or state Gym- 
nastics meet in 1966-67, and that thirteen others had 
stated that their schools would probably have teams 
the following year. On the basis of this information, 
Don Davis moved, seconded by Oran C. Teater, that 
the Commissioner be authorized to set up a Boys' 
Gymnastics program for the forthcoming 1966-67 school 
year, leading to regional and /or state meets. The mo- 
tion was carried unanimously. 

The Commissioner reported on the 1966 K.H.S.A.A. 
Track program, in which for the first time four 
classes had been involved, namely. Class A, Class AA, 
Class AAA, and Girls' Track. He stated that, in his 
opinion, the new plan had been most successful, and 
that the majority of school administrators and coaches 
approved of the current rules and regulations., Several 
Board members concurred with these statements. The 
Commissioner further stated that various suggestions 
had been made to liim for possible changes in the 
present plan, and that these suggestions would be 
given due consideration. 

There was a discussion concerning the possibility 
of setting up classes in Cross Country. It was sug- 
gested that the Commissioner send out a questionnaire 
concerning this matter to the principals of K.H.S.A.A. 
member schools with Cross Country teams. 

The Commissioner had been asked to make a 
survey of junior high school associations and organiza- 
tions for athletics in other states. He stated that he 
and iVIr. IMansfield had made such a survey. In thirty- 
nine state associations surveyed, tiiirteen had junior 
high school divisions and three were members of their 
respective associations. It was found that in most 
state association plans studied pupils at the junior 
high school level were not eligible to represent senior 
high schools on any teams. It was the opinion of the 
Commissioner that the many school system plans cur- 
rently in effect in Kentucky, namely, 6-6, 6-3-3, 8-4, 
9-3, etc., make the organization of a separate junior 
high school association or a K.H.S.A.A. junior high 
school division questionable at this time, keeping in 
mind the eUgibility of athletes at the junior high 
school level who might have the ability to play on 



varsity, junior varsity, or freshman teams represent- 
ing K.H.S.A.A. member schools. He further stated 
that some areas in the State have been successful in 
organizing city or county conferences and leagues, 
with their eligibility rules based on modified 
K.H.S.A.A. eligibility rules. It was suggested that the 
C;mmissioner formulate one or more suggested plans 
for junior high school organizations, these plans to 
serve as guidelines for school administrators at the 
junior high school level who might be interested in 
area conlerences or associations. 

Don Davis moved, seconded by Don R. Rawhngs, 
that all bilh of the Association for the period begin- 
ning April 1, 1966, and ending iVIay 31, 1966, be al- 
lowed. The motion was carried unanimously. 

There being no further business, the meeting was 
adjourned. 

FRANKFORT GIRLS' GOLF TEAM WINS 




(Left to Right) P. Tacliett, J. Long. Coach .1. Black, P. 
Harrod. D. Dailey. individual champion. 

The second K.H.S.A.A. State Golf Tournament for 
Girls was held at the Shawnee Golf Course, Louisville, 
on iVIay 24-25. The tournament was won by the Frank- 
fort High School team with a score of 824. Dianne 
Dailey cf Frankfort was individual wmner with a 
score of 171. The tournament was managed by IVIiss 
iVIatilda Walker of the Westport High School faculty. 

Eight full teams competed in the tournament, hav- 
ing qualified in regional competition. These teams and 
their scores were: Frankfort, 824; Bowling Green, 
826; CainpbeUsville, 848; Lafayette, 890; Valley, 940; 
Paul G. Blazer, 1070; Paintsville, 1141; Eastern, 443 
(first round score). 

Inciividual scores of some of the tournament lead- 
ers were: 

171 — Daily (Frankfort) 

173 — Beard (Campbellsville) 

175 — Rose (Eastern) 

183 — Orr (Bowling Green) 

189 — Wilson (Valley), Reynolds (Owensboro), 
Dickerson (Bowling Green) 

(Continued on Page Sixteen) 



Page Ten 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR AUGUST, 1966 



KENTUC^ Y HIGH SCHOOL TRA CK MEET-- GIRLS 

LEXINGTON, KENTUCKY, MAY 21, 1966 
Louisville Male High School Track Team — K.H.S.A.A. Champion 1966 




(Left to Right) Front Row: Advisor B. Long, D. Warner B. Smitli, Coach R. Curry. Second Row: M. Smith, J. Long, R. 
Smith, T. Watson, K. Barrow. Third Row: B. Stringer, C. Cooper. A. Day, J. Miles. Fourth Row: A. King, P. Silver, 
J. Burks, P. Wallace. 



50 



880 



50 



440 



Yard Hurdles— 


1. 


Smith-Male 


2. 


Hall-Boyle County 


3! 


Lennina-Ashland 


4. 


Harper-Paducah Tilghman 


5. 


Barnes-Oldham County 




Time-7.1 


Yard Run- 


1. 


Brown-Franklin-Simpson 


2. 


Ruble-Shelby County 


3^ 


Owens-Dunbar 


4. 


Corder-Lone Oak 


5. 


Bradley-Boyd County 




Time-2:27.7 


Yard Dash- 


1. 


Warner-Male 


2. 


Sleet-Boyle County 


3'. 


Flippin-RusselMlle 


4. 


Lusk-Paducah Tilghman 


5. 


Rogers-Bardsfown 




Time 6.2 


Yard Run — 


1. 


Brown-Franklin-Simpson 


2. 


Gregory-Paducah Tilghman 


3. 


Smith-Male 


4. 


Shields-Western 


0. 


Berry-Henderson County 



ICO Yard Dash— 

1. Warner-Male 

2. Sleet-Boyle County 

3. Simpson-Temple Hill 

4. KeUy-Ashland 

5. Johnson-North Hardin 

Time-11.4 
22a Yard Dash— 

1. Simpson-Temple Hill 

2. Smith-Male 

3. Sleet-Boyle County 

4. Ball-Valley 

5. Hocker-Owensboro 

Time 27.1 
70 Yard Hurdles— 

1. Ward-Owensboro 

2. Lenning-Ashland 

3. Horton-Eastem 

4. HaJl-Boyle County 

5. Bolt-Valley 



Time-10.3 



440 Yard Relay— 

1. Male 

2. Valley 

3. Paducah Tilghman 

4. Temple Hill 

5. Boyle Countj' 



Time-1:03.2 



Time-50.7 



880 Yard Medley Relay— 

1. Male 

2. Franklin-County 

3. Paducah Tilghman 

4. Owensboro 

5. Western 

Time 1:57.2 
Shor Put— 

1. Clark-Franklin County 

2. Krueger-Owensboro 

3. Watson-Paducah Tilghman 

4. Britt-Warren County 

5. Conn-Ashland 

Distance-34' 7%" 
Discus — 

1. Kruegar-Owensboro 

2. Britt-Warren County 

3. Conn-Ashland 

4. Allen-Harrison Co. 

5. Wooldridge-Durrett 

Distance-114' 2" 
High Jump — 

1. Ward-Owensboro 

2. Anderson-Paducah Tilghman 

3. Holmes-Eastern 

4. Clayton-Park City 

5. Vance-Western 

Height-5' 1%" 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR AUGUST, 1966 



Page Eleven 



Long Jump — 



Early-Valley 
Hocker-Owensboro 
Gassaway-Temple HDl 
Wyatt-North Marshall 
Flynn-La f ay ette 

Distance-15' 



101/2' 



Standing Broad Jump — Softball 

1. Wilford-Male 1. 

2. Nation-Owensboro 2. 

3. Sanders-Oldham County 3. 

4. Sturm-Ashland 4. 

5. Barker-Paducah Tilgkman 5. 

Distance-7' 8V2" 



Throw— 

Ward-Owensboro 
Grass e-Westport 
Hodge-Paducah Tilghman 
Scott-Adair County 
Murphy-Southern 

Distance-218' 6" 



TOTAL POINTS 



Male 43 

Owensboro 39 

Padacah Tilghman 25 

Boyle County 18 

Ashland 15 

Temple Hill 14 

Valley 13 

Franklin-Simpson 12 

Franklin County 10 

Eastern 6 

Warren County 6 

Oldham County 4 

Westport 4 



Western 4 

Shelby County 4 

Russellville 3 

Dunbar 3 

Adair County 2 

North Marshall 2 

Harrison County 2 

Lone Oak 2 

Bardstown 

Southern 

Lafayette 

North Hardin 

Durrett 

Henderson County 

Boyd County 



KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL TRACK MEET-CLASS AA 

LEXINGTON, KENTUCKY, MAY 21, 1966 
Paducah Tilghman High School Track Team- — K.H.S.A.A. Champion 1966 




(Left to Right) Front Row: Mgr. M. Johnson. D. Parham, D. Dotson, T. Gregory, L. Hammond. M. Khouri, C. Shaw, C. 
Newbern, R. Whiteside. B. Shulman. Second Row: Coach J. Major. J. Eaton, R. Golden. C. Barnette, W. Day, B. Page. H. 
Lee, Ass't. Coach J. Whiteley, J. Murphy, R. Morton. W. C. Young. E. Schlensker. K. Hunter, Trainer, S. Haley, Ass't. 
Coach R. Osteen. 



lOa Yard Dash— 

1. Moser-Boone County 

2. Best-K.M.L 

3. CoUmsworth-Ashland 

4. Pogue-Knox Central 

5. Hendley-Franklin-Simpson 

Time-10.0 
220 Yard Dash— 

1. Coleman-Owensboro 

2. Parham-Paducah Tilghman 

3. Moser-Boone County 

4. Chenault-Dunbar 



5. Collingsworth-Ashland 

Time-21.9 
44B Yard Dash— 

1. Prather-Lafayette 

2. Hennes-Paducah Tilghman 

3. Gallichio-Newport Catholic 

4. Moore-North Hardin 

5. Rideoui-Henderson 

Time-51.3 
880 Yard Run— 

1. Keller-Lexington Catholic 

2. Crooks-Highlands 



3. Page-Lone Oak 

4. Rivera-Fort Knox 

5. Slone-Prestonsburg 

Time-l:54.1 

Keller set a new state record with Ilia 
time of 1 :54.1. 

Mife Run— 

1. Remole-Owensboro 

2. Moore-Knox Central 

3. Hardin-Rowan County 

4. Rucker-Hohnes 

5. Harris, Elizabethtown 

Time-4:22.8 



Page Twelve 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR AUGUST, 1968 



2 Mile Run— 

1. Rankin-Somerset 

2. Shouse-Daviess County 

3. Bloyd-Greensburg 

4. Hhouri-Paducah Tilghman 

5. Loomis-Holmes 

Time-9:55.1 
120 Yard High Hurdles— 

1. Dern-Booiie Ct'unty 

2. Byars-Bourboii County 

'3. DL>tson-Paducah Tilghman 
4. Jacobs-Henderson County 

3. Clif tor; -Prijsionsburg 

Time-14.9 

189 Yard Low Hurdles— 

1. Jacobs-Hender3on County 

2. Byars-Bourbon County 

3. Dern-Boone County 

4. Dotson-Paducah Tilghman 

5. Sweat-Bowling Green 

Tiine-20.3 
880 Yard Re;ny— 

1. Paducah Tilghm-Ein 

2. Lafayette 





3. 


Taylor County 






4. 


Somerset 






5. 


Boyd County 








Time-i 


:31.1 


Mile 


Relay — 






1. 


Owensboro 






2. 


Paducah Tilghman 






3. 


Highlands 






4. 


Lafayette 






5. 


Bowling Green 








Time 3:22.6 


Shot 


Put— 






1. 


Simmons-Owensboro 






2. 


McClure-Mayfield 






3. 


Elias-Scott County 






4. 


Nilson-Boone County 






5. 


England-Glasgow 








Distance-58' 


9%" 


Simmons 


set a new state record 


with 


his distance of 58' 9%". 





Pole Vault— 

1. Swope-Daviess County 

2. Davis-Woodford County 

3. Atherton-LaRue County 

4. Johnson-Hopkinsville 



5. McFarland-St. Joseph 

Height-14' O;' 

Swope set a new state record with his 
height of 14' 0". 

High Jump — 

1. Farley-Elizabethtown 

2. Reed-Bryan Station 

3. Worth-Owensboro 

4. Price-Bowling Green 

5. Smith-Hazard 

Height-6' %" 
Long Jump— 

1. Talbott-Harrison County 

2. Page-Lone Oak 

3. McMannon-Newport Catholic 

4. Goodnite-Franklin-Simpson 

5. Williams-Middlesboro 

Distance-22' 0" 
Discus — 

1. Page-Paducaih Tilgihman 

2. Ziegler-Newport Catholic 

3. Elias-Scott County 

4. Pippin-Owensboro 

5. Bamett-Franklin Simpson 

Distance-141' 6" 



TOTAL POINTS 
Paducah Tilghman 31 

Owensboro 29 

Boone County 20 

Lafayette 12 

Newport Catholic 10 

Daviess County 10 

Bourbon County 8 

Henderson County 8 

Somerset 8 

Elizabethtown 7 

Lone Oak 7 

Highlands 7 

Lexington Catholic 6 

Scott County 6 

Knox Central 6 

Harrison County 6 

Ky. Military Inst. 4 

Ashland 4 

Franklin-Simpson 4 



Woodford County 4 

Bryan Station 4 

Bowling Green 4 

Mayfield 4 

Rowan County 3 

Holmes 3 

Taylor County 3 

LaRue County 3 

Greensburg 3 

Prestonsburg 2 

North Hardin 2 

Hopkinsville 2 

Fort Knox 2 

Dunbar 2 

Glasgow 1 

Boyd County 1 

Henderson 1 

St. Joseph 1 

Hazard 1 

Middlesboro 1 



KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL TRACK MEET — CLASS A 

LEXINGTON, KENTUCKY, MAY 21, 1966 



100 Yard Dash— 

1. Green-Eminence 

2. Davis ,M.M.I. 

3. Snow,-Lynch 

4. Rogers-Bardstown 

5. Wallace-Ballard Memorial 

Tune-9.7 

Green set a new state record with his 
time of 9.7. 

220 Yard Dash— 

1. Green-Eminence 

2. Davis-M.M.I. 

3. Snow-Lyndh 

4. Wallace-Ballard Memorial 

5. Henseley-Aquinas 

Time-21.6 

Green set a new state record with his 
time of 21.6. 

440 Yard Dash— 

1. Green-Eminence 

2. Davis-M.M.I. 

3. Bilbrey-Murray 

4. Woma<ii-Pridiard 

5. Frye-MonticeUo 

880 Yard Run— 

1. Rye-M.M.I. 



Time49.6 



2. Blevers-FIat Gap 

3. Yocum-Springfield 

4. Stedely-Providence 

5. Hendrix-London 

Time-2:03.9 
P/lile Run— 

1. Banks-M.M.I. 

2. Fields-Jenkins 

3. Catlett-Attucks 

4. Boblitt-Bardstown 

5. Holbrook-Morgan County 

Timfr4:38.4 
2 Mile Run— 

1. Hally-Sayre 

2. Pennington-Flat Gap 

3. Osbom-Attucks 

4. Upchurch-MonticeUo 

5. Gray-London 

Time-10:41.8 
120 Yard High Hurdles— 

1. Quarles-Attucks 

2. Owens-BeUevue 

3. Peake-Fleming-Neon 

4. Twyman-Metcalfe County 

5. Wilkins-M.M.I. 

Time-15.2 
130 Yard Low Hurdles— 
1. Quarles-Attucks 



2. Jones-Frankfort 

3. Tiemey-BeUevue 

4. Gray-Fleming Neon 

5. Smith-HiseviUe 

■Hme-BO.S 
880 Yard Relay— 

1. Attucks 

2. Bardstown 

3. M.M.I. 

4. Jenkins 

5. Prichard 

Time-1:33.5 

Mile Relay— 

1. M.M.I. 

2. Attucks 

3. Bardstown 

4. Fleming-Neon 

5. Bellevue 

Time-3:26.4 
Shot Pul^ 

1. Stuart-Metoalfe County 

2. Young-Georgetown 

3. Farmer-Fort Campbell 

4. Amet-Jenkins 

5. Logan-Beuxlstown 

IMstance-50' 6%" 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR AUGUST, 1966 



Page Thirteen 



Millersburg Military Inst. Track Team — K.H.S.A.A. Champion 1966 




(L^ft to Right) Front Raw: G. fiarofalo, B. Guise, J. Banks. M. Sellers, C. Davis, B. Rye, T. Anderson. Second Row: Coach 
R. Ghent. Col. Haynes, S .Dewey. B. Browning. D. Steele, R. Keiffer, K. Young. B. Cleveland, T. Cook, C. Ford, C. Bowen, 
M. Rentz, Coach Rees, Coach Dawson, C. Rockey. 



Pole Vault— 

1. Sprunger-Murray 

2. DesCombs-M.M.I. 

3. Broom-Fleming Neon 

4. Delaney-Bellevue 

5. Roots-Campbellsville 

Height-12' 6" 
High Jump — 

1. Burse-Attucks 



2. RotMuss-Bellevue 

3. Miller-Hancock County 

4. Harris-Madison 

5. Jones-Frankfort 

Height-6' 2" 
Long Jump — 

1. Winters-Bellevue 

2. Rogers-Bardstown 

3. McDaniels-Park City 



4. Ward-Providence 

5. Muse-Harlan 

Distance-21' 91/2" 
Discus — 

1. Spicer-Fleming Neon 

2. Vinson-Maysville 

3. Catlett-Attucks 

4. VanArsdale-Burgin 

5. Holbrook-Morgan County 

Distance-144' 10" 



TOTAL POINTS 

M.M.I. 38 

Attacks 37 

Bellevue 20 

Eminence 18 

Fleming Neon 16 

Bardstown 16 

Mnrray ^ 

Metcalfe County 8 

Jenkins 8 

Flat Gap 8 

Lynch 6 

Sayre 6 

Frankfort 5 

Maysville 4 



Providence 4 

Georgetown 4 

Hancock County 3 

Ballard Memorial 3 

Park City 3 

Fort Campbell 3 

Prichard 3 

Monticello 3 

Springfield 3 

Burgin 2 

Morgan County 2 

London 2 

Campbellsville 1 

Aquinas 1 

Harlan 1 

Hiseville 1 

Films 350.00 

Towel Service 100.00 

Miscellaneous Expenses — 

Tournament Mgr. 86.50 

Honorariums & Expenses^ 

Ass't. Tour Mgrs. 1.374.85 

Bad Checks 16.00 

State Sales Tax 4,945.89 

49,831.22 
Transfer of Funds — Amount Transferred to 

K.H.S.A.A. as Tournament Profit $127,289.05 



AUDIT . . . 

(Continued from Page Si-x) 

Officials* Fees and Expenses 1,787.64 . 

Scorers and Timers 600.00 

Shot Chart Keepers 

& Statisticians 300.00 

Ushers 2,600.00 

Ticket Sellers, Takers 

& Guards 3,838.13 

Public Address Announcers 250.00 

Telephone and Telegraph 38.67 



Page Fourteen 



THE KENTUCKY fflGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR AUGUST, 1966 



Officials' Ratings on 
Member Schools 



SCHOOL 

Adair County 

Adairville 

Ahrens 

Allen County 

Alvaton 

Anderson County 

Annville 

Aquinas 

Atherton 

Attucks 

Auburn 

Augusta 

Austin-Tracy 

Ballard Memorial 

Barbourville 

Bardstown 

Bath County 

Beech wood 

Belfry 

Bell County 

Bellevue 

Benton 

Berea 

Betsy Layne 

Bishop Brossart 

Bishop David 

Blaine 

Bloomfield 

Boone County 

Bourbon County 

Bowling Green 

Boyd County 

Boyle County 

Bracken County 

Breathitt County 

Breckinridge Co. 

Breckinridge Trng. _ 

Bremen 

Bristow 

Brodhead 

Bryan Station 

Buckhorn 

Burgin 

Burnside 

Bush 

Butler County 

Butler 

Caldwell County 

Calhoun 

Calloway County 

Campbell County 

Campbellsville 

Caneyville 

Carlisle County 

Carr Creek 

Carroll County 

Carter 

Casey County 

Catlettsburg 

Caverna 

Central 

Central City 

Chandler's Chapel _. 
Christian County __. 

Clarkson 

Clay County 

Clinton County 

College 

Corbin 

Cordia 

Covington Catholic . 

Crab Orchard 

Crittenden County _ 

Cuba 

Cub Run 

Cumberland 

Cumberland County 

Danville 

Daviess County 

Dawson Springs 

Dayton 

Deming 

DeSales 

Dilce Combs 

Dixie Heights 

Dorton 

Drakesboro 

duPont Manual 



Sportsmanship of K.H.S.A.A. 
in Basketball 1965-1966 











OTHER 


SCHOOL 1 


















COACH 




OFFICIALS 




CROWD 






TEAM 


E 


G 


F 


P 


E G 


F 


P 


E 


G 


F 


P 


E 


G 


F 


40 


12 1 


4 1 


6 1 


44 1 16 1 


1 


2 


38 


19 


2 


3 


39 


19 


2 


30 1 


5 1 


3 1 


2 1 


33 1 5 1 


2 1 





27 


10 


3 





26 


11 


3 


53 


8 








53 


7 








38 


21 


1 





32 


26 


3 


42 


8 


2 


4 


42 


11 





3 


37 


13 


2 


4 


38 


14 


2 


32 


8 


3 


1 


32 


11 





1 


32 


10 


1 


1 


32 


10 


2 


40 


14 


3 





46 


12 








40 


17 








43 


14 





39 


8 


5 





36 


10 


5 


1 


39 


10 


3 





37 


18 


2 


9 


1 


1 





10 











9 





1 





8 


2 





41 1 


17 


5 


3 


42 


20 


2 





36 


27 


3 





39 


24 


2 


33 


7 








35 


5 








27 


13 








30 


8 


2 


53 


6 








54 


5 








40 


17 


1 


1 


44 


13 


2 


51 


20 


3 


1 


51 


14 


1 


1 


35 


23 


8 


8 


40 


26 


5 


40 


8 


2 





44 


5 


1 





42 


7 


1 





41 


7 


2 


40 


8 


1 


6 


45 


9 


1 





39 


7 


4 


5 


38 


12 


4 


37 


5 








36 


6 








30 


8 


3 


1 


29 


9 


3 


26 


12 


4 


1 


30 


12 


1 





28 


11 


3 


1 


31 


10 


2 


40 


16 


2 





43 


13 


1 





39 


12 


7 





42 


9 


7 


39 


35 


4 


4 


56 


17 


2 


2 


40 


32 


5 


4 


37 


30 


6 


43 


8 





1 


44 


8 








42 


9 


1 





41 


10 


1 


48 


7 


3 1 


1 


54 


5 


1 





49 


5 


4 


2 


49 


9 


1 


58 


23 


2 


4 


54 


23 


2 





47 


33 


5 


2 


44 


38 


3 


31 


14 








34 


11 








27 


14 


2 


2 


33 


9 


2 


27 


9 


8 


5 


36 


8 


2 


3 


35 


8 


4 


2 


31 


7 


7 


33 


7 


4 


2 


38 


6 


1 


1 


33 


11 


2 





35 


7 


2 


41 


32 


2 


4 


47 


25 


1 





38 


33 


5 


1 


39 


29 


6 


49 


31 


3 


1 


59 


24 








37 


39 


5 


4 


40 


39 


2 


49 


10 


1 


3 


55 


9 








46 


14 


3 


1 


46 


10 


6 


41 


4 


2 





42 


4 








37 


9 


1 





41 


6 





B2 


20 


2 





69 


23 








43 


39 


1 





44 


35 


4 


42 


13 


2 





45 


10 


1 





42 


9 


4 


2 


45 


12 





63 


9 





3 


56 


6 





2 


50 


9 


2 


4 


54 


9 


1 


30 


6 


1 


4 


35 


5 








28 


8 


3 


1 


27 


9 


3 


40 


6 


1 





40 


6 


1 





38 


7 


2 





39 


8 





61 


8 








61 


7 








52 


17 








55 


12 


1 


39 


11 


3 


1 


39 


13 


2 





38 


16 


1 





39 


IS 


1 


46 


6 








46 


6 








29 


14 


6 


4 


41 


8 


2 


41 


11 


3 


6 


48 


10 


1 


1 


43 


15 


2 





47 


10 


3 


36 


14 


9 


9 


56 


11 


1 





37 


21 


3 


7 


42 


16 


5 


44 


8 


2 





45 


7 


2 





43 


8 


1 


2 


45 


8 


1 


41 


5 


2 


4 


42 


8 


1 


1 


30 


16 


5 


1 


35 


12 


4 


38 


10 


1 





39 


10 








36 


11 


2 





36 


11 


4 


17 


9 


5 


7 


29 


7 


2 





19 


8 


8 


3 


18 


11 


8 


23 


11 


9 


5 


38 


10 








23 


14 


9 





24 


13 


6 


37 


13 


5 


4 


43 


13 


1 


1 


27 


23 


2 


7 


26 


22 


7 


43 


6 


3 





48 


4 








38 


13 


1 





43 


7 


2 


4b 


17 


2 


1 


46 


17 


2 





41 


22 


1 


1 


42 


19 


4 


49 


16 


4 





53 


15 


1 





44 


19 


5 


1 


41 


20 


7 


51 


4 








46 


4 








49 


6 








51 


4 





51 


23 


7 


7 


69 


17 





3 


54 


27 


4 


3 


46 


33 


7 


21 


20 


1 


2 


28 


15 


1 





23 


15 


1 


5 


27 


16 





53 


33 


2 





65 


19 


2 





36 


42 


8 


1 


43 


39 


6 


41 


9 


3 


2 


47 


8 


1 





36 


15 


3 


3 


40 


11 


4 


39 


12 


2 


2 


49 


6 








47 


6 


2 





46 


7 


1 


40 


IS 


3 





4fi 


13 


1 





38 


16 


6 


1 


38 


19 


3 


42 


4 








41 


5 








40 


6 








41 


5 





39 


10 


4 


3 


44 


8 


4 





36 


14 


3 


3 


39 


13 


2 


29 


11 


3 


3 


38 


8 








30 


14 


1 


1 


31 


14 





36 


12 


1 


1 


40 


11 





1 


27 


18 


5 





32 


17 


2 


28 


9 





2 


33 


6 








28 


8 


3 





28 


10 


1 


44 


10 


1 





48 


4 








44 


8 


3 


1 


43 


8 


3 


31 


19 


5 





29 


22 





2 


21 


31 


3 





23 


28 


3 


55 


9 


3 


2 


60 


8 


fl 


1 


40 


22 


5 


2 


43 


13 


5 


32 


3 








32 


3 








30 


3 


2 





30 


5 





41 


5 


3 


3 


48 


4 








39 


11 


1 


1 


40 


9 


3 


28 


1 10 


7 


3 


35 


12 





1 


33 


11 


3 


1 


33 


12 


1 


75 


1 7 


4 


1 


79 


6 


1 


1 


77 


5 





6 


78 


7 


1 


34 


1 7 


6 


3 


43 


6 





1 


36 


9 


3 


2 


41 


9 





42 


5 


1 


3 


50 


1 








44 


4 


2 


1 


45 


5 


1 


46 


1 8 


2 





45 


11 








40 


12 


3 


1 


46 


7 


3 


33 


9 


2 


5 


36 


13 








33 


14 


2 





37 


10 


2 


41 


31 


5 


3 


51 


16 


3 


3 


43 


30 


4 


2 


49 


27 


4 


36 


6 


1 





35 


8 








27 


16 


1 





29 


14 





30 


9 


2 


2 


35 


8 








29 


12 


2 





28 


12 


2 


25 


12 


1 


n 


28 


9 


1 





21 


13 


4 





23 


15 





50 


6 








52 


t 4 








49 


4 


3 





61 


3 





41 


e 


1 





44 


4 








38 


8 


1 


1 


40 


8 





27 


8 





1 


28 


6 


1 


1 


26 


9 





1 


28 


7 





48 


4 


3 





48 


5 


1 





46 


7 


1 


1 


48 


5 


1 


70 


8 


2 


1 


71 


7 





1 


62 


13 


3 


2 


62 


14 


2 


41 


15 


3 


1 


51 


9 








44 


14 


2 





42 


15 


3 


63 


21 


7 





76 


18 


6 





59 


28 


4 





61 


27 


3 


54 


21 


1 


1 1 


57 


17 


2 





45 


29 


3 





41 


31 


4 


39 


21 


11 


10 


56 


21 


1 


3 


43 


26 


6 


6 


48 


27 


5 


34 


8 





1 


29 


12 








31 


10 


1 





27 


14 


1 


42 


28 


5 


1 


48 


22 


4 


1 


34 


37 


3 


2 


38 


34 


3 


48 


1 10 





2 


50 


8 








48 


11 


1 





43 


13 


2 


37 


15 


5 


5 


49 


12 





1 


29 


25 


4 


4 


31 


20 


6 


38 


10 


1 


1 


36 


11 


1 


1 


33 


16 


1 





30 


18 


2 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR AUGUST, 1966 



Page Fifteen 



Durrett 

Earlington 

Eastern 

East Hardin 

Edmonson County 

Elizabethtown 

Elizabethtown Catholic — 

Elkhorn City 

Eminence 

Estill County 

Eubank 

Evarts 

Ezel 

Fairdale 

Fairview 

Falmouth 

Fancy Farm 

Farmington 

Feds Creek 

Fergaison 

Fern Creek 

Flaget 

Flaherty 

Flat Gap 

Fleming County 

Fleming Neon 

Fords ville 

Fort Campbell 

Fort Knox 

Foundation 

Frankfort 

Franklin County 

Franklin-Simpson 

Frederick Fraize 

Fredericktown 

Fredonia 

Fulton 

Fulton County 

Gallatin County 

Gamaliel 

Garrard County 

Garrett 

George Rogers Clark 

Georgetown 

Glasgow 

Good Shepherd 

Graham 

Grant County 

Grayson County Catholic 

Greensburg 

Greenup 

Greenville 

Hall 

Hancock County 

Harlan 

Harrison County 

Harrodsburg 

Hazard 

Hazel Green 

Hazel Green Academey __ 

Heath 

Hellier 

Henderson 

Henderson County 

Henderson Settlement 

Henry Clay 

Henry County 

Hickman County 

Highlands 

Hindman 

Hiseville 

Hitchins 

Holmes 

Holy Cross 

Holy Family 

Holy Name 

Hopkinsville 

Hughes-Kirk 

Hustonville 

Inez 

Iroquois 

Irvine 

Jackson 

Jenkins 

Jessamine County 

Johns Creek 

Kingdom Come 

Knox Central 

Knott County 

Ky. School for the Deaf - 

Lafayette 

LaRue County 

Leatherwood 

Lebanon 

Lebanon Junction 

Lee County 

Leitehfield 



43 


29 


8 


4 


62 


20 





1 


53 


26 


4 


2 


49 


28 


5 


64 


8 


3 


1 


69 


6 


1 





51 


17 


6 


3 


66 


16 


2 


47 


12 


4 


2 


49 


13 





2 


44 


18 


2 


1 


46 


16 


2 


37 


17 


4 


2 


40 


16 


2 


2 


36 


20 


2 


2 


42 


16 


2 


49 


6 


3 


2 


60 


8 


1 


1 


43 


13 


3 


1 


45 


13 


2 


45 


8 


4 





49 


6 


1 


2 


43 


11 


3 





46 


11 


1 


63 


8 


2 





64 


8 


1 





41 


13 


3 


6 


47 


14 


2 


40 


7 








40 


7 








37 


9 


1 





38 


9 





32 


17 


3 





37 


12 


2 





37 


14 


1 


1 


37 


15 





61 


5 








59 


6 


1 





54 


10 


2 





58 


7 





27 


12 


4 


12 


36 


17 





2 


26 


19 


4 


7 


28 


22 


2 


45 


2 


1 


1 


45 


3 


1 





37 


7 


4 


1 


38 


10 


1 


51 


5 


1 


2 


54 


5 








49 


10 








51 


5 


2 


37 


14 


6 


2 


48 


9 


2 





35 


21 


3 





34 


22 


3 


32 


31 








42 


21 








33 


27 


3 





29 


32 


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26 


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21 


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31 


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26 


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31 


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23 


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22 


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45 


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32 


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42 


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41 


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25 


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30 


29 


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41 


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41 


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50 


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37 


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29 


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23 


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23 


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29 


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27 


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32 


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27 


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26 


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18 


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35 


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37 


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66 


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65 


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51 


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64 


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25 


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29 


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68 


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35 


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61 


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36 


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41 


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42 


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43 


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44 


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56 


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68 


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47 


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53 


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55 


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52 


7 








51 


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49 


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57 


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65 


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56 


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59 


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38 


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39 


8 








32 


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38 


8 





36 


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1 


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36 


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38 


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76 


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73 


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77 


12 


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25 


5 


2 


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28 


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23 


10 





1 


26 


7 





22 


11 


5 


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26 


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21 


12 


6 


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55 


12 


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59 


10 








60 


17 


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54 


11 


3 


53 


15 


1 


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64 


7 


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48 


23 








44 


27 





38 


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41 


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35 


12 








36 


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20 


6 








23 


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16 


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18 


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40 


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45 


12 





1 


32 


23 


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37 


18 


3 


42 


6 








42 


5 








39 


8 








41 


6 





32 


12 


2 


2 


39 


7 


1 


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26 


14 


5 


3 


34 


11 


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68 


36 


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59 


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56 


33 


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41 


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41 


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29 


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26 


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61 


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47 


9 








43 


10 


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45 


9 


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80 


16 


3 


1 


76 


14 


3 





67 


23 


7 


2 


71 


24 


4 


76 


12 


2 


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72 


11 


1 


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64 


26 


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2 


64 


25 


2 


41 


10 


1 


1 


46 


7 








36 


16 


1 





36 


15 


2 


47 


10 


2 


1 


62 


8 








46 


14 








46 


14 





29 


16 


6 


6 


43 


11 


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29 


21 


6 


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36 


16 


4 


54 


8 








52 


9 


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34 


28 


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33 


21 


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14 


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43 


12 








31 


21 


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16 


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42 


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46 


4 








44 


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37 


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13 


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15 


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9 


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2 








41 


6 








38 


6 


3 





43 


4 





44 


14 








45 


13 








40 


14 


4 





49 


9 





43 


4 





2 


40 


7 


2 





35 


10 


2 


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37 


9 


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62 


9 








65 


6 








49 


11 


1 





48 


11 


1 


44 


9 


2 


3 


46 


10 


1 


1 


38 


16 


2 


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37 


14 


5 


28 


5 


1 





27 


7 








24 


8 


2 





25 


7 


2 


45 


6 








46 


4 








44 


5 


1 





43 


6 


1 


39 


15 








36 


16 





1 


30 


23 








31 


20 


2_ 


28 


2 








27 


3 








26 


3 


1 





25 


4 





19 


10 


3 


6 


27 


6 


1 


3 


17 


12 


4 


6 


19 


9 


4 


18 


21 


9 


10 


32 


22 


1 


4 


25 


23 


5 


5 


24 


21 


7 


41 


6 





2 


41 


8 








36 


13 








37 


ID 


2 


23 


16 





2 


34 


7 








24 


15 


1 


1 


26 


14 





39 


16 


1 





43 


13 








31 


13 


9 


3 


36 


20 





47 


10 





1 


45 


13 








41 


15 


2 





44 


14 





56 


9 


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69 


8 








50 


11 


3 


3 


68 


7 


2 



(Continued in September Issue) 



Page Sixteen 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR AUGUST, 1966 



Does Your Present Student 
Policy Cover Your Athletes? 
We Can Solve Your Problem. 



^U^ /C4H^d04^ G04HpaH4f 



W. E. KINGSLEY 



121-123 LAFAYETTE AVENUE 
P. O. BOX 7100 



J. E. McCREARY, Mgr. 
Life Department 

LEXINGTON, KY. 



GENERAL AGENT 
CHARLES C. PRICE 

PHONE 255-0837 



THE FLYING DUTCHMAN 

(Continued from Page Four) 

sible to keep right on playing, which is an 
excellent way to enjoy the golden age. 

Oakley Brown, who coached for eigh- 
teen years in Hopkinsville and who was 
assistant to the Dutchman for twenty years, 
has retired from his recreation post with 
the Jefferson County Playground and Recre- 
ation Board, at the age of 65. You can find 
Oakley on his farm at Yosemite, fishing on 
the lake nearby or shooting in the low 
eighties on the golf course. Drop Oakley a 
line. He'll be glad to hear from you. 

The Dutchman signs off this column 
with a motto he got from the sports-loving 
John Trapp years ago — "Take a lesson from 
the turtle. He sticks his neck out if he 
wants to get somewhere." 



For Quality 

Athletic and Physical 
Education Equipment 



TRADE WITH 



the Midland Trail Sport Shop 

13 SOUTH BANK STREET 
MT. STERLING, KENTUCKY 



GIRLS GOLF 

(Continued from Page Nine) 
191 — Baute (Lebanon) 

193 — Lewis (Atherton) 

194 — Essig (Westport), Ford (Owensboro), 
(Lafayette) 

195 — Pitchford (Scottsville) 

196 — Tackett (Frankfort) 



Bird 



NEW PUBLICATION 

A GUIDE FOR COACHING 8-MAN FOOTBALL, 
by Dave Thayer 

The only complete, comprehensive, illustrated, 8- 
Man football booklet in the U. S. today. Ideal for 
coaches, physical education instructors, intramural 
directors, recreation directors, or players. In this 
booklet the author describes and illustrates his 8-Man 
Multiple Offense including: play-call system, blocking 
rules, types of blocks, offensive drills, and plays. The 
chapter on 8-Man Defense includes formations, stunts, 
fundamentals and drills. In addition the booklet covers 
the complete kicking game as weU as administration, 
scouting, transportation, utilization of coaching person- 
nel, and practise sessions for 8-Man Football. 

Price: $2.00. Send to: (Dapt. Dave Thayer, Head 
Football Ctoach, Western Military Academy, Alton, 
Illinois. 



SUTCUffE'S IS READY 

with complete football, basketball 
and athletic eauipment for the fall season 



No delay — no waiting — immediate delivery! Stock merchandise is 
shipped on the very day an order is received. 

We maintain and operate our own sewing, engraving, and service depart- 
ments, which enables us to render faster service. 




Attention: All Coaches 

Be on the lookout for oui- "SPECIALS" We 
are offering you regularly. These are all "in 
stock" special merchandise for immediate 
shipment, and are unusual values. 



QUALITY BRANDS 

Our stocks this year are the same top 
quality for which Sutcliffe is now well 
known — nationally-distributed, nationally- 
advertised preferred quality brands. 



_ SUTCLIFFE'S SERVICE 

^^TK* \ IA\ For on-the-spot service, the Sutcliffe School repre 
sentative will contact you, as usual, during the year, 



Write us about your needs. Remember we give one 
day service. 





thedUTCLIFFEco, 

INCORPORATED 

115 SOUTH 7th STREET., LOUISVILLE, KY. 



FAIR - PLAY 
OUT IN FRONT FOR OVER 25 YEARS 

FAIR - PLAY 
FF-IS FISURGRAM BOARD 

Here's the world's most popular basketball scoreboard — the 
FF-IS — with famous TICK-AWAY flashing numeral clock orig- 
inated by Fair-Play. Shows exact number of minutes and sec- 
onds remaining: in same. Accurate, dependable, and easily 
serviced. 

Sturdy, all-aluminum alloy cabinet, fully enclosed with no 
exposed wiring. Non-grlare. baked enamel finish. Choice of 
colors: gray, red, green, blue and black with white lettering. 

IN STOCK 

We carry the Figurgram basketball boards in stock for immed- 
iate delivery. Boards for other sports also available. Any board 
can be made special to order. 

Model Description Lbs. 

FF-IS — Single Face Tickaway with 9 inch numerals . 125 

FF 1S-12 — Single Face Tickaway with 12 inch numerals 150 

FF.1S-PF— Deluxe Tickaway with Player Name and Foul Panels — 500 

(Add $72.00 if FF-IS is to have 12 inch numerals.) 

FF-2S — Double Face Tickaway with 9 inch numerals 250 

FF-2S-12 — Double Face Tickaway with 12 inch numerals 300 

MULTIPLE INSTALLATIONS: When 2 or more boards are installed 
to be operated together, the price is the same as 2 or more single 
boards, less $30.00 if scoreboards are bought at the same time. 

No. 12PRL LINEUP PANELS lowerable and reversible with player names 
and numbers for 4 teams and next game panel. Numbers, letters, 
lowering system furnished .. 

No. 12PF PLAYER FOUL PANELS— Shows 5 fouls for 12 players 

each team, per pair 

EPW FOUL INDICATOR or MATCH SCORE WRESTLING 

ATTACHMENT wilh control panel 

FB-50-A2 FOOTBALL SCOREBOARD 

This is THE scoreboard for high school or college football — 
the most popular football scoreboard made and the standard 
for fields and stadiums from Maine to California. 
This big FB-50-A2 is 18 feet long, 8 feet high, weight 750 
pounds. It's durable, too; an all-aluminum cabinet, fully en- 
closed for protection against weather, dust vandalism. Beauti- 
fully finished in white, forest green or signal black (special 
colors on request at extra cost). 

Big 24-inch flashing numerals show TIME. SCORE, PERIOD, 
DOWN and YARDS TO GO. Tickaway Clock shows the exact 
number of minutes and seconds left to play. 



I 



Price 
$ 525.00 
. 570.00 
. 1,305.00 

. 945.00 
. 1,045.00 



.$185.00 
$595.00 
$195.00 



Model 

FB-50-A2— 18'x8' with 24" 
FB-33-C— 18'x7'2" with 24" 
FB-50-S— 24'x8'6" with 30' 



Description Lbs. Night Only 

Day Only 

numbers 750 .... $1615.00 

numbers 675 1535.00 

CLOCK numbers , 1250 2195.00 



Both Day 

& Night 

$1695.00 

1615.00 

2275.00 



INSTALLATION EQUIPMENT 

CONTROL CABLE: From board to sideline and/or press box, 

19 conductor (for either underground or overhead installation) per foot. 55 

Sideline DOWN & YARDS TO GO portable cable, per foot 20 

Sideline TIMERS portable cable, includes hand switch, oer foot. 20 

CONTROL RECEPTACLES AND BOX: (Minimum of one required} 

1. Press Box Type $20.00 

2. Sideline type (raintight with hasp) $25.00 

A special panel for Coca-Cola, Pepsi-Cola, Dr. Pepper, Ford, Chevrolet, Oldsmobile or any special desigm 

can be duplicated at an extra cost to fit on the bottom of either type board. 

All Fair Play boards carry a one-year guarantee. We have all necessary repair parts in stock and 

also maintain an experienced service man. 

Take advantage of the present day prices and place your order now for at once or future delivery. 

All prices subject to change without notice. 

HUNT'S ATHLETIC GOODS CO. 



CHapel 7-194! 



(Incorporated) 



MAYFIELD, KENTUCKY 




HiqhSchoofAfhIete 

K.H.S.A.A. SCHOOL FOR FOOTBALL OFFICIALS 




Above are ares representatives who attended the School for Football Officials, held in 
Lexington on August 5-6. They are: (Left to Right) Front Row— Joe Treas, Fulton; Ray 
Canady, Barbourville; George Mercker, Louisville; Bill Mayhew, Elizabethtown; Bill Moi^ 
dica, Ashland; Gordon Reed, Fort Thomas. Second Row — Clyde Parsley, Providence; E. B. 
May, Jr., Prestonsburg; Robert Fallon, Hazard; Vic Brizendlne, Louisville; School Director 
Edgar McNabb, South Fort Mitchell; Bernard Johnson, Lexington; Paul Walker, Glasgow. 



Official Organ of tlie 

KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION 

SEPTEMBER, 1966 



Football Districts and Regions 

The football districts and regions for 
1966, are as follows: 

Class AAA 
REGION I 

Atheiton. Bishoii David, Central, DeSales, duPont Manual, 
FJaget, Iroquois, Male, Shawnee, St. Xavier, Trinity 

REGION II 

District 1 — 

Butler, Fairdale. Pleasure Ridge Park, Southern, Valley, 
Western 
District 2 — 

Durrett, Eastern, Fern Creek, Seneca, Thomas Jefferson, 
Waggener, Westport 

Class AA 
REGION I 

District 1— 

Bowling Green, Caldwell County, Christian County, Frank- 
lin-Simpson, Hopkinsville. Madisonville, Mayfield, Paducah 
District 2 — 

Butler County, Henderson, Henderson County, Ohio County, 
Owensboro, Owensboro Catholic. Union County 

REGION II 

District 1 — 

Elizabethtown, Breckinridge County, Fort Knox, Franklin 
County. Henry County, Kentucky Military Institute, LaRue 
County, Meade County, North Hardin, Oldham County, St. 
Joseph. Shelby County 
District 2 — 

Bourbon County, Bryan Station, Clark County, Danville, 
Dunbar (Lexington), Harrison County, Henry Clay, Jessamine 
County, Lafayette. Madison. Madison Central, Shelbyville. 
Somerset, Tates Creek, Woodford County 

REGION III 

District 1 — 

Boone County. Campbell County, Dixie Heights, Highlands, 
Holmes, Newport. Newport Catholic, Simon Kenton 
District 2 — 

Boyd County, Fleming County, Louisa, McKell, Paul G. 
Blazer. Raceland, Rowan County, Russell 

REGION IV 

District 1— 

Bel] County, Gorbin, Cumberland, Evarts, James A. Ca- 
wood, Knox Central, Middlesboro, Whitley County 
District 2— 

Belfry, Hazard. Jenkins, Leslie Count.v, M. C. Napier, 
Prestonsburg. Whitesburg 

Class A 
REGION I 

District 1 — 

Crittenden County, Fort Campbell, Fulton, Fulton County, 
Murray, North Marshall, Russellville, Trigg County, Warren 
County 
District 2 — 

Campbellsville, Cumberland County, Glasgow, Greensburg, 
Metcalfe County, Tompkinsville 

REGION II 
District 1— 

Bardstown, Eminence. Lebanon, Louisville Country Day, 
Old Kentucky Home, Shepherdsville, Springfield 
District 2— 

Anderson, Berea, Boyle County. Burgin, Frankfort, Gar- 
rard County, Georgetown, Harrodsburg, Ky. School for the 
Deaf, Mercer County, Sayre, Scott Couty, Stanford 

REGION III 

District 1 — 

Beechwood, Bellevue, Carroll County. Dayton. Lloyd 
Memorial. Ludlow, Owen County 
District 2— 

Bath County, Falmouth. Ii-vine, Millersburg Military In- 
stitute. Montgomery County. Mt. Sterling, Nicholas County, 
Paris 

REGION IV 

District 1— 

Harlan. Hazel Green, Lily, London, Lynch, Lynn Camp, 
Mt. Vernon. Pineville. Williamsburg 
District 2— 

Catlettsburg. Elkhorn City. Fleming-Neon. Johns Creek. 
Morgan County. Paintsville, Pikeville. Wheelwright, Wurtland 

1966 FOOTBALL PUBLICATIONS CORRECTIONS 

Page 33: 7-1-3— Reference (as in 2-27) 

Page 48: 10-3-3— Reference (See Rule 2-28-6 . . .1 
Case Book 

Page 9, Play 17: Ruling for part (b) should state 
"in (b), the covering official will stop the clock . . ." 
It may or may not be the referee. 

Page 10, Play 19: A football rules committee in- 
terpretation is the basis far the ruling. 

Page 20, Play 103J: The third sentence of the rul- 
ing in its entirety should correctly read as follows: 



"Bl is not eligible to continue to participate until the 
equipment has been sanctioned, or if illegal, is re- 
moved." 

Page 28, Play 122B: Delete the entire piay. 

Page 32, Play 131: The third line from the bottom 
of the page is misplaced. It should follow the last 
line on the page. In this order, it will read corrrectly. 

Page 49, Play 222B: Delete from the second line 
in the ruling the word "not". 

Page 82, Play 268A: Revised ruling should prop- 
erly read "illegal or unsportsmanlike coaching from 
the sidelines," 

Page 82, Play 268C: Questions have been raised 
concerning the ruling for this situation. It is, how- 
ever correct. 
Football Rules — Simplified and Illustrated 

Page 76, 2nd play: Revised ruling: "After sig- 
nalling offsetting penalties, B's ball, 1st and 10 at 
spot of foul by B2." 

FILMS 

The films listed below are in the Film Library 
of the University of Kentucky College of Education. 
The Code letters "e,],s,c,a," refer to elementary, junior 
high, senior high, college and adult audiences who 
may enjoy the particular film listed. The rental prices 
shown do not apply to schools which use one of the 
special subscription service plans, offered by the 
Bureau of Audio-Visual Material. 

Football 
BALL HANDLING IN FOOTBALL, j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $1.50. 

Fundamentals of ball handling are stressed; stance, 
grip, "feel" of the ball, finger-tip control adjustment 
before throwing or kicking, receiving passes from cen- 
ter or from a back, catching passes and punts, ways 
of carrying ball, and changing from one hand to 
another. Game shots are presented, using slow motion 
and stop action techniques, and superimposed anima- 
tion to illustrate principles. 
BLOCKING IN FOOTBALL, j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $1.50. 

Fundamentals of good blocking are taught in this 
film; position, speed, drive, follow-through, timing, 
and body control. Describes shoulder and body blocks, 
demonstrating several varieties of these. Importance 
of good physical condition, practice, and experience 
are emphasized. Special photography used to illustrate 
different points. 
OFFICIAL FOOTBALL j-s-c-a, 3 reels, color, $1.00. 

This film portrays the play situations covering the 
basic rules of football as played under the National 
Alliance Code. The theme is centered around the offi- 
cial interpretations of the rules as they apply to the 
three teams always present on the field, the home 
team, the visiting team and that all important third 
team, the officials. 
TACKLING IN FOOTBALL, j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $1.50. 

Tackling properly is shown as the result of appli- 
cation of certain fundamentals: good physical condi- 
tion, speed, body placement, drive, sure grip, timing, 
and body control. Shoulder and cross body tackles are 
demonstrated in various ways, with special instruc- 
tions for safety and means of a reducing shock. 
THIS IS FOOTBALL, e-j-s-c-a, 4 reels, color, $1.00. 

Centered around the four S's — Science, speed, 
skill and safety. Demonstrations cover basic rules 
that will aid the official, coach, players, and fan. 
Play situations are used to establish standards. 
KNOW YOUR FOOTBALL, e-j-s-c-a, 3 reels, color, 
$1,00. 

This film gives a visual approach to the written 
rules. Play situation chosen wlil chaUengee the view- 
rules. Play situation chosen will challenge the view- 
er's knowledge and clarify many rules interpreia- 
pass interference and a multitude of o+her difficult 
decisions. It is recommended for fans as well as of- 
ficials, coaches and players. 



The Kentucky High School Athlete 

Official Organ of the 
Kentucky High School Athletic Association 



VOL. XXIX— NO. 2 



SEPTEMBER, 1966 



$1.00 Per Year 




Sherman Gish 
President 



Don Davis 
Vice-President 



Superintendent Sherman Gish of the Muhlenberg 
County Schools was elected President of the K.H.S.A.A. 
Board of Control at the summer meeting of the di- 
rectors held on July 30, 1966. Assistant Superintendent 
Don Davis of the Kenton County Schools was elected 
Board Vice-President. The two men represent res- 
pectively Sections 2 and 5. 

Mr. Gish, a graduate of Bremen High School, 
holds A.B. and M.A. degrees from Western Kentucky 
University. He is married to the former Ruby Mae 
Miller. They have one son. Raymon "Rip" Gish, a 
former basketball star at Western Kentucky, who is 
now with the Phillips Petroleum Company after play- 
ing for the Marines two years. 

Sherman Gish has been in the Muhlenberg County 
school system for the past thirty-nine years in various 
positions, teacher, coach, principal and superinten- 
dent. He is a member of the Bethlehem Baptist 
Church, the Third District Kentucky Educational As- 
sociation, the National Educational Association, and the 
state and national associations of school admin- 
istrators. 

Mr. Davis, a graduate of the Dayton High School, 
holds degrees from Cincinnati and St. Xavier Uni- 
versities. A college letterman in football, basketball, 
and baseball, he has coached these sports in high 
school as well as track and swimming. 

Mr. Davis is affiUated with numerous professional 
educational organizations. He is a Past President of 
the Bellevue Rotary Club, a charter member of the 
Campbell County Youth Advisory Committee, and a 
Past Chairman of the Bellevue Youth Advisory Com- 
mittee. He was in the service during the 1941-46 period, 
being discharged with the rank of 1st Lieutenant in 
the Coast Artillery Anti-Aircraft. Since that time 
teaching and coaching assignments have been at WeUs- 
ton (Ohio) High School, Dayton High School, and 
Hobnes High School. From 1957 to 1962 Mr. Davis was 
Principal of the Bellevue High School, and he was 
named Assistant Superintendent of Kenton County 
Schools in 1962. He is married to the former Mary 
Louise Byland. They have four children, one boy and 
three girls. 



Attention, Principals! 

K.H.S.A.A. By-Law 23 provides that officials for 
any contest shall be agreed upon at least ten days be- 
fore the contest. Many administrators and coaches are 
not complying with the provisions of this rule. Visiting 
coaches arrive at the game site with no agreement on 
officials having been made, the theory being "You 
name the officials when we play on your floor lor 
field), and I'll name the officials when youi' team 
conies our way." Through the years much trouble 
has developed when this plan has been followed. 

The rule mentioned states that it is the responsi- 
bility of the home school principal to instigate pro- 
ceedings leading to the agreement on officials. If the 
home school principal fails in this duty, the admini- 
strator or coach of the visiting school is not relieved 
completely of his responsibility to see to it that the 
officials are agreed upon. 

A list of registered football officials appears in 
this issue of the ATHLETE. Principals and coaches 
should study the current list to determine whether or 
not all officials with whom contracts have been signed 
have registered this fall. Supplementary list of officials 
will appear in subsequent issues of the magazine. By- 
Law 22 provides that member schools shall use regi- 
stered officials in all football and basketball games, 
and that failure to comply with this regulation makes 
the home school liable for suspension. If there is any 
question about registration, the official should be 
asked to present his card. 



Attention, Officials! 

The attention of all registered K.H.S.A.A. football, 
basketball and baseball officials is called to By-Law 
29, Section 9, which provides that the official shall 
be supplied with an emblem which he shall wear on 
his shirt or sweater. This rule will be enforced strictly 
in 1966-67 as it has been in recent years. The emblem 
is to be worn on the left shoulder shirt sleeve approxi- 
mately one and one-half inches below the shoulder 
seam. The Approved or Certified bar should be worn 
below the emblem. Failure to wear the emblem will 
make an official liable for suspension from the Offi- 
cials' Division of the Association. 

Recommended uniforms are as follows: 

Football — black and white striped shirt (long or 
short sleeves), black baseball cap with white piping, 
white knee pants, black belt, black stockings, black 
shoes and laces; 

Basketball — black and white striped shirt (short 
sleeves, long sleeves by special permission), black 
trousers, black belt, black shoes and laces; 

Baseball — navy blue or black trousers, black 
athletic leather shoes (not football shoes), navy blue 
coat or jacket, navy blue shirt if working coatless, 
white shirt if wearing coat or jacket, white shirt on 
bases if all base umpires are dressed the same, um- 
pire's navy cap (no player caps), indicator and mask 
of choice, inner protector or inflated protector (in- 
flated type if official desires to purchase), black belt, 
black shoe laces, black tie with white shirt. 



Page Twr THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR SEPTEMBER, 1966 

SEPTEMBER, 196B VOL. XXIX— No. 2 ol 80 in order to maintain this rating from year to year. 

■ — ■ ~ After an official has received the Certified rating, he 

Published monthly, except June and July, by the Kentucky continues to receive this rating each year provided that 

Offic"o"f%ub'irc"a'tioTLexin^lon!"K""4050i he abends the clinic for that year and has worked in 

Second class postage paid at Lexington, Kentucky. at least six first team high SChool football games 

Editor THEO. A. SANFORD during the previous year. Eligible officials who wish 

Assistant Editor „___^____-„^.... J. B. MANSFIELD j^ j^j^^ ^^^ j^^j should write to the State Office. 

BOARD OF CONTROL Attention, Football Coaches! 

President Sherman Gish (1963-67). Greenville During the SchOOl for FODtball Officials, which Was 

Vice-President Don Davis (1963-67), Independence held in Lexington OH August 5-6, Several Suggestions 

Directors — Morton Combs (1964-68), Carr Creek: Ralph C. were made which if thpv nrp fnllnwpri will imnrnvp 

Dorsey (1966-70). Horse Cave; Preston Holland (1965-69). Were maae VVtliCn, II Mey are lOllOWeO, WUi improve 

Murray; Don R. Rawiings (196.5-69), Danville; Foster J. the administration of the game. The Commissioner as 

Sanders (1966-70), Louisville; Oran C. Teater (1964-68), asking eaCh head foolball COach tO do the foUowing 

Paintsviile. when his team plays at home: 

Subscription Rate $1.00 Per Year ^ g^^ ^^ j^ ^^^^ ^jj ^^ ^^^ playing field IS marked 

^-^» I r-i f /D\Pi> ^^'''-h ^'"^^ 5 yards apart; 

if%Om the Commissionel S Office 2. Assign members of the chain crew for the sea- 

-'■' son, ij this IS possible; 

~ , , ,, „.. : 3. Have all team boxes marked clearly; 

hJaskelDall Clinics 4 Explain in detail to the clock operator the pro- 

The 1966-57 rules meetings for registered basket- visions of Football Rules 3-5-2 and 3-5-3. 

ball officials and coaches will be conducted by veteran Attention, Basketball Coaches! 

cilinic director Charlie Vettiner. The dates and sites The dates and sites of the 1966-67 basketball clinics 

of the meetings are as follows: are given elsewhere in this issue of the ATHLETE. 
September 25, Phoenix Hotel, Lexing::on, 1:30 P.M. clinic attendance bv head basketball coaches is re- 
September 25, Newport High School, 7:00 P.IVI. quired under the provisions of K.H.S.A.A. By-Law 29-3. 
September 26, Moreliead State University. 1:30 P.IVI. Players and other members of the school's coaching 
September 26, Paul G. Blazer High School, Ash- staff are invited to attend the clinic. Basketball coaches 

land, 7:00 P.M. are urged to bring their scorers and timers to the 

September 27, Pikeville H:gh School, 1:30 P.M. meetings. 

tieptember 27, Hazard High School, 7:00 P.M. New FootbaU Film 

September 28 B^ll High School Pineville 1.30 P.M ^^^ ^^^^, f^^^^^u ^.^ ^^^^ YOUR FOOTBALL, 

September 28 Somerset High School 7:00 P.M ^^^, released for distribution on July 1, 1966. The film 

1 on p m""" ' "^^ ^^ ' ^^'■"°'''^- was produced under the sanction and supervision of 

r^ ; u' o T^ • ^ t tr- u c u 1 r^ the National Federation of State High School Athletic 

, °Tn^f ^2 °^^'^^s C°""*y "'-'' S'^^^°^' °'^^"^- Associations and allied groups. This film is the twenty- 

Doro .IJU t'.m xr- u c I 1 T, J . 1 or. f'f'h in the series of official rules films and the tenth 

October 3, Tilghman High School, Paducah, 1:30 football film 

■ ^ , n ^u • t- ^ i TT- 1 c u 1 TT Wheaties Sports Federation and Wilson Sporting 

,. 0.'f°ber 3, Christian County High School, Hop ^^^^^ ^^ ^^^ ^^^.^ ^^^^.^^ ^^ co-sponsors of the 

Kinsville ^00 F.lVi. -, on DT\/r ^J'™ ^3 they have for all previous films. 

Ocober4 Reservoir HiU, Bowling Green, 1.30 P.M ^he scenes for KNOW YOUR FOOTBALL were 

Oc ober 4, Elizabethtown High SchcDol, 7:00 P.M. fji,^^^ ^„ ^^^ Glendale High School football field, 

October 5, Kentucl<y Hotel, Louisville, 7:00 P.M. Qlendale, Arizona. The host state association was the 

School for Basketball Officials Arizona Interscholastic Association, Inc. Playing per- 

The Eighteenth Annual School of Mechanics foi sonnel were chosen from the Glendale High School. 

Basketball Officials was held at the Phoenix Hotel, Members of the National Federation of State High 

Lexington, on August 7-8, 1966. Basketball Chnic Di School Athletic Associations and allied .groups served 

rector Charlie Vettiner directed the school. as members of the Technical Staff, and thereby assure 

The services of the area representatives who at- the authenticity of the rules for the situations filmed, 

tended the school wl:l be available to Association mem Outstanding officials were chosen from Colorado, Illi- 

ber schools throughout (he basketball season. The men nois. Nevada and Utah to appear in the film, 

will conduct additional clinics for officials, coaches KNOW YOUR FOOTBALL gives a visual approach 

and players; and will assist beginning officials in regi to the written rules as they apply to the game of 

stration. football. Play situations chosen for the film cover re- 

K.H.S.A.A, area representatives who attended the quests from officials and coaches who not only wanted 

school were: Jeriy Kmmel, Beechmont; Bob Goui. to know the rules but to have guide-lines that would 

Bowling Green; Roy Winchester, Bethlehem; Bob Fos help them understand those difficult judgment decisions, 

ter. Science Hill; Charlie Ii-win, Hopkins\'ille; Howard KNOW YOUR FOOTBALL is recommended for fans 

Gardner, Elizabethtown; Rex Alexandei, Murray: as well as officials, coaches and players. 

Claude Ricketts, Louisville; Hubert Louden. Louisville; Two prints of the film have been secured by the 

Billy Wise, Lexington; Kenneth Loudj-, Slemp; Wall Kentuckj- High School Athletic Association, and have 

Green, Middlesboro; Jack Wise. Georgetown; E. B. been placed on loan with the Bureau of School Service, 

May, Jr., Prestonsburg; Ern'e Chattin, Ashland: Bol College of Education, University of Kentuckj". 

Miller, Fort Thomas; Roy Settle, Ovvensboro. ■ — 

Football Examination Minutes of Board Meeting 

Part II of the National Federation Football Exami- The Board of Control of the Kentucky High School 

nation for officials will be given in Kentucfo' on Mon- Aliiletic Association met at Kenlake Hotel, Kentuckv 

l?'.f w "/^", ^^- ^"^ "".''■-''I ''■';° ^^ ^"""l i-'-^g'stered Lake State Park, on Saturday morning, July 30, 1966. 

for at least one j'ear prior to the current season is _, ,. „ , , , ..%,.,, 

eligible to take the examination and work for a higher ^"^ meeting was caUed to order by retiring President 

rating. Officials who hold the Approved rating in foot- Foster J. Sanders at 9:30, with Board members 

ball aiT required to make a minimum percentage grade (Continued on Page Six^ 



THE KENTUCKY fflGH SCHOOL ATHLETTE FOR SEPTEMBER. 1966 



Page Three 



Officials' Ratings on Sportsmanship of K.H.S.A.A. 
Member Schools in Basketball 1965-1966 



SCHOOL 

Leslie County 

Letcher 

LevFis County 

Lewisburg 

Lexington Catholic 

Liberty 

Lily - 

Lincoln Institute 

Livermore 

Livingston 

Livingston Central 

Lloyd 

London 

Lone Jack 

Lone Oak 

Louisa 

Louisville Country Day — 

Louisville Male 

Lowes 

Loyall 

Ludlow 

Lynch 

Lynn Camp 

Lyon County 

McCreary County 

McDowell 

McKee 

McKell 

McKinney 

Mackville 

Madison 

Madison Central 

Madisonville 

Martin 

Mason County 

Mayfield 

Maysville 

Maytown 

M. C. Napier 

Meade County 

Meade Memorial 

Memorial (Hardyville) 

Memorial (Waynesburg) . 

Menifee County 

Mercer County 

Metcalfe County 

Middlesboro 

Millersburg Military Inst. 

Model 

Montgomery County 

Monticello 

Morgan County 

Mt. Sterling 

Mt. Vernon 

Mt. Washington 

Muhlenberg Central 

Mullins 

Munfordville 

Murray 

Murray College 

Nancy 

Newport 

Newport Catholic 

Nicholas County 

North Hardin 

North Marshall 

North Warren 

Ohio County 

Oil Springs 

Old Kentucky Home 

Oldham County 

Olive Hill 

Olmstead 

Oneida 

Owen County 

Owensboro 

Owensboro Catholic 

Owsley County 

Paducah Tilghman 

Paintsville 

Paris 

Park City 

Paul G. Blazer 

Pendleton 

Phelps 

Pikeville 





(Continued from August ATHLETE) 






















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Page Four 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR SEPTEMBER, 1966 



Pine Knot 

Pine Mountain 

Pineville 

P. L. Dunbar 

Pleasure Ridge Park 

Powell County 

Prestonsburg 

Prichard 

Providence 

Pulaski County 

Raceland 

Red Bird 

Reidland 

Richardsville 

Riverside Christian 

River\'iew 

Rosenwald 

Rowan County 

Russell 

Russell County 

Russellville 

Sacramento 

St. Agatha 

St. Aloysius 

St. Augustine 

St. Catherine 

St. Charles 

St. Francis 

St. Heni-y 

St. Joseph 

St. Mary (Paducah) __. 
St. Mary's (Whitesville) 

St. Patrick 

St. Thomas 

St. Vincent 

St. Xavier , 

Salyersville 

Sandy Hook 

Say re 

Scott County 

Scottsville 

Sedalia 

Seneca 

Shawnee 

Shelby County 

ShelbyviUe 

Shepherdsville 

Shopville 

Silver Grove 

Simon Kenton 

Somerset 

South Hopkins 

South Marshall 

South Portsmouth 

Southern 

Springfield 

Stanford 

Symsonia 

Tates Creek 

Taylor County 

Taylorsville 

Temple Hill 

Thomas Jefferson 

Todd County 

ToUesboro 

Tompkinsville 

Trigg County 

Trimble County 

Trinity 

Tyner 

Union County 

Valley 

Van Lear 

Virgie 

Waggener 

Wallins 

Walton- Verona 

Warfield 

Warren County 

Wayland 

Wayne County 

Webster County 

Western (Shively) 

Western (Sinai) 

West Hardin 

West Hopkins 

Westport 

Wheelwright 

Whitesburg 

Whitley County 

Williamsburg 

Williamstown 

Willisburg 

Wingo 

Wolfe County 

Woodword County 

Wurtlana 



63 


6 1 


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1 2 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR SEPTEMBER, 1936 



Page Five 



The Flying Dutchman 




Virginia sent its distinguished assistant commis- 
sioner, Earl Gillespie, to the K.H.S.A.A. Schools of 
Mechanics for fjotball and basketball officials and 
Earl was immediately a favorite in both schools. Edgar 
McNabb did his usual fine job with the football of- 
ficiaLs. The Dutchman hobbled on a couple of rulings 
and Kentucky's assistant commissioner, Joe Billy 
Mansfield, served him a generous helping of crow 
while the students enjayed chicken which is much 
tastier. 

Bob Gour, Bowling Green; Hubert Louden, Pros- 
pect; Billy Wise, Lexington; and Ken Loudy, of Slemp 
were freshmen representatives of their areas. Bob 
Gour is the lad who got the Officials Association or- 
ganized in Warren County last year; Billy Wise is 
either the older or younger brother of Jack — we never 
could find out; Ken Lcudy is one of the busiest offi- 
cials in the mountainous fourteenth region; while Hu- 
bert Louden is one of Louisville's crack traffic officers 
who bosses the 4lh and Walnut Street area. Hubert 
issues jay-walking citations by day and technical rep- 
rimands by night. 

Bob Gour emphasized the importance of at least 
one officials association in each area of Ketucky. The 
formation of these associations which meet weekly or 
semi-monthly, is one of our prime aims this year. They 
offer opportunities for individual improvement and 
good fellowship. As you get together to form your 
association, bear in mind that unselfish cooperation 
with fellow officials, coaches and school principals 
will return the greatest dividends for the sport and 
you. 

Prestonsburg's E. B. May, Jr., proudly announced 
the opening of a modern public park in his mountain 
city. Oran Teater already has one in Paintsville, a 
little higher up the mauntain, so it appears that parks 
are becoming a trademark of progress in eastern 
Kentucky. Anytime a park is dedicated in the moun- 
tains you'll hear a cheer come out of Hazard from 
Mayor Willie D^wahare. Willie believes in park de- 
velopment like he believes in Christmas dinner. 

The 1966-1967 basketball clinics get underway on 
Sunday afternoon, September 25th. at tlie Phoenix 
Hotel in Lexington. Back in 1S41, Barbourville's Bu- 
ford Clark waa the chnic director for the K.H.S.A.A. 
but when Buford became indignant with Adolph (Hitler 
not Rupp) and went to Canada to join the Canadian 
Air Force, Commissioner Sanford sent the Dutchman 
out on his first clinic tour. So it is that this is the 
twenty-fifth consecutive year and about 50,000 miles 
of driving for your Dutch interpreter. Incidentally, 
Buford fixed Adolph good. 

Claude Ricketts predicts that more than 300 will 
attend the Louisville clinic; Stanley Arnzen is short- 
ing for 500 at Newport; and Ernie Chattin says that 
officials from Ohio, West "Virginia, as well as Ken- 




Hubert Louden 

tucky, will jam the meeting room in Paul Blazer High 
School in Ashland. Hope Bobby Laughlin and Ellis 
Johnson show up. They are the life of any clinic. 

Cliff Harper, of Alabama has made one of the 
truly great contributions to the standardization and 
improvement of basketball ofticiating through his 
booklet of play illustrations. Last year the Dutchman 
had only one to show at the clinics but this year 
anybody with six bits may buy a copy. The K.H.S.A.A. 
has purchased a sunoly from the National Federation 
and they are available to everybody this year. 

The first nomination for the Game Guy of 1967 has 
come from Leo Tierney who pra-ses David Ruzanka 
for his achievements in football, baseball, basketball 
and soccer in spite of s birth deformity of hi^ right 
arm, wrist and hand. Leo is high on this kid with 
the heart of a lion who is also an honor student. Send 
vour nomination for the Game Guy Award to the 
Dutchman, Box 36 Jetfersontown. 

From Cha'-lie R-^pd com'^;s n recommendation that 
James McAfee of Mount Sterling be proclaimed the 
Corn Cob Pipe of Honor winner for th-s month. That 
cob pipe is on Jim'-, desk righ^ now For bis unselfish 
service to th^ nlayers coaches and officials of his 
area the D''"chmi-i doffs h'- fedo-i to a chap who 
reflects ced't on h'mself and his school. 

Individual sports which are very important be- 
cause of their carry-over value into later life are 
getting increasing af^ention in Ken*ncky. Our citizens, 
who are retiring earlier a^H livin<j lo"'ger than in years 
past, must be reckoned with bv our leaders. 

The Dutchman had a conversa'ion with Fayette 
County's Judge Jnp Johnson who recognizes that more 
golf course'i which mav bo clayed wifh I'ttle exertion 
and maintained economically must come into existance 
in Kentucky. Look for Judge Johnson to get one of 
those par-3 courses like Fern Creek built somewhere 
in his county. 

Another mild form of exercise wh'ch is engaged 
in by several million in other riTts of the ivorld and 
our nation is lawn bowling. Kentucky's first lawn 
bowling green was dedicated in Jefferson County's 
Carrie Gaulber' Cox Park by Judge Marlow W. Cook 
in August. Already the game is oooular and hundreds 
of men and women in the sixty-five to eighty year old 
bracket are playing. 

A par 3 golf course and a lawn bowling green are 
easy possibilities in any Kentucky countv and make 
for a haooier community life. If you need some help 
or counsel in getting one started where you live, just 
call the Dutchman. 

Attention Indiana and Ohio officials! The Dutch- 



Page Six 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR SEPTEMBER. 19!i6 



man will conduct the clinics for the Indiana and Ohio 
High School Athletic Associations in Indianapohs on 
September 24th and Columbus on November 13th. 

Here's one of those little gems the Dutchman likes 
to close with sometimes — If you are big enough, your 
troubles will be smaller than you are. 



Minutes of Board Meeting 

(Continued from Page Two) 
Morton Combs, Don Davis, Ralph C. Dorsey, Sherman 
Gish, Preston Holland and Don R. Rawlings, Com- 
missioner Theo. A. Sanford, and Assistant Commis- 
sioner. J. B. Mansfield president. The invocation was 
given by the Commissioner. 

Ralph C. Dorsey moved, seconded by Don Davis, 
that the reading of the minutes of the June meeting be 
waived, since the members of the Board had received 
copies of these minuses. The motion was carried un- 
animously. 

President Sanders stated that he had been honored 
by the Board in being asked to serve as its president 
for the 1965-66 school year. He further stated his belief 
that the Association had made progress during the 
year, and he thanked the members of the Board for 
the cooperation which they had given him. 

President Sanders stated that the next order of 
business was the election of the president and vice- 
president of the Board of of Control. Preston Holland 
moved, seconded by Don R. Rawlings, that Sherman 
Gish and Don Davis be elected President and Vice- 
President of the Board of Control respectively by ac- 
clamation. The motion was carried, with Mr. Gish and 
Mr. Davis not voting. 

Mr. Holland made appropriate remarks on behalf 
of the Board concerning the leadership which has 
been given by President Sanders during the year just 
ended. Mr. G:sh accepted the Board presidency, stat- 
ing that it was his hope that the program of the As- 
sociation would continue to improve and expand, and 
pledging his efforts toward this goal. 

The Commissioner made a report to the Board 
on the receipts and disbursements during the year 
1955-66. Copies of the audit, recently prepared by 
Johncon and Lusk, of Louisville, Certified Public Ac- 
countants, had been mailed to the members of the 
Board. Don R. Rawlings moved, seconded by Preston 
Holland, that the financial report presented by the 
Commissioner be accepted. The motion was carried 
unanimously. 

Ralph C. Dorsey. official K.H.S.A A. delegate to 
the recent National Federation annual meeting, gave 
a very complete report on the meeeting. 

It was the decision of the Board members that 
the fall meeting of the Board of Control be held in 
Lexington on October 1. 

President Gish stated that an announcement con- 
cerning his 1966-67 committee appointments would be 
made at the time of the next Board meeting. 

The Commissioner called attention to the fact 
that the Board during its June meeting had suggested 
that he send out a questionnaire concerning the pos- 
sibility of setting up classes in Cross Country. He 
stated that a number of schools sponsoring Cross 
Country teams would not be known until administra- 
tors enroll their schools in the K.H.S.A.A. for the forth- 
coming school year, and that a questionnaire sent 
during the summer months might not result in com- 
plete information being received by the State Office. 
It was the opinion of aU Board members that the 
questionnaire conccerning Cross Country should not be 
mailed until aU schools had opened for the fall term, 
and that the possible classification of schools in Cross 



Country not be considered until the 1937 - 68 school 
year. 

There was a discussion concerning the possible 
addition of the Triple Jump to the list of events in 
Boys' Track. Foster J. Sanders moved, seconded by 
Ralph C. Dorsey, that the Triple Jumo be added to 
the list of events in Boys' Track. The motion was 
carried unanimously. 

Preston Holland moved, seconded by Don R. 
Rawlings, that all bills of the Association for the 
period beginning June 1, 1936, and ending June 30, 
1966, be allowed. The motion was carried unanimously. 

There being no further business, the meeting ad- 
journed. 



1-2-0-1 : Baker, 
Balkcom, 
Thomas, 
0-3-0-0 ; 
0-1-0-0 ; 
Bennett, 



Schools' Ratings on 
Basketball Officials 

The following: ratings were received on basketball officials 
registered with the K.H.S.A.A. during 1965-1966. The numbers 
following each name represent respectively the number of 
Excellent, Good, Fair, and Poor ratings given to the official. 

AbeU. Richard M., 1-1-4-1 : Abney, David W., 2-0-0-0 ; 
Adams. William M., 1-2-1-0 ; Akridge, Dean, 2-9-3-2 ; Alexand- 
er, Darryl, 3-6-2-1 : Alexander. Howard S.. 0-4-1-1 : Alexander, 
Rex, 9-14-3-4 : Alexander, Ronnie G., 0-1-1-0 ; Allen, Ed L., 
0-1-0-0 : Allen, Harry Gordon, 0-0-0-1 : Allen. James D., 0-2-1-0 ; 
Allen, James W., 1-1-0-0 : Allen, Lowry R., 7-42-2-0 : Allen, 
Nelson R., 16-17-7-6 ; Anders, Raleigh A., 2-4-1-0 : Anderson, 
Don. 2-0-1-0 ; Arbuekle. Kenneth E.. 0-12-2-1 ; Arflin. Tracy 
T., 0-1-0-0 : Ansmus, William H., 4-4-2-3 ; 

Bailey, Frank, 0-2-0-0 ; Baird. William, 
Billy B., 0-0-1-1 ; Baker, Robert M.. Jr., 1-6-3-2 : 
Otis, 0-1-0-0 : Ballaban, Thomas, 12-5-0-0 : Bankemper, 
1-11-0-1; Barker. Walter D., 5-3-0-1; Bates, Bob, 
Bates, Gardner, Jr., 10-10-3-0 ; Bates, Ronald B., 
Bell, Clarence T., 8-9-0-2 ; Bennett, Bob, 18-24-3-0 : 
Gene, 5-2-0-0 : Benzinger, Joseph. Jr., 2-10-2-0 ; Bero, James 
J., 2-0-0-0 ; Berry, William 2-3-0-1 ; Bibb, William C., 5-2-3-0 ; 
Bienick, Stanley, 0-2-0-0; Bishop, Heulyn, 15-18-5-3: Black- 
burn, Adrian, 1-6-4-1 : Bland. Kenneth E., 0-2-O-O : Blanken- 
ship, Zeb, 1-0-0-0 ; Blanton, Bob R., 1-1-0-0 : Blevins, Boone, 
Jr., 8-9-1-0 ; Blevins, Robert L., 3-2-0-0 ; Bowling, Roy, 9-5-1-0 ; 
Boyd. Jerry, 1-3-1-0 ; Boyles, Paul, 12-16-1-2 ; Bradshaw, Bill, 
3-4-0-1: Bradshaw, Frank C, C, 5-2-0-0- ; Bradshear, Loy Ray, 
13-22-3-5; Brizendine, Vic, 10-21-8-1: Brock, Alben, 2-11-2-1; 
Brock. John H., 4-4-1-1 : Brown, Billy C, 4-14-1-1 : Brown, 
E. C, 7-27-13-2: Brown, J. Carlton, 9-14-4-3: Brown, John W.. 

. Browning, Earl E., 15-24-7-6 ; Browning W. A., 

Brummett, Joseph W.. 8-10-6-4 : Bruner. Jack C, 

Buis, Nathaniel; 7-30-10-0: Burchett, Lanier, 

Burke, Harry R., 21-23-3-1 : Burkhart, James G., 

Butcher, Douglas, 16-19-2-0 ; Butcher, Granville, 17- 
18-6-2; Butler, Donald A., 2-1-1-0: Butler, Jack K., 2-0-0-0; 
Butler. Robert, 4-26-4-1 ; Butner, Billy M., 6-30-5-3 : 

Cain. Ron, 2-10-5-3 ; Caldwell, James A., 10-18-1-2 : Cali- 
tri, Donald Lvnn, 0-2-1-0 ; Callahan, Tom J., 2-11-2-0 : Camp- 
bell, George H., Jr., 4-4-4-0 ; Campbell. John, Jr.. 9-17-1-0 ; 
Canadv, Ray Blair. 11-13-7-0; Canter, John, 0-4-0-0; Cantrell, 
Hubert E., 4-1-0-0 ; Caple, Harold E., 4-25-4-3 : Carlberg, 
John H., 7-12-6-1 : Carney. Robert L.. 0-3-0-0 : Cartwright, 
James "Joe" 0-3-1-0 ; Caruso. Dick, 1-0-1-0 : Cash, Randall E., 
3-1-2-1 : Castle. Jack T., 3-10-2-1 : Castle. Quentin, 0-0-2-1 ; 
Chandler, Melvin P., 8-16-4-3 : Chaney, Bobby L., 5-18-4-3 ; 
Chinn. Mike, 1-1-1-0 : Cisco, Robert N., 7-5-3-3 ; Clardy, Barry 
D., 0-1-0-0 ; Clark, Kenneth R., 0-2-0-0 : Clark, Owen B.. 2-2- 
2-0 : Clark, Tom, 8-5-1-1 : Claypool, Thomas Wayne, 0-1-0-0 ; 
Clemmons, Sam, 1-4-0-0 ; Click, Edgle, 0-3-1-0 ; Click, Ezra F., 
0-4-1-4 : Cobb, Michael B., 2-10-7-3 : Cochran, Roy H., Jr.. 
2-4-5-1 ; Cole, Dickie, 3-8-10-1 : Coleman, Daniel Lee, 2-8-6-1 : 
Coleman, James E., 0-1-0-0; Colley, Lynn, 0-1-0-1; Collier, 
Burnard, 2-3-0-0 : Collier, Virgil, 0-0-1-1 : Collins, Jack, 0-1-1-0 ; 
Collins, C. E. "Jack", 3-2-2-3 ; Collins, Hubert, 8-23-4-1 ; Col- 
lins, Larry, 2-4-2-0: Combs, F. D., 11-12-2-0: Combs. John, 

Combs. Keith A., 10-12-2-0 : Combs, Wilmer Eugene, 
P., 13-8-3-1 : Conley, George, 4-1- 
1-1-0-0 : Conley, Ted L., 10-18-3-0 ; 
Cooksey, Marvin, 1-4-1-0 : Cooper, 
Warren, 13-1-0-0 : Copley, Sidney 
M., 8-3-0-4 : Cornelison, Walter L., 2-2-5-2 : Cornett. John M., 
3-1-0-0 : Correll, Elmer Eugene, 2-0-0-0 ; Cox, Alva J., 3-3-1-0 ; 
Cox, Colin. 3-4-0-2: Cox. Rufus A., 2-7-1-1; Craft, Bill, 0-4-0-2; 
Crager, Bobby F., 11-11-2-0: Crawford, Donald, 14-20-6-2; 
Creech, Robert Lee, 0-2-1-0 ; Creekmore, Ken, 2-3-2-0 : Croft, 
E. Lewis. 4-23-2-0 : Gulp Ronald D., 2-8-1-1 ; Gulp, Willard E., 
0-3-0-0 ; Cundiff, John, 0-8-4-0 ; Cunningham, Julian 
1-1 ; Curtis. Douglas E., 0-2-0-1 : 

Dame, L. J., 0-14-2-1 ; Daniel, Roger T. 



11-22-6-1 ; 
2-2-1-1 ; 
27-21-1-2 : 
8-16-2-0 ; 
3-3-2-4 ; 



1-2-1-0 : 
9-12-5-0: Condl-a, Kenneth 
0-0 : Conley, Lester "Art", 
Conn, Jerry L., 0-0-0-1 ; 
John F.. 0-1-3-1 ; Cooper. 



R., 6-4- 
1-2-3-0 ; Daniels, 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR SEPTEMBER. 19GG 



Page Seven 



Bob. 6-20-2-1 ; Dann, Nick. 6-3-1-1 : Daugherty, Elwood, 5-6-1-1 : 
Daum, Charles A.. 0-1-0-0 : Davenport. Bowman, 5-6-1-1 ; 
Davis. A. J., 0-1-0-0 : Davis. Harold T., 1-18-1-0 ; Davis Ralph 
C. 2-0-0-0 ; Davis, Ralph E.. 17-16-3-0 : Dawson. Alby, 3-1-0-0 ; 
Day, Bill. 9-21-7-5 ; Day, Jack L., 0-3-0-0 ; Day, G. C 0-1-0-0 ; 
Day, Jack L., 0-3-0-0 ; Day G. C, 0-1-0-0 : Deaton, Chas., 
Jr., 1-1-1-0; DeGroote. James A., 0-1-0-0: Delconte. 
Art, 4-8-1-0; Dement, Jerry D., 0-0-1-1; Denham, Ronald, 
1-31-10-3 ; Dennedy, Robert, 0-3-0-0 : Denney. Murrell C 0-3-2-3 ; 
Derrickson, Richard, 4-6-3-1; DeVary, Bill, 17-11-3-4; Dickson, 
Tom, 1-8-0-1 ; Dieterle, Owen, 4-14-6-4 : Dills, Bernie. 2-2-2-0 ; 
Dingus, Charles, O-O-l-O ; Disken, Jim, 0-7-2-0 ; Divine, Wayne 
L., 0-3-0-0; Dixon, Billy M.. 2-1-0-0; Dobson. Kenneth. 1-8-3-3; 
Doctor, R. P.. 0-2-0-0 ; Dorsey, James. 6-22-6-1 ; Dotson, John 
B., 0-1-0-1 ; Downey, James B., 0-2-2-1 ; Downey. Jim. 2-21- 
3-2; Drake. Dick. 10-34-3-2; Driskell, Earl, Jr.. 10-22-3-8; 
Duerson, William R., 9-20-2-2 ; Duff, Birchell, 8-3-2-0 ; Duff, 
Earl, 16-16-3-2 ; Dunaway, Adrian, 0-2-0-1 ; Duncan. Earl S., 
0-0-0-1; Duncil, Charles, 8-13-2-3: Durbin. Hade. Jr.. 11-18- 
1-1 ; Duvall, James W., 1-2-1-0 ; Duvall, Thomas Jay, Sr., 13- 
26-14-6 ; Dyer. Joe R., 6-15-2-0 ; 

Eades, Jimmie, 12-30-7-3 ; Edwards. Don A.. 36-39-1-0 : 
Ellington. James E., 2-16-3-4 ; Elliott, Carroll L., 21-27-8-9 ; 
Elliott, Eric, 1-2-2-1 ; Elliott, Humphrey T., 0-19-0-1 ; Ellis, 
Johnny, 0-2-1-0; Elmore. Jimmy A.. 2-2-1-0; Emery, George 
A., 1-0-0-0; England, Larry A., 0-1-0-0; Ernst, Edward R., 
0-4-0-0 ; Evans. Wade, 0-6-0-1 ; Everett. Billy N., 6-4-2-3 ; 

Farish, Merlin J., 5-5-3-2 : Farlee. Harold "Butch". 1-1- 
0-0; Farley, Jimmy. 12-2-3-3; Farmer. Biilie. 2-4-4-0: Farmer. 
Jack. 11-17-7-1; Ferrell, Doc, 36-11-3-2: Ferrell, Lewis Jimmy. 
0-3-4-0; Finley. Albert R.. 4-29-4-4; Finley, Ron, 6-13-0-1; 
Finley, Sam, 0-2-3-0 ; Flowers. Randal B., 1-4-1-1 ; Flynn. 
Robert D.. 32-21-7-2 ; Foster, Berryman E.. 1-3-2-0 ; Foster. 
Bob, 47-26-7-1 ; Foster, Joseph W., 1-1-6-0 ; Fowler. Ronald 
S.. 0-2-0-1 : Fraley, Bill, 1-8-2-0 ; Francis. Fred Louis, 1-5-2-2 : 
Francis, William Lewis, 0-0-2-0 ; Frazier, Roy D.. 0-1-0-0 : 
Fredericks, Rex, 3-13-1-0 : Freese, Oliver T.. 2-5-2-0 ; 
Freppon, Thomas E., 1-0-0-1 ; Frey, William R.. 0-3-0-0 : Fritz, 
Robert G.. 2-2-2-0 ; Fritz, Sherman, 25-39-12-3 ; Frye, Gil, 
7-18-5-3 ; Fryrear, David, 2-3-1-0 ; Fugate. E. Hugh. 3-1-1-0 ; 
Fuller, John R., Jr.. 5-16-5-2 : Furguson. William W.. 1-11-3-1 ; 

Gabbard, John B.. 2-1-2-1 ; Gaines. Curtis, 0-1-0-0 ; Gaines. 
Harvey, 0-2-1-0 ; Gaither. Gene. 6-22-2-3 ; Galuk. Walter M., 
6-16-3-1 : Gardner, E. Howard. 3-9-0-0 : Gentry. Dale J.. 1-7- 
0-0; Gettler. John F.. 0-13-6-6: Gibson. Carl. 0-5-0-0: 
Gibson, Fred W., 2-4-4-1 ; Gilbert. Gerald L., 34-35-3-1 ; Gilbert, 
Lawrence, "Butch", 6-8-0-0 ; Gilbert, William Curtis, 0-1-1-1 ; 
Gill. Joe, 2-1-2-2 ; Gilman, Ronald R., 1-5-0-0 ; Giordano. Al. 
1-2-1-0; Golden. Billy Joe. 80-20-1-1; Golev. Jim, 14-34-7-4; 
Gooch, Lloyd E., 3-12-6-0 ; Goodall, Walter J.. 1-6-3-1 : Goode, 
Earl A., 11-8-2-0; Gordon, Billy K., 3-4-0-0; Gordon. Levi J.. 
0-1-1-0 ; Gossett, Jack, 7-17-2-1 ; Gour, Bob, 12-30-6-0 : Cover, 
David B.. 0-18-12-4; Grace. Hickory, 10-4-2-0: Graham, Jim, 
3-7-2-1; Graham, Ronnie. 8-13-3-4; Graves, Preston H., 0-2-2-2; 
Gray, Raymond, 3-6-2-0; Green, Walt, 31-13-2-1; Greer, Tom, 
0-0-0-1 ; Griffin, Dennis B.. 0-0-1-0 : Griffith, Rudolph, Jr., 0-1- 
0-0; Grigsby, Pete, Jr., 9-14-2-0: Grote, Hal, 0-2-0-1; Gustaf- 
son, Al "Gus". 1-1-1-0 : 

Hagan. Joe "Red", 2-9-4-1 ; Hagedorn, Thomas. 3-8-4-0 : 
Hagen, William B., 1-0-0-0 ; Halbert, Hubert. 0-1-0-0 ; Hall. 
Billy Joe, 4-10-2-1 ; Hall. Dave. 0-1-0-0 : Hall. Elvis. 0-6-0-0 : 
Hall. Jack R., 3-1-0-0 ; Hall, Kenneth. 1-3-0-0 ; Hall, Mac, 
0-4-0-1 ; Hall, William W., 0-4-0-1 ; Ham, Ronald, 1-0-0-0 : 
Hamblin. Anthony. 0-0-1-0 : Hamm. Gerald, 6-29-8-5 ; Hamm, 
Harold D., 2-4-2-0 ; Hamm, L. E., 0-0-2-2 ; Hammons, Nor- 
man, 9-23-5-3 ; Hardin. Carl Ray, 0-6-3-5 ; Hardin, Don G., 
10-14-7-2; Hardin, William R.. 0-4-0-0; Harned. Vic. 29-16- 
4-1 ; Harper. Robie, Jr.. 31-21-2-1 ; Harrell, Bill D., 0-1-0-0 ; 
Harris, Billy, 2-15-5-2 ; Harris. Wayne, 0-2-0-0 ; Harrison John 
L., 10-13-3-1 ; Hatfield, Cecil E., 4-4-0-0 ; Hatfield, Dennis 
0-0-1-0 ; Hatler, Donald W., 0-6-2-0 : Hausfeld. Walter. 0-2-1-0 ■ 
Hawkins, Will A.. 0-0-1-0 ; Hayden, Samuel J.. 4-25-9-3 : Hay- 
don. Lloyd. 0-1-4-1 ; Haynes. John, 0-7-2-0 : Haynes. William 
T., 0-11-3-0: Heitzman, Warren E.. 1-2-1-0; Heldman. John. 
Jr.. 1-0-0-0; Henderson. Robert L.. 0-0-1-4; Hendon, Charles. 
0-2-0-0 ; Hendricks, Dudley, 0-1-0-0 ; Hennegan, J. E. Michael, 
2-0-1-0: Henson, Tony C. 4-12-6-2: Hewitt. B. T.. 17-31-4-7; 
Hicks. Floyd E., 0-6-0-0 ; Hill, Earl F., 9-24-6-0 ; Hines, Doug- 
las, 2-6-3-1 ; Hinton, Henry E., 8-13-2-1 ; Hisle, Charlie R., 
1-0-2-0; Hitt, Billy D.. 0-2-0-0; Hobbs. Charles V., 7-19-0-1; 
Hobbs, Wm. Paul, 0-1-0-0 : Hofstetter, Joe, 13-8-1-0 ; Holeman, 
Bill R., 3-9-2-0 ; Holland. David, 0-2-0-1 : Holland, David W., 
0-0-1-3; Holt, Robert E.. 0-6-1-1; Holthouser. Ora L.. 6-12-2-1; 
Hooks. Bob, 0-0-0-1 ; Hopkins, B. L., 1-3-8-3 : Horn, Everett, 
Jr.. 2-10-1-0: Howard. Bruce L.. 10-13-1-1: Howard Carl. 
2-23-6-3: Howard, Henry D., 0-1-0-0; Howard, Jimmy D., 0-8- 
0-0 ; Howard, Robert E.. 5-0-0-0 ; Hubson. Oscar. 1-0-0-0 ; Hud- 
nall, William. 0-1-0-0 ; Huff. Cordell. 7-6-4-6 : Hughes. Charles. 
15-6-2-1 ; Hughes. Paul P., 25-31-1-0 ; Huiet. Fred "Whitey". 
13-2-0-0; Hume Charles E.. 6-28-12-4; Hunley. Neil P., 12-19- 
3-0 : Hunt, Jack L., 3-2-0-0 ; Hurley, Robert, 0-6-1-1 : Hutchens 
Jim. 0-3-0-0 ; Huter. Jim, 2-4-0-1 ; Hyatt, Bob, 15-21-1-4 ; Hy- 
land, F. D., 1-2-0-0 ; 

Idol, Billy Joe. 6-3-4-3 ; Ingraham, Gary J., 1-1-0-0 ; 
Inman, Briscoe, 5-12-6-6 : Irwin, Charlie, 17-16-0-2 ; 

Jackson, Edward. 3-5-1-0 ; Jahnigen. Robert E., 1-0-0-0 ; 
James, Carl Edwin. 0-2-0-0 : James. Gene. 6-1-1-0 ; Jenkins. 
James D., 2-8-0-1 ; Jenkins, Kean, 4-4-0-0 ; Johns, Jerry, 0-0-1-0 ; 
Johnson, Harry B., 2-1-0-0 ; Johnson, Harvey K., 2-2-0-2 : 



Johnson, Jack D.. 2-7-1-0 ; Johnson, James M.. 6-20-4-0 ; John- 
son. Leroy. 0-2-3-0 : Johnson, Ronald L.. 1-1-3-0 ; Johnson, W. 
Bernard. 7-27-4-2 : Johnson, Walter. 37-28-4-0 ; Jones, G. Car- 
son. 6-14-5-2 : Jones. Joe S., 0-3-1-1 : Jones, John Howard, 
1-0-0-0 : Jones, Paul, 6-9-3-2 : Jones, Robert L.. Jr.. 1-1-0-0 ; 
Jones. William L., 9-9-2-0 : Judy, Carl D., 0-0-1-0 : 

Keatlev. James H.. 0-0-1-0 ; Keeton. C. E. "Buck". 2-5-5-1 ; 
Kelly. Charles R., 1-4-4-6 : Kelly, Robert J., Jr., 0-5-6-1 ; Kim- 
mel, Jerrv. 35-24-1-1 ; King. James A.. 26-27-1-2 : King. Ray- 
mond H., 0-1-0-0 : Kirkpatrick, Charlie V., 0-0-0-1 : Kloufetos, 
Spiro J., 2-4-4-2 : Knight, Bill, 8-28-1-4 ; Kuhl. Lawrence, 18- 
26-0-0 : 

Lambert. Irvin G., 3-9-1-1 : Larsen, George, 2-2-2-1 ; 
Laubheimer, Don T., 25-31-3-1 : Lawson, Rondell, 17-8-1-1 : 
Layne, Bert. 0-3-1-0 : Lee. Robert L.. 10-7-2-0 ; Lee, Thomas 
J.. 2-0-1-0 ; Lequire, Harold M., 15-10-2-0 : Lester. J. L., 0-5- 
2-1 : Lile, Clyde F., 0-4-1-1 ; List, Frank A., 20-13-0-2 : Long, 
Bill, 3-11-2-0; Long. Robert F.. 0-0-1-1; Longo. Dick. 7-0-0-2; 
Louden. Hubert C, 23-34-5-5 : Loudy, Kenneth, 19-17-3-1 ; 
Lowe, Gene T., 25-35-2-0 : Lowe, James D.. Jr.. 0-0-1-0 ; 
Lucas. Gene T., 16-12-1-2 : Lucas. Jack G.. 1-4-0-0 : Luebbers, 
Leonard,, 0-2-0-1 : Lusby, George. 0-1-0-0 : Lytle, William 
Price, 12-21-5-1 ; 

McAllister, Jack, 0-1-0-0 : McAnelly, David F., 4-16-3-0 ; 
McBride, W. Kenneth, :!-8-5-l ; McCargo, Frank, 10-24-4-5 ; 
McClure. William Scott, 16-21-6-1; McCowan, Connell, 1-2-1-0; 
McCoy, Hayse, 15-31-4-3 ; McGehee. Gordon. 12-23-2^0 : Mc 
Glasson, Galen, 1-8-1-1 : McGlothlin, Leonard, 0-1-0-0 : Mc- 
Guire. Herbert W., 1-4-3-1 ; McKenzie, Robert, 4-14-2-6 : Mc- 
Kenzie. Robert L., 0-1-0-0; McKinney, Adelle F., 0-3-0-0: Mc- 
Lane, Albert I., 36-36-4-5; McLean, Gordon, 22-15-3-2; Mc- 
Millin, Larry L., 1-0-0-0; McNamee, Jack, 0-3-1-0; MoPike, 
Ray S., Jr., 1-0-0-0 ; 

Madden, McElroy. 0-0-0-1 ; Madon, Robert Lee, 21-20-3-0 ; 
Mahan, Carle E. "Buddy". 24-13-2-3 : Maines, George E.. 22- 
26-10-6; Marshall. Glenn Roger. 0-0-0-2; Marshall. Tivis N., 
3-3-0-1 : Martin, Carl Thomas, 0-1-0-0 : Martin. Delano, 
0-1-0-0 : Martin, Sam, Jr. 3-7-0-1 ; Martin. Wilfred R., 0-0-1-0 ; 
Mashburn, Mendal Laine, 0-2-1-0 ; Mattingly. Bernard. 1-0-0-0 ; 
Mauney. Bill. 0-8-5-0 : May. E. B.. Jr., 22-24-0-3 : Mayes. Ed- 
ward. 4-7-6-3 ; Mayfield. Clarkie, 8-3-2-2 : Maynard, Joe E.. 
Dr.. 5-16-4-0 ; Maynard. John W.. 3-2-2-0 : Maynard, Kenneth. 
2-3-0-0 ; Maynard. Lonnie. 0-1-0-0 ; Meade, Foster "Sid". 30- 
9-4-3 ; Meadows. Marvin, 28-24-9-7 ; Meek, Walter E., 0-1-0-1 ; 
Meeks, Jack. 1-7-1-0 ; Melear, Leland, 0-3-0-0 : Meredith, Denny 
E.. Jr. 19-27-6-6: Metcalf. Earl L., 7-11-0-0: Metzger. Don, 
7-4-4-0 : Meyer, Bud. 1-6-3-0 ; Mickev. Elbert W., 0-1-0-0 : Mid- 
dleton, Johnny, 8-10-2-3 ; Milbern, Daniel L., 2-21-11-0 ; Miles, 
Marvin. 0-0-1-1 ; Miles. Robert J.. 0-1-0-1 : Miller. Bob, 24-13- 
0-0 : Miller, Ferrel, 6-14-4-3 ; Miller, John D.. 4-1-0-1 ; Miller, 
L. O.. Jr.. 4-27-0-0 ; Miller, Rex J.. 1-3-2-1 : Miller. Victor 
Leon. 3-5-1-0 : Miracle, Ed. 2-4-6-0 : Mitchell. William N., 
15-21-0-1 ; Monahan, Ed., 2-0-1-0 ; Montgomery, Chester. 23-29- 
2-1 : Montgomery, Gordon D.. 0-1-0-0 : Moonevhan. James H.. 
2-4-:!-0; Moore. James H.. 1-0-0-0; Moore. Robert. 15-38-7-4; 
Moore. Roy. 8-14-2-1 : Morris. Charles. 2-0-0-0 : Morse, Richard 
K.. 25-28-12-3 ; Moser. Rudy Clay. 28-46-0-0 : Mudd. Ed. 13- 
13-5-3 : Mulligan. J. T.. 0-9-3-1 ; Munk. McKee, 0-1-0-0 ; Mur- 
ray, William D.. 0-2-0-0 ; Murrell. Allen L.. 5-19-3-3 ; 

Namciu. John. 0-4-1-1 ; Nash. Dennis B.. 6-17-4-3 : Neal, 
Gene, 9-24-6-1 ; Neal, James, 0-7-2-0 ; Nevil. Vernon E.. 5-16- 
8-2 ; Newman. Bill, 8-2-1-0 ; Newman, Larry. 1-1-1-1 : New- 
some. Lawrence. 1-0-0-0 : Nixon, James W.. 9-33-5-6 ; Nord, 
Ed. 15-28-3-0 ; Norwood, Donald V., 0-0-1-0 ; Norwood, Thomas 
R.. 2-4-2-0 : 

Oldham, H. John. 1-2-1-2 ; Omer. Harold G.. 5-2-3-3 ; O'- 
Nan. Harold L.. 0-5-1-0 ; O'Nan. Norman. 4-19-2-0 ; Osborne, 
Larry Joe. 0-4-0-0 : Osborne. Virgil F.. 8-5-0-0 : Overton, 
Frank. Jr. 0-0-1-0 : Owens. Bruce E., 2-1-0-0 : Owens, Thomas 
J., 0-0-0-1 ; 

Pace. Donald, 0-0-1-0 ; Pack, Donald. 7-9-2-0 ; Pack. 
James. 32-37-2-6 ; Padgett, R. K.. 3-14-1-0 : Page, Richard, 
0-1-2-0 : Pardue. Robert E.. 1-1-0-0 ; Park, J. M., 4-6-5-4 ; 
Parker, Joseph H., 0-2-0-0 ; Parrish, Dale, 2-3-1-0 : Parrott, 
Lanny L.. 24-8-2-1 : Parson. Roy, 0-0-0-2 ; Patterson. Bill, 
0-2-2-0 : Payne, Gayle, 2-7-1-0 ; Pearson. Ozias. 0-3-0-0 : Peay, 
Curtis, E.. 0-3-0-3 : Peck. Harold. 1-1-1-0 : Peecher. W. Lloyd, 
0-3-1-0 ; Peeno, Harry, 0-8-1-0 : Pelphrey, Jack, 8-9-0-0 ; Pence. 
Charles E.. 1-5-0-2 ; Pence. William Jerry, 0-1-0-0 ; Penix. Ho- 
bert. Ferrell. 16-14-6-0: Penrod, Joe B., 2-12-5-1: Pergrem, 
Bernard "Nard", 17-10-1-0 ; Perkins, James Ernest. 3-3-2-2 ; 
Perry. James E.. 7-23-2-1 ; Peters. Arthur, 1-0-2-0 ; Petett, 
Frank M., 2-0-2-0; Phelps. Ralph "Rudy", 18-17-6-1; Phelps, 
Ray, 4-4-3-0 ; Pieratt, Hollie E.. Jr.. 0-1-1-0 ; Pietrowski, Paul, 
1-3-0-0 : Ping, Denton Perry, 0-3-3-0 ; Pogue, Ivan G.. 2-16-4-2 ; 
Points. Charles, 2-19-2-1 ; Pollock, Carl L.. 1-0-0-0 ; Polston, 
Billy Dale, 0-1-0-2 ; Poppas, Nickolas, 2-0-3-1 : Powell, Logan, 
2-2-0-0 : Prater, Rondel R.. 1-3-0-0 ; Prather, Bill, 17-19-4-3 ; 
Prewitt, Allan. 1-1-0-0 ; Price. Charles A., 1-5-3-0 ; Price, 
James E., 3-24-5-0 ; Profitt, Lawrence K., 0-0-1-0 ; Purcell, 
Billy D.. 0-3-3-0 ; 

Rader. Douglas. 14-6-4-2 : Radjunas, Eddie, 1-7-0-0 : Rad- 
junas, Stan, 6-5-1-0 ; Raikes, Larry D., 6-2-2-0 ; Rainey, 
Jimmy, 8-5-1-1 : Rakel, Bob, 4-6-1-1 ; Ramey. Herbert Dean. 
2-7-2-1 ; Rankin. James M.. 0-1-0-0 ; Rawlings. Harold. 4-8-3-1 ; 
Rawlings. Charles, 1-3-3-0 ; Reed. Charles R.. 27-2:5-4-2 ; Reed. 
Gordon "Moe". 25-20-6-1 ; Reinhardt. Myron Stanley. 40-26- 
2-0 ; Reschar, John V., Sr.. 0-1-0-0 : Rexroat. Jerry Lawrence, 
4-13-4-0; Rhodes, Cecil, 5-13-4-3; Rice, William, Jr., 0-2-0-0; 



Page Eight 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR SEPTEMBER, 1966 



Rice. William L., 2-1-0-0: Richardson. Charles E.. 5-3-1-11: 
Rickard. Bob, l-G-O-O ; Ricketts. Claude O., 10-30-9-5 : Rif- 
gins, Jason M.. 1-1-0-0 : Riggs. Floyd L., 2-6-2-0 : Ring, Bill. 
lS-12-1-4: Rister. Edgar L., 15-16-4-2: Ritter, Goebel, 14-1-0-0: 
Robertson. William R., 0-1-3-1 : Robinson. Don L.. 2-7-1-0 : 
Robv, Joseph L.. 1-19-2-0: Roeckers, Bernie, 0-3-0-0: Roesel, 
Joseph. 0-2-1-0 : Rogers, Howard D., 30-26-2-1 : Roller, Otis C 
2-7-0-1 : Rolph, Harold J., 3-1-0-1 : Romer. Dick, 2-2-1-0 ; Rose, 
Bernard. 0-0-2-0 : Rose, Wally, 11-7-1-1 : Rossman, Robert L., 
0-1-0-0: Rothfuss, Richard, 0-1-0-0: Rowe, Steve, 0-1-1-0; 
Rubarts. Leland C, 1-22-4-2 : Runyon, Tommy Dean. 3-6-1-1 : 
Rush. Rex E., 0-0-1-1 ; Russell, Allen, 19-32-0-0 ; Russell, Joe, 
8-11-4-3 : 

Sagers, Robert M.. 2-2-1-1 : St. Clair. Robert L., Jr., 29-13- 
4-1 : Salyer. Henry E., 0-6-3-1 : Sams, Glenn, 0-1-0-1 : Sanders. 
MeU 7-7-0-0 : Savior. Lanny R., 3-1-1-0 : Schad, Jim, 0-4-0-2 : 
Schlich. Paul E., 10-18-2-4: Scott, Craig, 1-3-0-0: Scott, Ken- 
neth E., 2-0-1-0: Scott, Sidney. 0-1-2-2: Seavers. Joe, 0-1-0-0; 
Sellier, Ed, 4-7-0-2: Selvy, Curt, 11-6-0-0: Settle, Boy G., 
21-16-4-1 : Sexton. Steven C. 9-5-1-0 : Sharp. Lloyd. 9-15-2-3 : 
Shartzer, E. Philip. S-9-3-0 ; Shaw. Earl. 34-28-3-2 : Sherrow, 
Winston G., 2-5-2-0 : Shewcraft, Clifford W., 0-1-0-1 : Ship- 
lev. Charles. 1-0-2-0 ; Shope. Lowell M.. 2-4-0-0 : Showalter, 
John. 0-1-0-1: Shuck, Thomas G., 11-19-5-0: Silliman, Wm. 
Gerald, 1-7-0-5 : Simpson, Fred C, 2-5-3-3 : Sims, Frank D., 
6-7-1-1 : Singleton. Bobby. 2-6-5-1 : Singleton, Ronnie H., 0-2- 
0-1 : Sizemore. Aster, 1-2-1-0 : Slinker. Dennis R., 0-1-0-0 ; 
Small Bill, 10-11-5-2: Smith, C. W., 0-1-0-0: Smith, Edgar J.. 
0-1-0-0 : Smith, Elijah. 0-1-0-0 : Smith, Jack David, 1-1-0-1 ; 
Smith, Rov M., 1-15-2-1 ; Smith. W. Jack, 21-33-5-1 : Smith, 
Wavne N., 39-11-3-0 : Smith, Willard N., 40-13-3-0 ; Smith, 
William E.. 0-2-2-0 ; Smithson. Richard A.. 22-30-4-4 ; Snorton, 
Claude, Jr.. 0-0-1-0 : Solomon. Jim, 6-14-1-0 : South. Douglas 
E., 1-0-0-0 : Sparks, Bobby. 0-4-0-0 ; Sparks, Keith Em- 
anuel. Jr.. 0-1-0-0 : Spaulding, Stan, 4-8-0-1 : Speck, Michael 
E., 14-38-6-8: Spencer. Irv. 16-28-7-4: Spiceland, S. E., 3-18- 
2-0 ; Spoonamore, Jim, 2-23-5-1 : Stauffer. Frank. 0-2-0-0 ; 
Steenken, William R.. 3-11-0-0 : Stephens. Herbert D., 1-1-1-2 : 
Stephenson, Harry. 3-8-0-0 ; Stephenson. Thomas H.. 0-1-2-2 ; 
Stethen. Jim, 1-6-1-4 : Stevens Alex, 6-9-0-0 ; Stevens, James 
L., 0-0-1-0 : Stewart. E. James, 0-0-1-0 ; Stiff. Maurice, 21-28- 
9-2 : Strikeleather, Clvde L., 13-18-1-1 : Stines, Ray A., 2-8-2-1 ; 
Stinson, Charles L.. 1-2-0-0 : Stith, Houston. 19-23-4-2 : Stoess, 
Henrv L.. 7-6-0-3 : Stokes, Bob, 7-9-0-2 : Stokes, Tommy G., 
1-0-0-0: Stokes, William R.. 1-0-0-0: Strain. Richard. 10-20- 
5-1 : Strong, Arnett, 54-16-1-0 ; Sucietto. Richard, 0-4-1-1 : Sul- 
livan, Don Chris, 26-15-3-3 : Summers. Charles R.. 0-0-1-0 ; 
Sumner. Carl. 1-2-0-0 : Sutphin, William O., 0-1-0-0 ; Switzer, 
Richard J., Jr., 0-8-5-0 ; 

Tackett, Jav. 3-1-0-1 ; Tackett, Layne, 1-4-1-2 : Tarlton, 
Thomas, 5-9-6-3 : Taylor, Billy Joe, 1-0-0-0 ; Taylor, Ed, 16-18- 
0-1 : Taylor, Frank, 1-1-0-0 : Taylor, Rogers E.. 9-12-0-0 ; 
Thomas, Frank M., 0-1-1-0 : Thomas James E.. 0-0-1-2 ; 
Thomason, Bennett. 2-5-2-0 : Thompson. Allen, 0-0-1-0 : Thomp- 
son, Houston, 0-2-2-0 : Thompson, Jack, 0-7-2-1 : Thompson, 
Kenneth Edward, 5-4-0-0 : Thompson. Ralph, 0-3-2-0 ; Thomp- 
son, Thomas A., 19-11-4-1: Thompson. Tom D., 3-3-0-1; Tins- 
ley, Marion F., 14-28-6-4 : Todd, Paul, 0-0-1-0 ; Torian, Virgil, 
Jr., 0-0-1-0 : Travis, Tom A., 0-0-1-0 : Trimer, Norman E., 
2-5-2-2 ; Triplett, Herb, 52-16-1-0 : Trout. Justin. D., 0-2-0-1 : 
Tullv, Pat. 13-12-2-0 ; Turner. Aaron, 5-9-4-1 : Turner, Bruce. 
1-2-0-0 : Turner, James W., 0-2-0-0 ; Tyre, Donald. 8-10-1-2 ; 

Urlage, Richard, 4-18-1-0 ; 

Vanover, J. W., 4-12-2-0 : Vannerson, Duke, 0-10-3-2 : Van- 
over, Walter S.. 5-7-1-0 ; VanZant, Jim. 18-14-0-0 ; Varble, 
William, 0-11-5-0 : Vaughan, Ronald. 0-1-0-0 : Vaughn, Teddy 
Rav, 3-6-5-1 : Vermillion. C. D., 7-12-6-1 : Vescovi, Raymond 
B.. 4-8-1-0 : Vice. Charles C... 0-3-1-0 : Vincent, Johnny, 9-3- 
0-0 : Vincent. Johnny B.. 2-9-5-1 ; 

Wagner, Marvin Rudy, 4-14-1-1 : Waide, Harry D., 0-5-1-0 ; 
Wa'llen, Howard W.. 0-2-0-0; Waller, Bobbie E.. 13-19-11-4; 
Walsh, Bernard N.. 0-1-1-0; Walton. Roy, 4-11-4-0: Ward, 
Robert L., 2-13-2-1 : Warfield. James A.. 1-0-0-0 ; Warner, 
Marvin. 0-1-0-0 ; Warrix, Lewis H.. 7-9-3-1 ; Watts, Paul A., 
3-6-3-2 : Wearren. Wade H.. 2-5-1-1 : Weathers. Charles, Jr.. 
1-3-2-0 ; Weaver. Rav, 4-17-0-9 ; Weiner, Dick, 1-8-0-1 ; Welch, 
Bill, 0-2-1-1 ; Wells, Glenn. 1-1-0-0 : Wells, Milford, 1-0-0-0 ; 
Wesche. James A.. 1-1-0-0 ; West. John. 5-16-4-2 ; Weyer. James 
G.. 0-9-1-0; Wheeler, Joe, 0-0-1-0: White, Billy Dean, 0-0-1-0; 
White, Carl W.. 0-1-0-0 ; White. David B.. 4-7-7-1 ; White, 
Nelson H., 3-0-1-0 : Wickham. James Robert, 6-9-5-2 : Willett. 
Art. 2-1-0-1 : Willey. Harold L., 1-1-0-0 ; Williams, Benny 
D., 0-1-0-0 : Williams. Bobby, 0-3-0-0 ; Williams. Jack S., 7-9- 
5-0 : Williams. Jack A., 0-6-0-0 ; Williams, James H., 0-3-0-0 ; 
Williams, Paul W.. 5-2-0-0 ; Williams, Roger, 13-15-5-2 ; 
Williams, Smythe Jack. 0-1-0-0 ; Williams, Tex M., 1-0-0-0 ; 
Williams, Willie H., 0-1-0-0 : Williamson, Fred, 0-1-0-0 : Willis, 
Robert A., 2-0-3-1 : Winchester, Roy L., 33-23-1-1 : Winfrey, 
Shelby, 25-16-3-1 : Wingfield, Felix G., 2-5-0-0 ; Winnecke, John 
E.. 0-1-0-0: Wirtz. Howard A., 6-11-2-2; Wirtz, Leonard F., 
2-0-0-0 : Wise, Billy V., 21-16-1-0 ; Wise, Jack, 29-12-3-2 ; 
Withrow, Raymond. 5-8-2-0 : Wolfe. Paul A.. 1-2-0-0 : Wolfe, 
Roger, 0-3-2-0 ; Wood, James Randall. 0-1-0-0 : Woods. Gene 
B.. 8-12-5-1 : Woodward, Billy, 3-17-0-2 ; Wooslev, Travis, 6- 
34-4-2 : Wooton, George B., 0-1-1-0 : Woprice. Ronald J., 0-4- 
0-0 : Wray. Robert, 0-4-0-0 : Wright, Billy J., 6-6-9-0 : Wright, 
H. W., Jr., l-l-l-ll ; Wright, Larry L.. 1-1-0-0 : Wurtz, Emil. 
0-1-0-0 ; 

Yates, Virgil, 0-1-0-0 ; Yelton. Gene B., 3-1-0-1 . 



Regi 



istered Football Officials 
of the K.H.S.A.A. — 1966 

(List Compiled September 1) 

If the telephone number is given for an official listed, 
it is the home phone number unless otherwise designated. If 
two numbers are given, the first number is that of the home 
phone. 

Adams. Calvin K., 5891-B Adams, Fort Knox, 4-8287, 4-3354 
Adams, Charles David, 5702 Indian Rock Rd., Louisville, 964- 

6419 
Albright. James R., Route No. 3, Shelbyville, 633-4614 Frank- 
fort, 564-3256 
Allen, Clyde E., Jr., 5215 Coolbrook Rd., Fern Creek, 239-0190, 

Chicago 372-6969 
Allison, Roy. Entrada Dr., Route 3, Frankfort, 564-3740 (Bus.) 
Anders. Raleigh A., General Delivery, Corbin, 528-2861, 528-3912 
Anderson, Glenn S., Jr., Box 323. Prestonsburg. 886-2106, 

886-3981 
Argo, Charles, 523 Bailey, McKenzie, Tennessee. 352-2572, 

686-1531 ext. 3239 
Atkinson, Charlie, 50 Queen Ave., Lexington. 252-3298. 252-2626 
Ayres. Edward L., 626 Laramie Road, Lexington, 277-2333, 

277-1161 
Ballaban, Thomas, 1103 Archland Dr., Cincinnati, Ohio, 622- 

3024. 761-7600 
Barlow, Bill, Box 214. Millei-sburg 
Bartels, John. 423 Third St., Dayton, 581-4250 
Battisti, Edward A.. 7759-A Littlefield Loop. Fort Knox, 

4-3790. 4-3354 
Beck, C. Norman, 2688 Filson Ave., Louisville, ME 4-1737, JU 

2-3511 ext. 362 
Beheler. Donald S.. 311 Springhill Dr., Paris, 987-1728, 252- 

2250 ext. 3236 
Bell. Clarence T., 1228 So. 41st.. Louisville. 778-7792, 582-5573 
Bennett, Howard. Route No. 6. Mayfield, 247-3309, 247-3510 
Benzinger, Joseph. 3502 Behymer Rd., Cincinnati, Ohio, 752- 

3932, 742-2191 
Bero. James J.. Box 968. Williamson, W. Va. 
Berger, John D., Jr., 26 Myers Lane. Allison Park, Pa., 767- 

4931, 621-3600, ext. 264 
Bivins, George W., 3105 Talisman Rd.. Louisville, 459-6111, 

895-0525 
Blackburn. Adrian. 407 Scott Ct.. Prestonsburg, 886-2401 
Blackburn. Tennyson, Box 2157, Williamson, W. Va. 
Blanton. Homer. 138 New Hampshire. Ashland, 324-1730, 324- 

4645 
Blosser. Kermit A., 80 Maplewood Dr.. Athens, Ohio, 693-3007, 

594-6452 
Bocook, Earl, 1103 Beech St., Kenova, W. Va. 
Boeh, Bill, 3804 McNicholas Ave., Deer Park, Ohio, 791-8880, 

821-9400 
Boemker. Bob. 69 Thompson Ave., South Ft. Mitchell, 331-1708. 

721-2700 ext. 350 
Bordy. Philip, 3308 Stratford, Louisville, 458-7005, 582-3994 
Bostick, Lord M., Jr., 419 West 12th St., Bowling Green, 843- 

3319, 843-6573 
Bowman, Earl G., 689 Mt. Vernon Rd., Lexington, 266-8111, 

277-7157 
Bovles. Jerry F., 2700 Algonquin Ave., Ashland, 324-6995, 

324-1111 ext. 5443 
Brashear, Loy Ray, Route 1, Glendale, 854-2921, Radcliff 361- 

3147 
Brizendine, Vic, 2711 Lakeside Drive, Louisville, 454-6843, 

589-9111 
Brock, John H., 611 Virginia Ave., Pineville, 337-2453, 337-2439 
Brotzge. Maurice J., 3712 Lexington Rd.. Louisville, 893-7206, 

896-4461 
Brown, Bill, 2553 Dell Road. Louisville, 458-4857, 583-0681 
Brown, Herman G., Route No. 2, Shelbyville. 633-2516, Louis- 
Bryant. Rudy C, 1924 Goldsmith Lane. Apt. No. 20, Louis- 
ville. 458-7285. 682-1881 

ville 589-9177 
Bullock. Edmund T., 2622 Claysmill Rd., Lexington, 277-0145, 

252-7963 
Bunch. William O.. 4820-D Lee Village, Fort Campbell, 798- 

3993 (Bus.) 
Bunn. Gary L.. 2718 First Ave.. Huntington. W. Va. 
Burke. Daniel F.. 1116 Maureen Lane. Cincinnati. Ohio. 471- 

9631. 621-7411 
Burke, David Dean. 3137 Carter Ave.. Ashland. 324-8846 
Burke, Harry, 328 Arnold Ave.. Prestonsburg, TU 6-2796, TU 

6-2385 
Burkhart, James G.. Box 169. Loyall. 573-1437. 664-3444 
Burton. James Edward. 401 Barbour, Providence, 667-2296. 

669-4206 
Butler. Robert, 1330 Maple Ave., Owensboro, 684-7016, 684- 

5285 
Carr, Billy W.. Longview Drive, Franklin, 586-6355 
Cain. John Wiley. 226 Field St.. Cumberland. 589-4102 
Cain, Paul D.. 3196 Lookout Circle, Cincinnati, Ohio, 321-7246, 

871-6103 
Carr, Virgil Lee, 2924 Fitzwater Drive, South Charleston, 

W. Va. 
Canaday, Jacy Glenn, 503 Brown, Vine Grove, 877-6387, 877-5537 
Cannon. Jerry, Box 326, Sharon. Tennessee. 456-2431. 696-5521 
Canter, John, 2826 Esther Blvd., Louisville, 451-8218, 587-8862 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR SEPTEMBER, 19o6 



Page Nine 



Canady. Ray Blair, Court Square, Box 244, Barbourville, 546- 

4765, 564-3801 
Carlberg, John H., Box 234, Muldrauijh, 942-2723 
Carlson, David A., 2916 Washington, Paducah. 444-7943, 444- 

6311 ext. 408 
Carroll, Jerry R., 2323 23rd St., Nitro, W. Va. 
Carroll, John Wiley, 226 Field St,, Cumberland, 589-4102 
Cassell, David F., 7413 Lorenzo Lane, Louisville, 239-9165 
Cecil, A. Morris, 14 Shaw Lane, Ft. Thomas, 441-8427, 381-1480 
Chattin, Ernest P., 615 17th St., Ashland, 324-2665, 324-6191 
Chinn, Mike, 725 Scherm Rd., Owensboro. 684-0637, 684-2332 
Cbinn, Ralph, 3205 Hampton St., Ashland, 324-0683 
Cisco, Robert N., 403 Highland Ave.. Vine Grove, 877-6548, 

Ft. Knox 4-4445 
Clark, Charles L., 2315 Brighton Drive, Louisville, 459-3540 
Clark. Owen B., 106 Kentucky Ave., Georgetown, 863-3719, 

Nicholasville. 885-4157, Lexington, 252-8717 
Clemmons. Sam, 635 Central Ave., Lexington, 255-3562, 255- 

5735 
Clusky, Joe, Box 296, Red Jacket, W. Va. 
Cochran, Roy H., Jr.. 713 Caldwell, Corbin, 528-1697, London 

864-4330 
Collins, C. E. "Jack", 35 Rosehill Dr., Clarksville, Tenn.. 647- 

0154, 798-4411 
Collins, Jack, 8333 Jadwin Drive, Cincinnati, Ohio, 821-7791. 

621-4950 
Cook, Richard N., 931 Maple Ave., Dayton, 291-6880, 243-3531 
Cox, Jerry H.. Route No. 2, Rineyville, 765-7674, 4-7756 
Crace, James E., 892 Orchard Park Rd., Hurricane, W. Va. 
Craft, Albert B., 345 Glendale Ave., Lexington, 254-5365, 254- 

0764 
Craft, Bill, 140 Vanderbilt. Lexington, 277-4843, 277-3737 
Crider, Ray, 1120 Franelm Rd., Louisville, 368-1196 
Crosthwaite, John S., Jr., 8139 Elbow Lane N., St. Peters- 
burg, Fla., 344-7651, 898-2141 
Cullen, Charles E., 3010 Don Dee Drive, Louisville, 451-3322, 

895-0525 
Cullum, Harold D., 3943 Rhodes Ave., New Boston, Ohio 406- 

5229, 456-4559 
Culp, Willard E., 318 Skyline Park Dr., Hopkinsville, 886- 

7967, 798-5861 
Curnutte, James R., 201 East Eighth Ave., Huntington, W. Va. 
Current, Ellis Ray, 1933 Bellefonte Drive, Lexington, 277- 

1049, 252-2200 ext. 2300 
Dallmann, James W.. 12 Center St.. Jeffersonville. Ind., 283- 

7255 
Damron. Walter Louis, Route 2, Martin, Tenn. 
Daniel, Ernest H., 2317 Bath Ave.. Ashland, 324-2785, 324- 

1155 ext. 2521 
Davis, Clyde E., 2531 East Euclid Ave., Ashland, 324-2804. 

325-7145 
Davis, Curt, 1119 E. Burnett, Louisville, ME 4-4959. JU 2-3511 
Davis. Ralph C. 1326 South 7th St.. Ironton. Ohio, 632-8606. 

532-8143 
Deaton. Daniel E.. Matewan. W. Va. 
DeMuth. Paul E.. 609 Yancy Ln.. Louisville, 895-2522. WH 5- 

5237 
Dennedy. T. Robert. 5083 Orangelawn. Cincinnati, Ohio. 922- 

8352. 922-2300 
Dent. Donald L., 1746 Dixdale. Louisville. 776-3573. 366-4551 
Denton. Charles. 127 So. Hubbard Lane. Henderson, 826-4020. 

826-9533 
Denton. William J., 303 Bakers Court, Louisville. 366-7876. 

584-9271 
DeWitt. Maurice C, 527 Elm Tree Lane. Lexington. 252-0641. 

252-0641 
Dial, Charles R., 3300 Monel Ave.. Huntington, W. Va. 
Dial, Jack W., 3179 Sumner Ave., Huntington. W. Va. 
Dizney. Alan. 206 4th. Corbin 
Doll, Louis E.. 12152 Chesterdale Rd., Cincinnati, Ohio, 771- 

3412, 761-4210 
Donald, Edward W.. 4098 Farragut St.. Fort Knox. 4-6872. 4- 

6950 
Dorsey. James. 4062 Vinedale Ave.. Cincinnati. Ohio, 471-8050 
Dosek. Jerome J.. 345-Navaho Trail. Huntington. W. Vi. r.25- 

1937. 525-2274 
Downey, Robert F.. 327 — 26th St.. Dunbar, W. Va. 
Downs. Joseph W.. 829 Bartley, Bardstown. 348-5123 
Drake. Richard R., 72 Donnelly Dr.. Ft. Thomas, 441-4235 
Draud. Jon E.. 2441 Alexander Pk., Southgate. 441-0223 
Duff. Earl, 218 Lyttle Blvd., Hazard, 436-2725, 436-3136 
Eads, James Robert, 2177 Cypress Drive, Lexington. 278-4363. 

255-1320 
Eastham. Everett. Jr.. Route No. 1, Box 226, Kenova, W. Va. 
Edwards, Ernest S., Jr., 8235 39th St., Louisville. 774-5496, 

584-0201 
Edwards, Sonny, 508 Jefferson Ave., Milton, W. Va. 
Elliott, Carroll L., 307 College St., Elizabethtown 765-4007, 

765-6118 
Ellis. Johnny. Box 331. Prestonsburg. 6-2751. 6-3080 
Elovitz. Carl, 1920 Spring Grove. Lexington. 277-3994. 873-4901 
Engle. Orville. 128 Oak St.. Pineville. 7-2916 
Fallon. Robert James. 142 Pear St.. Hazard. 436-4528. 436-2151 
Fandrich. William. Murray 
Farina. Lawrence. 1680 Newbrook Dr. Cincinnati, Ohio. 522- 

5863. 243-3318 
Farish. Merlin J.. 1754 Genung Drive. New Albany, Indiana, 

945-0863, Brandenburg 422-2161 
Faust, Jack, 2427 Concord Drive, Louisville, 634-4204, 584-6236 



Fay, John C, 142 B Woodford Drive, Lexington, 255-6010, >:;t. 

219 (Bus.) 
Fenimore, Clarke E., 3943 Kennison Ave., Louisville, 896-4716, 

BU 2-1301 
Fenton, Don J., 4890 Oaklawn Drive, Cincinnati, Ohio, 271- 

3792, 751-4344 
Ferguson, Jesse S., 1719 Model Road, Louisville, 774-2831. 778- 

2731 ext. 386 
Fields, Ronald M., 1039 Madison, Henderson, 826-9859, 826-8381 
Fish, Leland G., 826 Oak Hill, Lexington. 255-7156, 254-7080 

ext. 7535 
Fletcher, John L., 5723-B Brown St., Ft. Knox, 4-2079, 4-2052 
Florence, Robert H., 308 N. 36th St., Paducah, 444-7489. 444- 

9691 
Flowers, James C, 3508 Canterberry Dr., Jeffersontown, 267- 

7261, 582-2281 
Forbes, J. W. "Jack", 4316 Dannywood Rd., Louisville, 454- 

6025. 778-2731 
Fortney, Robert L., 2817 Breckinridge Lane, Louisville, 458- 

1079, 582-3511 ext. 472 
Foster, Berryman E., 927 Waverly Drive. Lexington. 255- 

7783. 264-7080 
Foster. J. W.. 176 Market St.. Lexington, 254-3670. 255-6666 

ext. 5253 
Fraley, Bill. 1604 Lee Drive. Henderson. VA 7-3232. VA 6-2601 
Frankel, Louis S., 3723 Stanton Blvd.. Louisville. 454-6519. 

454-6519 
Franklin. James A.. 2913 Hackworth St., Ashland, 325-3934, 

324-1111 ext. 5630 
F-azer -^ Rn" 'P ? Main St.. Sturgis, 333-4412. 333-4672 
Freese, Ollie, 5518 Mapleridge, Cincinnati. Ohio, 561-5398, 351- 

7010 
Fruit, William E., Box 504, Henderson, VA 7-3540 
Fryrear, William P., 3012 Nadina Drive, Louisville, 459-3042. 

454-7611 ext. 4162 
Fucci. Dominic A.. 752 Wellington. Lexington. 277-6327. 254- 

8030 
Fugate, E. Hugh. 329 Mockingbird Drive. Frankfort, 223-1340, 

564-3990 
Fuller. Wilton Hope. 533 Hill-n-Dale Drive. Lexington. 277- 

6654. 266-0115 
Galuk. Walter M.. 3333 Central Ave., Ashland. 325-3305, 325- 

1751 
Garrett, Richard A., Lexington Theological Seminary. Lexing- 
ton. 265-4765 
Gentry. Dale J., 4945 Determine Lane, Louisville, 447-5981, 

585-5814 
Gettler, John F., 705 Providence Rd., Lexington. 266-4801, 

252-5494 
Gilbert. Gerald L., Box 51. Elizabethtown, 765-6704. Ft. Knox 

4-7719 
Gilbert. James D.. 2248 Citation, Owensboro 
Gilbert. Wm. C. 702 Otter Creek Rd., Vine Grove 
Gilman. Ronald R., Route No. 1, Box 183. Delbarton. W. Va. 
Golden. Billy Joe. 436 East Main St., Lynch, 848-2512 
Gorham. Harry C, 117 Hamilton Park, Lexington, 255-4257, 

299-6214 
Gour, Bob, 218 South Lee St., Bowling Green, 843-9582, 745- 

4293 
Grace, Charles K., Cypress St., Pineville, 337-3331, 337-2348 
Grady, Clarence O.. 420 North Main, Marion, 965-3131, 965-3131 
Graham, James E,, 4505 Blackburn, Ashland, 324-8169, 324- 

1166 ext. 376 
Greene, Therman R., 5610-B Gilkey Loop, Ft. Knox, 4-7960, 

4-6950 
Greenoe, Richard H., 14 Clore Ct.. Henderson, 826-9743, 827-3556 
Grieco, Joe, 2703 Shaffer Ave., Cincinnati. Ohio, 661-3346 
Griffith, Lauren, 7408 Cross Creek Blvd., Louisville, 239-9707, 

459-5970 
Griggs. John M., 3045 Dartmouth Dlive, Lexington, 278-2422, 

23", 0143 
Guess, James E., 949 McCIure Ave., Henderson. 826-2116. 

521-6601 
Hadden. Newell P.. Jr., 942 Wolf Run Rd., Lexington, 255- 

6332, 252-7866 
Hagan, Joe, 3000 Sherbrooke Rd.. Louisville, 458-1325 
Hagerman. Bart, 1912 Ashland Ave.. Ashland, 325-4227. 324- 

1111 ext. 5462 
Hagy. Harold J., 715 Grant St.. Charleston, W. Va. 
Hall. Charles E.. 425 Yale Dr.. Lexington. 278-3995. 299-6212 
Hall. John R.. 2610 Central Pkwy.. Ashland. 326-7306. 324-1111 
Hall. Richard T.. 2960 Rio Rita. Louisville. 458-6611. 586-5893 
Hamilton, Patrick J.. 3316 Radiance Rd., Louisville, 451-9737, 

587-1022 
Harding. Artell. 309 Fonville. Martin. Tenn.. 587-3363 
Hanes. Edward C. 1508 Ridgecrest. Bowling Green. 843-3432 
Ha.-nmock, Don L.. 1512 Audubon Parkway. Louisville, 635- 

7111. 683-5604 
Harris, Gene. 201 Riverside Drive, Russell, 836-8803 
Harris. David L.. 505 North 4th St., Bardstown, 348-6733, 34S- 

3311 
Harris. Jerry, Route No. 1, Cedar Hill, Tenn.. 696-2211 
Harris. Russell. 368 Boiling Springs Drive, Lexington. 254-6525 
Hatfield. Gene Edwin, 103 Henderson Dr. South, Fulton. 472- 

2825. Paducah 443-4600 
Hawkins. WH A.. 407 Grace. Springfield. Tenn., 384-8978, 

384-5583 
Hedge. David Wm.. 321 Mockingbird Dr., Jeffersonville. In- 
diana. 283-3962. 283-3156 



Paee Ten 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR SEPTEMBER, 1966 



Heinold, F. Thomas. 6702 Plantation. Cincinnati. Ohio. 522-7S34 
Heinze, Frank. 204 Maple Ave., Prestonsburg. 886-2436, 377- 

2481 
Heinze. John C... 39 Highland Ave., Prestonsburg, 886-2195. 

874-2110 
Hellai-d. George D.. Jr.. 572 Longview Dr., Lexington, 277- 

2543. 254-0784 
Henichen. Carl. 1941 SchoUenberger Ave., Cincinnati. Ohio. 

931-7997 
Helvev. O. J.. 515 Elm St.. Williamsburg, 6932. 6660 
Hendon. L. J., 228 South 15th St.. Murray, 753-3658 
Hershberger. Richard W., 1203 Lynn Myra Ct.. Louisville, 

367-6820, 367-6820 
Hicks, Lloyd, 6253 Springmeyer Rd., Cincinnati. Ohio. 662- 

5103. 961-7820. e.\t. 216 
Hildebrandt. Glen M.. 368 Bays Ave., Morehead 
Hill. Earl F.. Box 141. London. 864-2521. 864-212S 
Hofstetter. Joe. Box 1815, Williamson. W. Va. 
Holbrook. William H.. No. 1 Roland Park Drive, Huntington, 

W. Va. 
Holbrook. William M.. 2421 Forest Ave.. Ashland. 324-5850, 

324-2144 
Holland. David W.. Box 43. Water Valley, 355-2640. 472-3626 
Hollingsworth. Ralph D.. 206 8th Ave., East, Springfield, 

Tenn.. 384-5467. 384-5700 
Holman. Joseph B.. 2101 St. Teresa Dr.. Lexington, 266-7046, 

282-8328 
Hoiman. S. T.. 207 2nd Street. Corbin. 528-5197. 628-3213 
Huber, Carl W.. 125 North 37th St., Louisville. 774-3387 
Huber. Jerry, 404 Scott St.. Covington, 681-0897. 431-5723 
Hughes. Paul P.. 520 Riverside Drive, Prestonsburg, 886-6771. 

886-2170 
Hurley. Kenneth E.. Valentine Drive, Maysville, 564-5364, 664- 

6216 
Huston, Roderick J.. 7492-C Pressler, Ft. Knox. 4-4487. 4-2942 
Hynson. Fred R., Ill, 2056 St. Christopher, Lexington. 266- 

4285. 264-9895 
Idol. Lloyd, Jr.. 116 Leafwood. Middlesboro. 248-5761 
Idol. Billy Joe. 124 Leafwood Rd.. Middlesboro, 248-2837 
Ingram. William R.. 5466H. Lowe. Ft. Knox. 4-3077. 4-7455 
Ishmael. Stephen A.. 2003 South 2nd St.. Louisville. 637-3822 
Jacoby. Ben W.. 127 Showalter Drive. Geeorgetown. 863-0608. 

252-8328 
James, Gene, 1607 South 3rd St.. Ironton. Ohio, 632-6976, 532- 

6224 
Jarrell. Frank W.. Box 46. Ceredo. W. Va. 

Jenkins. Beryl. 2326 South 11th St.. Ironton. Ohio. 532-6216 
Jenkins. Kean, Box 32, Elizabethtown. 765-4887. 765-4606 
Johns. Joseph O.. U. S. No. 35, Buffalo, W. Va. 
Johnson. Gordon M., 1011 Garred St., Pikeville, GE 7-4758. 

GE 7-6126 
Johnson, Harry A., Jr.. 348 Friedman Ave.. Padueah, 443- 

1767, 444-6311 ext. 402 
Johnson. Robert L., 6 Jamestown Place. Clarksville, Tenn., 

647-3982, 798-5493 
Johnson, Stan W.. 2115 Ottawa Drive. Gwensboro, 684-2157, 

683-2401 ext. 236 
Jones. J. Carl. 1904 Goodwin. Corbin. 528-2349, 528-2450 
Jones. John H.. Route No. 5, Seottsville. 237-3969, 586-5141 
Jones, Paul. 314 Park Lane, Elizabethtown. 766-4502, Ft. 

Knox 7019 
Jones. William A.. 252 North 38th St.. Padueah. 443-7464. 444- 

9691 
Josephs. Michael. 2838 Washington Blvd.. Huntington, W. Va. 
Julian. James R.. 119 Catherine Drive. Hurricane. W. Va. 
Junker. Edwin G.. 1045 W. Seymour, Cincinnati, Ohio. 821-4117 
Kallaher. Jim. 833 Hosier Drive, New Castle, Indiana, 529- 

3189. 629-4790 ext. 34 
Karr. Don, 1503 Woodwind Ct.. Corbin, 528-6466, 528-6466 
Kasperski. Harry W.. 2652-B Fincastle Rd., Louisville. 451- 

1065, 582-5215 
Kathman. Bernie. 3060 Elmwood Drive, South Ft. Mitchell. 

341-7369. 621-7541 
Kaufman. Alvin R., 8215 St. Anthony Church Rd.. Louisville, 

366-0126. 587-0871 
Kauffman. Victor C. 3635 W. 8th Street, Cincinnati. Ohio. 

921-9230. 921-3744 
Kelly. William G., 421-A "A" Street, Fort Knox, 4-7887, 4-1967 
Kemper, Russ. 5732 Lauderdale, Cincinnati Ohio. 931-6222, 

621-4380 
Kerr. Kenneth. 10806 Grafton Hall, Valley Station, 937-3008, 

586-4000 
Kimble. Frank. Box 2173. Williamson. W. Va. 
King. Allen V.. 216 N. Main, Henderson, 826-9647. 826-3321 
Kirk. Floyd Charles. Main St.. Box 334. Benham. 848-2039 
Kraesig. Charles F.. Marengo. Ind.. 633-4842, 633-4273 
Kraft, H. Nellis. 2606 Delor Ave.. Louisville. 637-8195 
Kratzenberg. Ralph. 2412 South 10th St.. Ironton. Ohio. JE 

2-5741. JE 2-5741 
Lally, James J.. 1210 Ross. Cincinnati. Ohio. 471-3644 
Lambert. Irvin. 5110 Rural Way, Louisville, 969-4718, GL 8- 

1948 
Landers. John F., 32 Charlemagne, Clarksville, Tenn., 647- 

2656. 647-6322 
Lange. William E., Jr.. 323 Cecil Ave., Louisville. 774-2974, 

368-2581 
Lawson. Leland. 949 Deporres. Lexington. 254-1009 
Leahy. Pat. 1819 Ratcliffe. Louisville, 776-6368. 687-1121 

ext. 472 



Ledbetter. Paul M.. 5760-A Allison, Ft. Knox, 4-6765, 4-6544 
Lehkamp, Kenneth H., 184 Valley View, Southgate, 441-1475, 

694-6858 
Lenahan. Thomas F., 4309 Retreat Rd., Louisville, 964-4636, 

582-8696 
Leonard, Dale C. 2308 Hikes Lane, Louisville, 451-2308, 634- 

1581 ext. 457 
Liber. James, 7826 Pine Meadow, Cincinnati, Ohio, 931-9577, 

241-6275 
Lindon, Bobby Glenn, 2208 Jasmine, Lexington, 278-2439, 

Frankfort 564-3070 
Lingo. Henry E.. 424 West Main. Vine Grove, 877-2346, 877-6537 
Locke, WiUiam F., P. O. Box 232. Bardstown, 348-5403 
Logan, Eli. 421 Poplar. Hazard, 436-2610. 436-2161 
Long, James E., P. O. Box 73. Baskett. VA 7-5000. JE 3-6421 
Lopp, Wilbur. Jr.. 1906 Hoke Rd.. Louisville, AN 7-5010. 584- 

2155 
Lotz, Robert W.. 106 Buttercup Rd.. Louisville, 239-3976, 634- 

9491 
Lowe, Gene, Box 28, Route No. 6, London, 864-5724, 864-2207 
Lowe, Stan. Box 337. Russellville, 726-6647, Nashville. Tenn., 

CY 7-6521 
Lurker, Mel. 1651 Olive, Evansville, Ind.. 425-3929, 423-5876 
Lusby, George. 615 Pueblo Trail. Georgetown, 863-1440, 863- 

1770 
McCarthy, William J., Dogwood Lane, Fulton, 472-2823, 479- 

2663 
McConachie, Bud. 5608 Halstead Ave., Louisville, 969-9676 
McCormick. Donald R.. Route No. 2. Vicki Way, Frankfort, 

223-5897. 564-4750 
McCowan. Connell, Route No. 1 Box 261, Corbin. 528-4932 
McDougal. Alf. 406 North High St., Franklin, JU 6-4451 (Bus.) 
McFadden, Jimmie. 649 Northside Drive, Lexington, 299-1635, 

277-3977 
McGehee. Gordon. 733 Forest Lane. Covington, 261-6880 
McGlasson, Eugene M., 1800 Brentmoor Ln., Route 5, An- 
chorage. 425-4654 
McGuire. Jack, 6421 Six Mile Lane. Louisville. 459-4031, 246- 

4161 
McKenzie. Robert L., 1809 Chestnut St., Kenova, W. Va. 
McKinney. Adelle F.. 7829-B Estrada Ave.. Ft. Knox, 4-6860, 

4-4558 
McLane, Albert, Route No. 1. Glendale, 862-4579, 862-3924 
McMillen, James N., 305 Riverside Drive, Russell, 836-8064, 324- 

6191 
McNabb. Edgar, 16 Beechwood, So. Ft. Mitchell 
McNamee. Jack. 3616 Muddy Creek. Cincinnati, Ohio, 922-5207 
McPeek, Talmadge, 4800 Williams, Ashland, 324-9775, 324-1191 

ext. 37 
McSheffrey. J. E., 9057 H Young St., Fort Knox. 4-4396, 4-6932 
Madon. Robert L.. 314 Catalpa. Pineville, 337-2135, 337-3093 
Magruder. Earl, 4100 Pixley Way. Louisville, 96S-7046 
Malone. James F.. 200 Padgett. Corbin, 628-2424, 628-9019 
Marcum. Bruce. 1656^'- Sixth Ave., Huntington, W. Va. 
Matthews. Billy D.. 506 Boren, Springfield. Tenn.. 384-6650, 

384-3661 
Mattingly. Charles. 3813 Poplar Level. Louisville, 459-5793 
May. Charles E., Box 185, Prestonsburg, 886-3414, 886-8661 
May. E. B.. Jr.. Box 185. Prestonsburg. 886-3414, 886-8661 
Mayhew. William M.. Pawnee Drive, Elizabethtown, 766-2706, 

Ft. Knox 4-7247 
Maynard. Dr. Joe E.. 809 Nesbitt Drive, Madison, Tenessee, 

865-2438 
Mays, Raymond K., 104 Samuel Ave.. Barboursville. W. Va. 
Meeks. Jack. Tanglewood Drive, Corbin, 528-6404, 628-1836 
Melmige. James. Jr.. Box 2117. Williamson, W. Va. 
Mercke. Frank R.. 417 Lotis Way. Louisville, 896-8460, 634-9491 
Mercker. George E.. 803 Republic Bldg., Louisville. 451-8399, 

582-1645 
Metcalf. Ken. Cub Run. 524-2524, 624-2794 
Metzger, Donald R., 9312 Cloverwood Lane, Fern Creek, 239- 

9813, 454-7511 ext. 4624 
Meyer. Bud. 5319 Lilibet & Court, Cincinnati, Ohio, 922-3469, 

381-4300 
Mickey, Elbert W.. Box 2471. Williamson. W. Va. 
Miller. Everett J., 4108 Riverview. Middletown, Ohio, 423-9978, 

425-3276 
Miller. Maurice Tony. 417 Elm St.. South Charleston, W. Va. 
Millerhaus, Bill, 530 Woodlawn, Cincinnati, Ohio, 471-8467, 

921-9722 
Minta. John H., 326 W. Carter, Clarksville, Ind., BU 3-8553, 

682-3571 extl 386 
Mitchell, Vyron W.. Dogwood Lane. Fulton 
Modrell, Garry W.. 162 Woodland. Lexington, 233-1682. 252- 

2200 ext. 2701 
Moody, William R.. 2032 Oleander Drive, Lexington, 277- 

9622. 252-0420 
Mooneyhan. James H.. 810 Henry St., Franklin, 586-4989, 586- 

4451 
Moore, James Patrick, Jr., 1734 Gettysburg Rd., Lexington, 

278-3960. 262-2250 ext. 3496 
Moore. Jerry W.. 318— 22nd St.. S. E., Charleston. W. Va. 
Mordica. William S.. 800 Edgewood Ave., Ashland. 324-7741 
Morris, Gene L.. 302 Wilson Court. Huntington, W. Va. 
Morgan. Jimmie Lee, 1934 Virginia Avenue West, Hunting- 
ton, W. Va. 
Morgan, Richard, Route No. 6, Box 64, London, 864-6611, 864- 

6114 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR SEPTEMBER, 1966 



Paae Eleven 



Morrissey. Rockne, 4824 Harlou Drive. Dayton, Ohio, 254-4395, 

271-0343 
Morse, Richard K., 163 N. Deepwood Dr., Radcliff. 351-3748, 

Ft. Kno.x 4-4454 
Moss, Howard A., P. O. Box 1042, Paducah. 898-3168, 442-4474 
Moser, To.-ti, Box 191. Stanford, 366-2696, 277-7141 
Mueller. Dick, 2059 Oleander, Lexington, 277-5924. 254-1360 
Mullins. B. E.. Box A, Paintsville, 789-4610, 789-3580 
Mullins. Robert M., 120 Colonial Drive, Louisville. 895-5882 
Muntan. Peter J., 125 Woodmore Ave., Louisville, 368-8236, 

637-7621 ext. 288 
Murray, Thomas, 25 Ashton Rd., So. Ft. Mitchell. 331-1891, 

421-5043 
Napier. Wallace R.. Jr., Mary Alice, 573-3721 
Nassida, Frank R., 108 Buckwood Drive, Richmond, 623-9209, 

623-9858 
Neal, Gene, 3648 SR 132, Route No. 1, Batavia. Ohio. 753-5908. 

242-5151 
Nevil, Vernon E., 7748-C. 70th Tk Bn Road, Ft. Knox, 4- 

5604, 4-8630 
Nickell, Duane "Red". 2009 Broad, Paducah, 444-6096, Jopta 

543-7434 
Niday, Paul D., 4094 Fifth St. Rd., Huntington, W. Va. 
Noland, Douglas, 305 Herndon. Stanford. 365-2609, 365-2619 
Nord, Bertrand J., 4205 Naomi Drive, Louisville, 969-3369, 

687-7571 
Nord, Ed, 7006 Green Manor Drive. Louisville, 239-9160. 896- 

3401 ext. 202 
Nord. Gilbert. 6315 Krause Ave.. Louisville, 447-3133, 687-7571 
Norwood, Thomas R.. 811 Henry St., Franklin, 586-3614, 686- 

3541 
Odil. Wm. Randall. Route 6. Bowling Green, 843-3633, 842-9471 
Oldham. Ben Richard. 516 Estill Court. Georgetown. 863-1208 
Omdahl. John LeRoy, 1556 Alexandria Dr. No. 2A, Lexing- 
ton, 278-2646, 255-6860 ext. 2207 
Omer, Billy W., 250 Reed. Madisonville. 821-2833 
Omer. Harold G., 160 N. Crestmoor. Louisville, 896-4170. 

774-6386 
Orem. Dale Linton, 409 Chippewa Drive, Jeffersonville, Ind., 

BU 3-8225, Louisville 587-1161 ext. 441 
Osborne, Ted G., Box 806, Lexington, 266-6152, 266-6152 
Osmer, Thomas Mitchell. 5442-F Brett Drive, Ft. Knox, 4-6677, 

4-6811 
O'Nan. Norman, Route 4, Henderson, 7-3968, 6-9578 
O'Neal, Bud. 3628 Kelly Way. Louisville, 458-7940 
Osting, James Edward, 502 Meadowbrook, Louisville, EM 8- 

9631. 584-3211, ext. 368 
Owens, Charles C. Jr., 2666 Chesterfield Ave., Huntington, 

W. Va. 
Owens, R. L.. Jr.. 602 18th St.. Corbin, 528-4426. 528-2330 
Pace. Donald. 2023 Deauville, Lexington. 262-6535. 255-0398 
Parker, Bob L.. 8602 Honer Ave., Louisville, 969-9090, 587- 

1121 ext. 225 
Parker, Francis V., 208 Rosemont, Providence. 667-2224 
Parsley, Clyde E.. Route No. 2, Providence, 667-2524, 821-9004 
Pate, Lloyd W., 608 Ronnie Road. Madison. 895-3522, 896-5472 
Paulk, John R., 1711 College Farm Road. Murray. 753-3078, 

924-5602 
Peecher, W. Lloyd, 5928 Woodland, Sciotoville, Ohio, 776-9075 
Peeno. Harry R., 124 Morris Road, Lookout Heights. Cov- 
ington. ED 1-1981 
Pegausch. William E., 618 Brookhaven, Mayfield, 247-5932, 247- 

2267 
Pelham. Pete, 214 Oak St., Dyersburg. Tenn., 285-6649, 285-2323 
Perry. Tom. Route No. 2. Box 494. Mt. Sterling, 498-3827. 

498-3800 
Phipps. James M., 1333 South 3rd St., Louisville. 635-6559, 

BU 3-3561 
Pietrowski, Paul. 108 Bishop St., Corbin, 528-6391 
Plate, Arthur C, 6505 Crestview, Cincinnati, Ohio, 631-6161, 

241-4114 
Porco Kenneth J., 3924 Layside Drive, Louisville. 459-3456. 

458-3281 
Porter. Charles E., 4306 Hawthorne Drive. Owensboro. 684- 

4455, 4-6211 
Powell. Logan G., 107 N. Broadwav Park, Lexington, 252-9615, 

278-5421 ext. 224 
Prather, Wilbur E.. 1512 Berry Blvd., Louisville. 363-2908, 

585-2169 
Prichard, Larry G., West Hamlin. W. Va. 

Bague. Ronald, 5300 Ronwood, Louisville, 964-2350. 637-9171 
Ransbottom, Jack, 2126 Charles, Portsmouth, Ohio, EL 3-0446, 

EL 3-4101 
Rapp, Lowell D.. 1416 S. 4th. Ironton. Ohio, 632-9575 
Rapp, William C. 1836 Woodland Dr., Ironton, Ohio, 532-1983. 

532-7245 
Rawls. L. Townes. 1832 Darien Drive. Lexington. 278-4966. 

254-6498 
Ray, Bob. 407 Leyton Ave.. Louisville, 895-3654. 895-3654 
Ray, Collis Randle, 671 Jameswood Dr., Paducah, 442-2146 
Ray, Shirley G., 4902 Sturbridge Place, Owensboro, 684-8963, 

684-0104 
Reddington. Jim. 3824 Glenside Place, Louisville. 452-9689 
Reece, Fred. 149 Elm St.. Versailles 
Reece, Jerry T., 396 Linden Walk, Lexington, 254-7876, 256- 

6666, ext. No. 6 Station 
Reed, Gordon, 22 Riverside Parkway, Ft. Thomas, 441-4946, 

Cincinnati, Ohio 631-5750 
Eccd .John R.. Knapp Ave.. Morehead. 473-6549 



Reed, Nick, 6320 Hunters Grove Rd., Louisville, 447-8148 

584-0181 
Renfro, John, Box 298, Williamsburg, 6488, 6808 
Richardson, Dennis C, Jr., 1122 Savannah Dr., New Albany, 

Indiana, WA 5-9467 
Rieman. Robert S. 2004 Dallas Ave., Cincinnati. Ohio, 522- 

3694, 522-3694 
Riggs. C. Dennis, 7162 Southside Dr., Louisville, 368-2383, 

636-3571 
Riggins, Jason M.. Box 417, Mann, W. Va. 
Riggs, William To.-n, 103 W. McElroy, Morganfield, 389-2210, 

389-2210 
King, Bill, 481 Rookwood Parkway. Lexington, 299-7089. 254- 

1776 
Robinson. Don L., 2012 Poplar St., Kenova, W. Va. 
Robinson, J. Ward. II, 3802 Nanz Ave. No. 7, Louisville. 

896-0631, 896-0631 
Rodgers, Tom H.. 721 Park Court, Madisonville. 821-7312, 338- 

3800 
Rogers, J. B.. 832 12th Ave.. Huntington, W. Va. 
Rolph, Harold J., 916 South 7th St., Ironton, Ohio, 532-4036, 

532-3231 
Roof. Jerry C, 447 University. Louisville, 986-9067. 896-9057 
Rudolph, Fred, Jr., 5600 Jeanine Drive, Louisville, 969-3013, 

635-7441 
Russell. Gary E., 2112 Gregory Drive. Henderson. 827-1491 
Russell. Joe. Box 213. Russellville, 726-6983. 726-6983 
Russman. Godfrey F.. 1041 Goss Ave.. Louisville, 636-7426 

(Bus.) 
Sacra, Gresham, 605 Anniston Dr., Lexington, 299-8170, 299- 

1221, ext. 2244 
Sagers, Robert M., 494 Morrvue Dr., Cincinnati, Ohio, 921- 

0724. 251-4510 
Sallee. Alan Lee. 3236 North Talbot Road, Erlanger. 341-3656. 

PL 1-2808 
Sanders. Mel, 3910 Sunset, Paducah, 442-3650 
Sapp, Edward, 2806 Dell Brooke, Louisville, 468-8989. 454- 

7511 ext. 4779 
Sawyer. Thomas G. Route No. 1, Shawnee Estates, Winfield, 

W. Va. 
Schad, Jim, 10717 Chelmsford Road. Forest Park, Ohio. 825- 

3343. 931-1260 
Schiering. Jack H.. 6948 Terrylynn Lane. Cincinnati, Ohio, 

681-2272 
Schlich. Paul. 3316 Dean Drive. Louisville. 458-6765. 896-0211 
Schlosser, J. Paul, 1971 N. Lynndale Ave., Cincinnati, Ohio, 

521-6162, 621-6162 
Schmitt. K. F., 710 E. Walnut, Louisville. 772-0131. 684-8269 
Schmitt, Paul E., 3864 Darlene Drive, Louisville, 778-6365. 

635-5251 
Schrecker, Dennis R., 4312 Lowe Rd., Louisville, 461-1435. 

451-1435 
Schuble, Charles E., 2362 Ashwood, Louisville, 459-1774, 636-1431 
Schwetschenau, Paul, 7013 Clovernoll Dr., Cincinnati, Ohio. 

931-3648, 243-3882 
Sconce. John, 162 East Main, Lynch, 848-2250 
Scott. W. L., 1816 McDonald, Lexington, 278-2844, 254-1818 
Seale. Frank E., lOOl Tates Creek Rd.. Lexington, 266-8646 
Seavers, Joseph E., 2517 Ann St., Ludlow, 341-0213. 291-8926 
Shanks, Thomas E., 3113 Vogue Ave., Louisville. 464-4203, 

458-5502 
Shaw. Earl. 121 Hagan Court, Lancaster, 792-2370. 648-2208 
Shaw, John H., 219 East Lee, Mayfield 247-1907 
Shewmaker, Wayne, 206 W. Meadow Dr., Clarksville, Tenn., 

647-7351. 647-1720 
Simms, Clarence E., 610 Linden Ave.. Newport. 261-0736 
Shirley. Michael D.. Jr.. 9818 Caven Ave.. Louisville, 969-8801 
Showalter. John, Georgetown, 863-1892 
Sligh. James E., 607 Sherwood Rd., Cynthiana, 234-4346. 724- 

2301 
Sloan. Wallace. 419 Oread Rd.. Louisville. 895-1126. 583-0621 
Slone. Earl Dean. Route No. 1, Box lOD, Corbin, 528-4197, 

628-9038 
Smith, Robert Eugene, 3613 Kings Highway, Louisville, 451- 

6244 
Snyder, Gus, 2420 Adams. Ashland. 324-7927. 324-1111 ext. 6558 
South, Stanley P., 116 Long Ave., Winchester, 744-5753. 744- 

4812 ext. 47 
Spath, William J., 4019 Rosemont Ave., Louisville, 452-9637, 

584-5209 
Speck, Michael E., 206 Sunset Road, Elizabethtown, 765-6385 

862-1924 
Speaks, Carl V.. 118 Main, Stanford, 365-2109. 365-2109 
Staten. Joseph B.. 4303 Wyola Court, Louisville, 458-7454 
Staples, Jerry. 1755 N. Green. Henderson, 826-4882, 826-9085 
Stephens. Herbert D., 133 First St., West. Ceredo. W. Va. 
Stephenson, Harry S.. 1612 Hawthorn, Lexington, 299-1757 256- 

2960. ext. 284 
Stevens. William D.. 1033 Clairborne Way. Lexington. 266-2578 

299-1221 ext. 2223 
Strain. Richard P., Box 472, Radcliff, 361-4306, Ft. Knox 4- 

6757 
Strong, Arnett, 116 Kentucky Blvd., Hazard. 436-3938. 436-2141 
Sullivan. A. G., 1921 Goodwin Ave., Corbin, 628-1282, 628-9035 
Sullivan, Don Chris. 2083 Old Nassau Rd., Lexington, 277-6953 

Frankfort, 664-4806 

Sucietto, Dick, 6572 Gaines Rd. Cincinnati, Ohio, 521-7495, 821- 
4280 ext. 379 



Page Twelve 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR SEPTEMBER, 1966 



SOUTHLAND SPORT SHOP 

348 Southland Dr. Lexington, Ky. 

In Stock For Immediate Delivery by U.P.S. 

J. A. McFadden, School Rep. 

649 Northside Dr. 

Lexington, Ky. 

Phone 299-1635 

All Star Cotton Socks— Sized 10, 11, 12, 13 $ 4.50 doz. 

Riddell White Helmets— (We install bars) $ 18.95 

Riddell Football & Coaches Shoes and Shoulder Pads, RSS & 
Jet Basketballs, Converse Shoes — Call us for quantity prices 

Football Practice Pants $ 4.95 

Trophies in stock at all prices — ^We engrave at our store 
Sweat Shirts — We print our ovi^n at store, 3-4 week service, 

36 minimum $ 1.95 ea. 

Coat Style Sweaters $ 12.95 & $ 13.95 

V-Neck White Sweaters $ 8.25 & up 

6" Chenille Letters— (Plain) 2 weeks $ 1.35 ea. 

J & J Speed Pack Tape $ 17.95 

Cramer Trainers Supplies 

Mouthpieces .95 

SOUTHLAND SPORT SHOP 

Gene Stokley 277-3977 Dick Wallace 



Swarts. Joseph C, 135 Lane. Ironton, Ohio, 532-9349 
Swinford, John, 202 S. Elmarch, Cynthiana, 234-2562, 234-5820 
Tackett, Jay, Stamping Ground, 535-6653 

Talbot, William G., Ill, Route No. 1, Paris.987-2452, 987-2961 
Taylor, Dennis H.. 1406 Hughes. Murray. 753-4825, 753-5022 
Taylor. Ronald L., HQ Special Troops, USAARMC, Fort Knox, 

765-5685. 4-2525 
Tehan. James. 140 15th St.. Newport. 291-1309. 261-0046 
Thomas. Bill. 3418 Burrell Dr., Louisville. 447-7521 
Thomas. Charles. 410 E. Drive. Fulton. 472-3652. 472-1637 
Thomas. Frank M.. 629i/. South 44th St.. Louisville. 774-2624, 

778-9157 
Thomas. Raymond E., 1106 Main St., Sturgis. 333-2151, VA 

7-9891 
Thompson, Jack, 2347 Saratoga Drive, Louisville, 452-9255, 

454-4585 
Thompson. Jack F.. Jr.. 1310 Rammers Ave., Louisville, ME 

4-3517. JU 4-5311 
Thompson, Thomas Droege, 519 Erlanger Rd., Erlanger. 341- 

1809, 331-1651 
Timmering. George E., 228 Roney Drive, Hopkinsville, 886- 

2198. 886-1922 
Thrasher. Phillip. 1105 Westwood, New Albany, Ind.. WH 4- 

3434. WH 4-2216 
Trautwein. Jim. 4313 Martha, Louisville, 458-7438, 454-3449 
Treas. Joe W.. 609 Green St.. Fulton. 472-1604. 472-1836 
Trimer. Norman E.. 1929 Taffeta Drive. Valley Station, 937- 

6672, Ft. Knox 4-8514 
Troutman. Bill. Box 265. Kenvir, 837-2632 
Trunzo. N. P.. 1015 Elaine Dr., Louisville, 969-0559, GL 4- 

7511 ext. 4451 
Turley, Bernard L.. 5503 Ampere Drive, Charleston. W. Va. 
Tussey, George, Jr., Route No. 2. Box lOOB, Catlettsburg, 739- 

4617 
Usery. L. L., Greenfield, Tenn.. 235-3141 

VanHoose. Jack D.. 106 Short. Paintsville, 789-5253. 789-3581 
Vankirk, Alvia S.. 107 South Poplar, Corbin. 628-2338, 528-3131 
VanMeter, David G., 3148 Talisman Rd., Louisville 454-4030 
Van Zant, Jim. Box 602, Williamson, W. Va. 
Varner, Gene, 612 East Pike, Cynthiana, 234-2030, 234-1631 



1966-67 Insurance Subsidy 

As reported in the Board of Control meeting 
minutes which appeared in the May issue of the 
ATHLETE, the Board voted in its April meeting that 
the insurance subsidy of each Kentucky member 
school in 1966-67 shall be the basic amount of $40.00, 
with an additional subsidy of $60.00 for schools maiin- 
taining football. Principals of all K.H.S.A.A. member 
schools have been mailed reimbursement forms. Some 
of the companies with which Kentucky schools place 
their insurance business give the schools credit for the 
amounts due and bill the Association for these a- 
mounts. The reimbursement plan and the credit plan 
are both satisfactory. 



(Continued in October issue) 



For Converse Shoes 

and All FootbaU 

and Basketball Equipment 

TRADE WITH 

the Midland Trail Sport Shop 

13 SOUTH BANK STREET 
MT. STERLING, KENTUCKY 



AS WE BEGIN OUR FOURTEENTH YEAR OF 
PROVIDING STUDENT AND ATHLETIC IN- 
SURANCE COVERAGE AND SERVICE TO 
KENTUCKY SCHOOLS, WE WANT TO EX- 
PRESS OUR THANKS TO YOU, OUR VALUED 
CUSTOMERS, AND WISH YOU A SUCCESS- 
FUL SCHOOL YEAR. WE APPRECIATE 
YOUR CONFIDENCE AND THE FINE JOB 
YOU ARE DOING FOR THE CHILDREN OF 
OUR STATE. KEEP UP THE GOOD WORK! 



7^e Klwfden Gomfiximf, 



GENERAL AGENT 



W. E. KINGSLEY J. E. McCREARY, Mgr. CHARLES C. PRICE 

Life Department 

121-123 LAFAYETTE AVENUE LEXINGTON, KY. PHONE 255-0837 

P. O. BOX 7100 



Title I 



We at Hunt's are prepared to help you lay out a prograrn of equipment 
and apparatus that will meet your needs for your Title I physical edu- 
cation programs. 

We are distributors for the very best manufacturers of physical educa- 
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We feature and can supply merchandise from the following manufac- 
turers : 

Rubber physical education balls by VOIT 

Gymnasium apparatus by GYM MASTER 

Gym mats and apparatus by AALCO 

Indoor play equipment by COSOM 

Outdoor play equipment by STANDARD and GENERAL 

Storage equipment by LYON METAL 

Athletic equipment by BRUNSWICK 

Athletic equipment by SPALDING 

Bats by HILLERICH & BRADSBY 

First Aid supplies by BIKE, CRAMER, and JOHNSON & 
JOHNSON 

Our 50 years of experience in athletic goods business are at your service 
to help lay out a program, show you samples, or work with you in any 
way that may be of help to you. 

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be of value to a complete education program. 

If you would like to see our salesmen for Title I or any athletic activity, 
call us collect in Mayfield at 247-1941. 

HUNT'S ATHLETIC GOODS, Inc. 

CH 7-1941 — PHONES — CH 7-1942 
MAYFIELD, KENTUCKY 

Wp ShipTRp DaV Vou BuV 





HiqhkhoolAthMe 



The Player . . . 

1. He lives clean and plays hard. He plays for the love of the game. 

2. He wins without boasting, he loses without excuses and he never 
quits. 

3. He respects officials and accepts their decisions without question. 

4. He never forgets that he represents his school. 



The Coach ... 

1. He inspires in his boys a love for the game and the desire to win. 

2. He teaches them that it is better to lose fairly than to win unfairly. 

3. He leads players and spectators to respect officials by setting them a 
good example. 

4. He is the type man he wants his boys to be. 

The Official . . . 

1. He knows the rules. 

2. He is fair and firm in all decisions. He calls them as he sees them. 

3. He treats players and coaches courteously and demands the same 
treatment for himself. 

4. He knows the game is for the boys, and lets them have the spotlight. 



The Spectator . . . 



1. He never boos a player or official. 

2. He appreciates a good play, no matter who makes it. 

3. He knows the school gets the blame or the praise for his conduct. 

4. He recognizes the need for more sportsmen and fewer "sports." 



Official Organ of tlie 

KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION 

October, 1966 



K.H.S.A.A. Football Schools 

(Asterisks Indicate 8 man Football Schools'; 

SCHOOL ADDRESS COACH 



Ky. Military Inst. Lyndon 
Ky. School for DeafDanville 
Knox Central Barbourville 



Anderson 
Atherton 
Austin-Trac> 

Bardstown 

Bath Counly 

Beechwood 

Belfry 

Bell County 

Bellevue 

Berea 

Bishop David 

Boone Countj 

Bourbon Couni 

Bowling Geeei. 

Boyd County 

Boyle County 

Breckinridge Cou 

Bryan Station 

Burgin 

Butler 

Butler County 



Lawrenceburg 

Louisville 

Austin 

Bardstown 
Owingsville 
South Fort Mitchell 
Belfry 
Pineville 
Bellevue 
Berea 
Louisville 
Florence 
Paris 

Bowling Green 
Route 2. Ashlanc 
Danville 
nty Harned 
Lexington 
Burgin 
Louisville 
Morgan tow 11 



Caldwell Count? 

Campbell Count., 

Campbellsville 

Carroll County 

Catlettsburg 

Cavei-na* 

Central 

Christian Count; 

Cor bin 

Crittenden Counl^ 

Cumberland 

Cumberland County 

Danville 
Daviess Count> 
Dayton 
De Sales 
Dixie Heights 
du Pont Manual 
Durrett 
Dunbar 

Eastern 
Elizabethtowr: 
Elkhorn City 
Eminence 
Evai-ts 

Fairdale 

Falmouth 

Fern Creek 

Flaget 

Fleming Countj 

Fleming-Neon 

Fort Knox 

Fort Campbell 

Frankfort 

Franklin County 

Franklin-Simpsou. 

Fulton 

Fulton County 



Princeton 

Alexandria 

Campbellsvili' 

CarroUton 

Catlettsburg 

Horse Cave 

Louisville 

Hopkinsvillf^ 

Cox-bin 

Marion 

Cumberland 

Burkesville 

Danville 

Owensboro 

Dayton 

Louisville 

South Ft. Mitchell 

Louisville 

Louisville 

Liexington 

Louisville 
Elizabethtowr. 
Elkhorn City 
Eminence 
Evarts 

Fairdale 

Falmouth 

Fern Creek 

Louisville 

Flemings burg 

Fleming 

Fort Knox 

Fort Campbeli 

Frankfort 

Frankfort 

Franklin 

Fulton 

Hickman 



Gamaliel* Gamaliel 

GaiTard County Lancaster 

Geoi'ge Rogers Clark Winchestei 
Georgetown Georgetowr 

Glasgow Glasgow 

Greensburg Greensburg 



Harlan 


Harlan 


Harrison Count} 


Cynthiana 


Harrodsburg 


Harrodsburg 


Hazard 


Hazard 


Hazel Green 


East Bernstad 


Henderson 


Henderson 


Henderson County 


Henderson 


Henry Clay 


Lexington 


Henry County 


New Castle 


Highlands 


Fort Thomas 


HiseviUe* 


Hiseville 


Holmes 


Covington 


Hopkinsville 


Hopkinsville 


Iroquois 


Louisville 


Irvine 


Irvine 



James A. Cawood Harlan 

Jenkins Jenkins 

Jessamine County Nicholas villc 

Johns Creek Pikeville 



Bobby Kincer 
Jack Kleier 
Roy Petitt 

Garnis Martin 
C. B. Bradshaw Ji. 
Tom Creamer 
Albert Vippermaii 
Timothy Sowdcrs 
Ben Pumphrey 
Larry Marmic 
Denny Nash 
Jack Turner 
Eugene Correll 
John Bariola 
Tom Scott 
Dennis Sexton 
Stan Napper 
Dan Haley 
Gilbert Shely 
Milan Perpicb 
Jim Meyer 

Fred R. Claytoi. 
Bob Miller 
Vince Hancock 
Charles Gibson 
Jack Ison 
Jerome Ramses 
John R. Rhodes 
Vic Waggoner 
Hal Lockhart 
Raymond Heffington 
Needham Saylor 
Ray Coe 

Pat Dale 
Waymond Morrit 
Raymond King 
Tom Ososkie 
Charles Fugitt 
Charles Bentley 
William C. Wyatt 
N. L. Passmore 

John R. Young 
Bill Hogg 
William E. Duty 
Lloyd Block 
Charles Hunter 

Joseph Goodman 
Gordon Lee Staten 
Ed Orick 
Nonnan Mackin 
Joe A. Simons 
Raymond Isaacs 
Paul Jones 
Marshall Patterson 
O. C. Leathers 
Dick Roddy 
Bob Brown 
Frank McCann 
Dale Alexander 

Bob Par due 
Coy Dyehouse 
Don Netoskie 
Jack Massie 
Lawrence Gilbert 
Coy Pigman 

Dan Beasley 
Bill McKee 
Bernard Correll 
Newt Green 
Hughes Bennett 
William Dawson 
Mojo Hollowell 
Andy Hopkins 
Frank Tomaro 
Owen Hauck 
Bobby Driver 
Tom Ellis 
Fleming Thornton 

Dave Fryrear 
William Spicer 

Charlie Davis 
Tom Brush 
Elmer Stephenson 
John O'Brien 



Layfayette 

LaRue County 

Lebanon 

Leslie County 

Lily 

London 

Louisa 

L'ville Country 

Louisville Male 

Lloyd 

Ludlow 

Lynch 

Lynn Cami 



Lexington 
Hodgenville 
Lebanon 
Hvden 
Lily 
London 
Louisa 
Day Louisville 
Louisville 
Erlanger 
Ludlow 
Lynch 
Corbin 



McKell 
Madisonville 
Mayfield 
M. C. Napier 
Madison 

Madison Central 
Meade County 
Mercer 

Metcalfe County 
Middlesboro 
Millersburg Mil. Ins. 
Montgomery County 
Morgan County 
Mt. Sterling 
Mt. Vernon 
Murray 

Newport 

Newport Catholic 
Nicholas County 
North Hardin 
North Warren* 
North Marshall 



South Shore 

Madisonville 

Mayfield 

Hazard 

Richmond 

Richmond 

Brandenburg 

Harrodsburg 

Edmonton 

Middlesboro 

Millersburg 

Mt. Sterling 

West Liberty 

Mt. Sterling 

Mt. Vernon 

Murray 

Newport 
Newport 
Carlisle 
Vine Grove 
Smiths Grove 
Calvert City 



Ohio County Hartford 
Old Kentucky Home Bardstown 

Oldham County LaGrange 

Owen County Owenton 

Owensboro Owensboro 

Owensboro Catholic Owensboro 

Paducah Tilghman Paducah 

Paintsville Paintsville 

Paris Paris 

Park City* Park City 

Paul G. Blazer Ashland 

Pikeville Pikeville 

Pineville Pineville 
Pleasure Ridge Park Louisville 

Prestonsburg Prestonsburg 



Raceland 
Rowan County 
Russell 
Russellville 

St. Joseph 

St. Xavier 

Say re 

Scott County 

Seneca 

Shawnee 

Shelby County 

Shelbyville 

Shepherdsville 

Simon Kenton 

Somerset 

Southern 

Stanford 

Tates Creek 
Temple Hill* 
Thomas Jefferson 
Tompkinsville 
Trigg County 
Trinity 

Union County 



Valley 

Waggener 

Warren County 

Washington County 

Western 

Westport 

Wheelwright 

Whitesburg 

Whitley County 

Will'amsburg 

Woodford County 

Wurtland 



Raceland 
Morehead 
Russell 
Russellville 

Bardstown 

Louisville 

Lexington 

Georgetown 

Louisville 

Lou'sville 

Shelbyville 

Shelbyville 

Shepherdsville 

Independence 

Somerset 

Louisville 

Stanford 

Lexington 

Glasgow 

Louisville 

Tompkinsville 

Cadiz 

Louisville 

Morganfield 
Valley Station 

Louisville 

Bowling Green 

Springfield 

Louisville 

Louisville 

Wheelwright 

Whitesburg 

Williamsburg 

Williamsburg 

Versailles 

Wurtland 



Dudley Berthold 
James Morrison 
Charles D. Black 

Edward Sellier 
Clarence Caple 
Robert Hourigan 
Wendell Adkins 
Roy Cochran 
Lawrence Kuhl 
Bill Haines 
Dudley Hoffman 
Dave Kuhn 
Roy Lucas 
Ronald Johnson 
Ed Miracle 
Robert Igo 

Tom Sims 
Bill Welborn 
Virgil Rains 
Charles Hall 
Jack Hall 
Frank Ray 
Wilson Sears 
David Grim 
Harold Chambers 
Walt Green 
Buck Dawson 
Clayton Taylor 
Bruce Howard 
Charles Ishmael 
Lawrence Travis 
Preston Holland 

Sherrill Morgan 
Bob Schneider 
Richard Jones 
Dan Walker 
Marvin Burgess 
Dave Holt 

Tommy Glover 
Joe K. Jaggers 
Orville Howard 
Guy R. Patterson 
Gerald Poynter 
Tony Lanham 

Ralph Colby 
Walter Brugh 
Jack D. Fugate 
Harold Wood 
John Hallum 
Gene Davis 
William Adams 
Bob Williams 
Bert Dixon 

Charles Sammons 
Paul Ousley 
Heulyn Bishop 
Clarence Baker 

Fred Francis 
John Meihaus 
Dan H. Hill 
Bill Wilson 
Ron Cain 
Lee Murray 
Gene Foster 
Richard Greenwell 
Nick Diachenko 
James Jenkins 
Jarrell Johns 
George Bertram 
William Ed Leedy 

William Straub 
Jim Lindsey 
James Gray 
Frank Petett 
Robert Bowling 
James Kennedy 

Roy Hina 
Dallas Arnold 

John Stoll 
Estill J. Branham 
Charles Kolasa 
Bob Cleveland 
Earl E. Browning 
Harry Haywood 
Walter Thomas 
Perky Bryant 
Melvin Chandler 
John Snowden 
Bobby Lucas 



7^26 Kentucky High School Athlete 

Official Organ of the 
Kentucky High School Athletic Association 



VOL. XXIX— No. 3 



OCTOBER, 1966 



$1.00 Per Year 



Early Season Football Questions 



EDITOR'S NOTE: These interpretations of the 1966 
National Alliance Football rules do not set aside nor 
modify any rule. They are made and published by the 
National Federation of State High School Athletic As- 
sociations in response to situations presented. 

1. Play: A ball having laces on two or more sides is 
given to the referee for use in a game. 

Ruling: Illegal ball-i-ule specifies "the lace," which 
is singular. Therefore, a ball may legally have only 
one lace. 

2. Play: Free-kick strikes the ground beyond R's 
free-liick line and: (a) Rl recovers the ball and is 
tackled immediately; or (b) K secures possession; or 
(c) after the ball has come to rest neither team re- 
covers it and it is, therefore, declared dead. 

Ruling: The covering official will use his whistle 
to signal the ball is dead in each situation. The clock 
will not be started until the ball has been placed, de- 
clared and signaled ready-for-play. In (a) and (c) it 
will be 1st and 10 for R, and in (b) it will be 1st and 
10 for K. 

3. Play: Free-kick is muffed in flight by Rl and 
rebounds: (a) behind K's free-kick line Where K2 re- 
covers; or (b) into K's end zone where K2 and R2 
are in joint possession when ball becomes dead; or 
(c) rebounds into K's end zone where ball is blown 
dead because all players refuse to touch it. 

Ruling: In (a), ball belongs to K. Bali may not be 
advanced even though a recovered scrimmage-kick in a 
similar situation might be advanced. In (b), R is con- 
sidered to be in possession, hence it is a touchdown. 
In (c), the loose ball is stUI in K's possession when it 
becomes dead and it is a safety, since K provided the 
force. 

4. Play: A substitute entering the game, or a 
participant, is discovered to be weEiring a sole leather 
guard on his upper arm, that is, between tlie elbow 
and shoulder. This pad is not a part of the shoulder 
pad. It: (a) is without covering; or (b) has a soft 
padding. 

Ruling: Illegal equipment in both (a) and (b). A 
guard worn between the elbow and shoulder must be 
made of soft substance. 

3. Play: Is a team statistician permitted to move 
along the sidelines out-of-bounds to follow the progress 
of the game? 

Ruling: Yes, assuming that the person is a bona 
fide statistician. A person serving in this capacity 
must not coach, direct nor encourage any player or 
players, and neither may he question, criticize nor 
attempt to influence a decision by an official. Neither 
may he communicate with the personnel of the team 
box. He must conduct himself as would a neutral per- 
son during the time he is serving in this capacity. It 
is recommended that a statistician be an adult and 
preferably not a member of the coaching staff. 

6. Play: Substitute or player Al is wearing a 
bandage taped on his hand or has his hand taped or a 
bsindage on his foreami or his forearm taped more 



than 3" above the wrist toward the elbow. 

Ruling: All tape or bandage on a hand or forearm 
is illegal, unless sanctioned by the umpire as being 
non-abrasive and necessary to protect an existing in- 
jury, excepting that taping the wrist from the base of 
the thumb and no more than 3" tov,'ard the elbow is 
permitted. The umpire will sanction hand or forearm 
bandages or taping only in case it is necessary to pro- 
tect an existing injury. This season's coverage (1966) 
is identical with that of last year's. 

7. Play: Al jumps to catch a forward pass and 
alights on a sideline. 

Ruling: Incomplete pass. Ball taken to previous 
spot. 

8. Play: After advancing 5 yards, Al fiunbles the 
ball on B's 2-yardUne and it rolls into B's end zone. 
B2 bats the ball over the end line. 

Ruling: If A accepts the penalty, they will next 
put the ball in play on B's 1 yardhne, the penalty be- 
ing one-half the distance to the goal measured from 
the spot where the run by Al ended (2-yardline) . If 
the penalty is declined, it is a touehback. 

9. Play: The snapper, after gripping and adjust- 
ing the ball to a legal position with both hands, slowly 
removes one hand in preparation to making the snap 
with one hand. In taking his hand from the ball, the 
action does not in any v/ay simulate a snap. 

Ruling: Legal. 

10. Play: Team B is granted a charged time-out. 
As the time-out period ends, Al learns his helmet is in 
need of repair. Assuming the repair or replacement of 
the hehnet will take more than 25 seconds, may team 
.A be granted a charged time-out? 

Ruling: No. A charged time-out may not immedi- 
ately follow another charged time-out. 

11. Play: 18 minutes have expired between the 
2nd and 3rd quarter (half-time) before team B leaves 
the dressing room to return to the playing field. 

Ruling: The 3rd quarter may not start until both 
teams have had a full 3 minutes of wai-m-up. The 
3-minute period may not be set aside. Play may not 
be resiuned until both teams have fulfilled the r^e- 
quirement of a 3-minute warm-up. Team B is penal- 
ized 15 yards on the kick-off for unsportsmanlike con- 
duct, that is, for its failure to be ready to start the 
3rd quarter on time. 

12. Play: Is the signal prompter (or as it is fre- 
quently uncomplimentarily referred to, the idiot's card 
holder) which is worn on the wrist or forearm, legal 
equipment? 

Ruling: The most common models are illegal on 
two counts. Most often they are made of plastic and 
are, therefore, Ulegal. Any such device is illegal when 
it is used to cEirry written instructions into the game. 

13. Play: Ineligible A8 catches, bats of muffs a 
forward pass: (a) while he is illegally beyond the neu- 
tral zone; or (b) while he is in or behind the neutral 
zone. 

(Continued on Page Seven) 



Page Two 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR OCTOBER, 1966 



OCTOBER. 1966 



VOL. XXIX— 3 



Published monthly, except June and July, by the Kentucky 

Higrh School Athletic Association 

Office of Publication, Lexington, Ey. 40511 

Second class postage paid at Lexington, Kentucky. 

Editor THEO. A. SANFORD 

Assistant Editor J. B. MANSFIELD 

Lexington, Ey. 
BOARD OF CONTROL 

President Sherman Gish (1963-67). Greenville 

Vice-President Don Davis (1963-67), Independence 

Directors — Morton Combs (1964-68), Carr Creek: Ralph C. 
Dorsey (1966-70), Horse Cave; Preston Holland (1963-69), 
Murray: Don R. Rawlings (1965-69), Danville: Foster J. 
Sanders (1966-70), Louisville: Oran C. Tcater (1964-68). 
Paintsville. 

Subscription Rate $1.00 Per Year 

J>iom the Commlssione>i s CJffice 

Employment Bureaus 

Sixteen employment bureaus for officials have 
been established. Each registere(3 officdal should file at 
once with his nearest bureau head his schedule of 
games and list of dates on which the official will be 
available to call games. The names of the bureau 
heads, with the residence and business phone numbers 
(residence numbers given first), are as follows: 

Rex Alexander, 1320 Wells Blvd.. Murray, 763- 
3579, 762-3575 

Charhe Irwin, Route 4, Hopkinsville, 8864820, 886- 
4820 

Jerry Kimmel, Beechmont, 476-2656, 476-2656 

Bob Gour, 218 S. Lee St., Bowling Green, 843-9582, 
745-4293 

Howard Gardner, 829 McCollum Ave., Elizabeth- 
town, 765-6273, 543-2494 

Qaude Ricketts, 1506 Larchmont Ave., Louisville, 
635-6536, 634-1551, ext. 220 

Hubert Louden, 4815 Red Start Rd., Louisville, 
964-2639, 584-4141 

Roy Winchester, Bethlehem, 8784102 (Pleasure- 
ville), 346-8421 (New Castle) 

Jack Wise, 209 Pocahontas, Georgetown, 863-3948, 
863-1393 

Bob Miller, 197 Holiday Lane, Ft. Thomas, 441- 
5S85, 694-6858 

Bin Wise, 240 St. Ann, Lexmgton, 266-7449, 252-5492 

Bob Foster, Science HUl, 423-8683, 678-8161 

Walt Green, 411 North 25th St., Middlesboro, 248- 
4569, 248-1000 

Kenneth Loudy, Slemp, 675-4278, 675-4278 

E. B. May, Jr., P. O. Box 85, Prestonsburg, 886- 
3414, 886-8661 

Ernie ChatUn, Y.M.C.A., Ashland, 324-2665, 324-6191 



Certified Football Officials 



Beck, C. Norman 
Bell, Clarence T. 
Blanton, Homer 
Bond, Jack D. 
Bordy, Philip 
Boyles, Jerry F. 



Brotzge, Maurice 
Brown, Bill 
Brizendine, Vic 
Burton, John 
Canter, John 
Craft, Albert B. 



Craft, Bill 
CuUen, Charles E. 
Gulp, Willard E. 
Current, Ray 
Dalhnann, James W. 
Davis, Clyde E. 
Davis, W. (Turtis 
Denton, Charles 
Durkin. Jack H. 
Elovitz, Carl 
Faust, Jack 
Florence, Robert H. 
Forbes, J. W. "Jack" 
Fortney, Robert L. 
Foster, J. W. 
FraJey, Bill 
Franklin, James A. 
Frazer, Tom Roe 
Gour, Bob 
Grace, (Charles K. 
Grace, H. E., Jr. 
Graham, James 
Hadden, Newall 
Hagan, Joseph E. 
Hagerman, Bart 
Hanes, Ed 
Hedge, David Wm. 
Heinze, Frank 
Heinze, John G. 
Hellar(l, George D. 
Huber, Carl W. 
Jenkins, Kean 
Kraesig, Charles F. 
Lambert, Irvin 
Lange, William E., Jr. 
Lenahan, Thomas F. 
Lotz, Robert W. 
McGehee, Gordon 
McGlasson, Gene 
McLemore, Jack T. 
McNabb, Edgar 
May, E. B., Jr. 
Mayhew, Wm. M. 
Mayo, Henry L. 



Mercke, Frank R. 
Minta, John H. 
Mordica. William A. 
MuUins, B. E. 
Murray, Thomas 
Neal, Gene 
Noland, Doug 
Nord, Ed 
Omer, Harold G. 
Osborne, Ted 
Peeno, Harry R. 
Powell, Logan 
Reddington, Jim 
Reece, Fred "Rock" 
Riggs, William T. 
Sacra, Gresham 
Sapp, Edward 
SchUoh, Paul 
Schmitt, K. F. 
Scjhmitt, Paul E. 
Scott, W. L. "BUI" 
Scale, WilUam E. 
Shanks, Thomas E. 
Shaw, John H. 
Showalter, John 
Sloan, Wallace 
Snyder, Gus 
Staten, Joe 
Stephenson, Harry 
Stevens, WilUam D. 
Sullivan, Don C. 
Swinfor(i, John 
Thompson, Jack F., Jr. 
VanMeter, David G. 
Walker, Paul R. 
Wanchic, Nick 
Washer, Stanley 
Watts, Shirley R. 
Welch, J. D. 
Wilson, Louis 
Wise, BiUy V. 
Wise, Jack 
Womack, WilUam H. 
Zimmer, Tom 



Approved Football Officials 



Adams, Calvin K. 
Albright, James R. 
Bivins, George W. 
Brown, Herman 
Brown, John W. "Scoop" 
Canady, Ray B. 
Clark, Charles L. 
Collins, C. E. "Jack" 
Cowan, Robert L. 
Dent, Donald L. 
Fenimore, Clarke E. 
Fish, Leland G. 
Flynn, Bobby 
Frankel, Louis S. 
Fryrear, WiUiam P. 
Galuk, Walter M. 
Gentry, Dale J. 
Garrett, Richard A. 
Hall, Richard 
Kaufman, Alvin R. 
Kraft, H. NeUis 
Leahy, Pat 
Leonard, Dale C. 
Lusby, George H. 
McConachie, Bud 



McNamee, Jack E. 
Mattingly, (diaries "Pete" 
Maynard, Joe E. 
Mercker, George E. 
Metzger, Donald R. 
Moody, WiUiam R. 
Morse, Richard K. 
Nord, Bertrand J. 
Nord, Gilbert 
Oldliam, Ben 
Parsley, Clyde E. 
Prather, WUbur (BiU) E. 
Raque, Ron 
Ray, Bob 
Ring, BUI 
RusseU, Gary E. 
Schuble, Charles E. 
Strain, Richard P. 
Trunzo, Nick 
Wagner, Jim 
WaUer, Bob 
Warren, Kenneth A. 
Washaleski, Thomas V. 
White, James (Pete) 
Wray, Robert F. 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR OCTOBER, 1966 



Page Three 



SUPPLEMENTARY LIST OF 

REGISTERED FOOTBALL OFFICIALS 

(Lis} Compiled October 1) 

If the telephone number is given for an official listed. 
it is the home phone number unless otherwise designated. If 
two numbers are given, the first number is that of the home 
phone. 

Barnett, Willis E., 2208 W. Chestnut, Louisville, 778-7626, 

778-2721 
Bates, Bob, 2732 Sunrise, Portsmouth, Ohio. 354-2168, 354-2168 
Bauwens, Joe A., Box 1108, Newgarden Station, Ft. Knox, 

942-2204, 4-3035 
Bolte, Fritz, 1059 Roxie Lane, Cincinnati, Ohio, 521-0472, 

891-4214 
Bond, Jack C, 775 Cindy Blair Way, Lexington, 277-2351, 

252-2250 ext. 3215 
Bostic, Tim, 208 Bridge St., Paintsville, 789-3366, 789-5315 
Bradley, Delano R., P. O. Box 112, Goshen, Ohio, 625-7741, 

271-0422 
Brown, J. W., 975 Waverly Drive. Lexington, 252-0954, 252-3212 
Burton, John, 533— 28th St., Ashland, 324-5964, 324-1111 ext. 

5608 
Carver. Arthur E., 462-A, Fort Knox, 4-2979, 4-6050 
Carrico, John, 3S31 Chatham Road, Louisville. 458-4007. 582- 

4626 
Cowan. Robert L., 3504 Barclay Drive, Jeffersontown, 267- 

6224. JU 7-1121 ext. 387 
Daubert, Wilfred S., 9049-D Deitz Acres, Ft. Knox, 4-5071, 

4-6932 
Devine, Edward J.. 1413 Bluegrass Ave., Louisville 
Dierolf, William H., Jr., OACS C & E Hqs. MAAG, APO 

96263, San Francisco, Calif. 
Dixie, Cornelius P., 608 South Clay, Louisville, 587-7680 
Douthwaite, Donald D.. 6616 Merwin Ave., Cincinnati, Ohio, 

661-0915, 662-0891 
Dryden, Wallace Lee, 163 E. Maxwell, Apt. No. 3-A, Lexing- 
ton, 252-2733 
Duncan, Gilbert F., Jr., 3110 Commander Drive, Louisville, 

GL 8-5144, 366-9661 
Durkin, Jack, 291 Burke Road, Lexington, 254-0146, 2.54-1714 
Duvall, Thomas Jay, 4123 Craig Ave., Louisville 
Elliott, Lamoin, 2738 Grandview, Portsmouth, Ohio 
Ernst, Edward R., Box 75040, Cincinnati, Ohio. 689-7181 
Farish. Merlin J.. 1764 Genung Drive, New Albany, Indiana, 

945-0863, Brandenburg, Ky. 422-2101, ext. 252 
Fey. Allen, 123 Garden Way, Ft. Thomas, 441-6288, 562-5461 
Flynn, Bobby, 428 McKenna Court, Lexington, 299-5902, 265- 

6188 
Foster, Eddie P., 466 Lima Drive, Lexington, 254-0978, 264-7319 
Funkhouser, Roy A., 710 AC & W, Box 1409, Tin City AFS, 

Alaska, 886-1923 
Gentry, W. R., Jr., 101 Oakley Bldg., Bardstown, 348-8903, 

348-3767 
George, Boyce Donald, 611 South 44th St.. Louisville, 776-0133 
Gilligan, Jack, 1146 Tassie Lane, Cincinnati, Ohio, 622-2042 
Grace, H. E., Jr., Middlesboro, 248-1290, Pineville, 337-3320 
Hamilton, Vernon K., 4213 Kirby Ave., Cincinnati, Ohio, 

681-4284 
Hanlon, Pat, 128 A Cliff Road, North Bend, Ohio 
Holeman, D. Fletcher, Commercial Bank of Dawson, Dawson 

Springs 
Holthouser, Terry W., 5322 Georgia Lane, Louisville, 969-3023, 

239--3267 
Horsman, Bill, 512 Iowa St., Louisville 
Hughes, Robert E., 610 East 8th St., Russellville, 726-6334. 

726-6335 
Hunter, James. 4219 Naneen Drive, Louisville, 367-1361 
Johns, Charles. Route No. 3, Fulton, 479-1819 
Kennedy, Philip, 96 Zion Road, Cleves, Ohio 

Kimmel, Bill R., 2932 Washington, Paducah, 442-1214, 443-2433 
Kloufetos, Spiro J., 2702 Pioneer Road, Louisville 
Lykins, Larry L., 1519 Crums Lane, Louisville 
Markham, James R., 371 South Limestone, Lexington, 252- 

5393 
Mayo, Henry L., Jr., 581 College, Paintsville, 789-3871, 789- 

4001 
Overby, H. E., 1931 Upland Drive. Nashville, Tenn., 228-1629, 

262-6301 
Padgett, R. K.. 202 College St., Somerset, 678-5485, 678-4141 
Palmer, Carl A., 10151/, South 6th St., Ironton, Ohio, 632-0291 
Pardue, Israel L., 1005 South 28th St., Louisville, 772-2488, 

774-6011 ext. 631 
Pawley, James Louis, 6000 Jessamine, Louisville, 935-2126, 

684-5201 ext. 363 
Head, Frederick K.. 202 Levassor, Covington, 431-5197, 431-5197 
Rhodes. Cecil, P. O. Box 808, Barbourville 
Roos, Robert, Route No. 1, Chamberlain Lane, Louisville 
Sammons. Terry Lynn, 4308 Burnt Cedar Lane, Louisville, 

964-0852, 587-1121 ext. 533 
Samoya, Frank B., 965 May St.. Milford. Ohio, 831-4209 
Saylors, Carlee, Route No. 3. Murray, 753-7979 
Seale, W. E., Route No. 5, Tates Creek, Lexington, 266-5695, 

255-3600 ext. 6536 

(Continued on Page Six) 



In Memoriam 




KENNETH G. GILLASPIE 

Kenneth G. Gillaspie, former George- 
town City School Superintendent and for- 
mer President of the K.H.S.A.A. Board of 
Control (1962-63), died at the John Graves 
Ford Hospital in Georgetown on September 
7 after a long illness. He was 60. Mr. Gillas- 
pie had been a member of the Board of Con- 
trol for a period of eight years (1955-1963). 

Superintendent from 1952 to 1965, Mr. 
Gillaspie was a past principal of the George- 
town High School. He had been principal 
and superintendent of Morganfield City 
Schools from 1928 to 1939, and he had 
taught at Western Kentucky State College 
and at Georgetown College. 

Mr. Gillaspie held an A.B. degree from 
Georgetown College and an M.A. degi-ee 
from Teachers College, Columbia Univer- 
sity, New York. He had done graduate work 
at George Peabody College, Western Ken- 
tucky State College, and the University of 
Kentucky. He was a member of the Nation- 
al Education Association, American Asso- 
ciation of School Administrators, Pi Kappa 
Delta Forensic Fraternity, Phi Delta Kappa 
and Kappa Delta Pi, Honorary Education 
fraternities, The Rotary Club, The Masonic 
Order, and the Georgetown Baptist Church. 

Survivors include his wife, Mrs. Mary 
W. Gillaspie, Georgetown; two daughters, 
Mrs. Bradford Cammack, Mt. Sterling, and 
Mrs. Warren Wheaton, Lawrenceburg ; two 
granddaughters, Mrs. Ed Glassock and Miss 
Jane Cammack; and two grandsons, Sam 
and Jimmy Conner. 



Paee Four 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR OCTOBER, 196S 



The Flying Dutchman 

The Kentucky High School Athletic Association 
holds a position of national prominence because it has 
always been an organization based on teamwork, 
heart and imagination. 

Let's talk about teamworkl Back during the First 
World War there was a widely quoted verse which 
went like this: 

"It ain't the guns or armaments, or the funds that 
they can pay, 

But the close cooperation that makes them win the 
day. 

It ain't the individual, or the army as a whole. 

But the everlastin' teamwork of every bloomin' 
soul." 

Gordon Wilson, my old English professor at West- 
ern Kentucky State, wouldn't have endorsed the gram- 
mar of the verse but the highly revered bird lovei 
would have been the first to say "Amen" to the lesson 
it teaches. 

When the Dutchman conducts his state-wide clinics 
Kentuckians eveoT/here offer thoir assistance, and 
when Edgar McNabb starts his football training pro- 
gram he Imows that every city, town and hamlet in 
the Commonwealth will start the wheels of cooperation 
turning. When state tournament time comes around, a 
state-wide team goes into action to support the Board 
of Control in a manner constantly amazing to cut-of- 
state visitors. 

It's this teamwork which puts the heart into Ken- 
tucky's schoolboy sports program. Back in 1949 this- 
"everlastin teamwork of every bloomin soul" was 
called on to launch a program ahned at encouraging 
physically handicapped high school boys and girls to 
engage in sports. The K. H. S. A. A. called this the 
Game Guy Program and every youngster involved was 
known as lionhearted and was recognized with the 
lionheart award. 

So it is that the "Cavalcade oi Game Guys" begai 
seventeen years ago, and the "Game Guys" have gone 
■in to successes in later Ufe which many attribute tr 
lessons learned in sports and from the Kentuckians 
who took an interest in them. ( oach Harold Craig, 
assistant to football Coach Dallas "Bia T>addy" Arnold 
at Valle\ High, wins the Corn Cob Pipr of Honor foi 
October for the interest he takes in nnfortunatel\ 
handicapped youngsters. Coach (rait; asks if the list ot 
Game Guvs could be published. It can and here it is 
Harold: 

19-lft Hob Kir<-hdorfei. Shivei.x : imt. Oral Willei 
.■\shland. 19.il. nann\ Hosier, Louis\ille: 1952, Randal 
J>onihU' . l...itfo: 1%?,. Merit (Yawloid H^biaidi 
\ille- 19ii-l. .!(>( Wyi-off, Bardstown: 1955, James Cau 
dill, LouisMlln: 1956, .Edward Ginter, Sterling: 1957 
3 'ann\ Dunt-an, Hazel: 1958. .John St^^wart. Louisvillt 
1959. Sava 'Vlairuni, ?"izahethio\\n, and Fred Radai 
f.asi Bernstadt. 1960. Paul KingrfV , Glasglov>-: 1961 
Bill l>a\is. Hanndshura: 1962. Hnwaid Herndi^n Ir 
Wing": 19H3. David Wood. Park City; 1964, Leamat 
Pipes, Bourbon County: 1965. John Fenip, Good Shep 
herd. 

S' nieho>' > i ■ ika ik, i 'hi im ai m: riKs •' K. i 
ill' ky's Gamt Guys he is reminded of trees and wha' 
\^'illiam Blakt- had to sa\ about them— "To some peo 
pli , a Irei is snmethina .so incr"dilil\ bc.iutilui ti ai j 
brings te-ars iu the eyes: to others it is just a greer 
thing that stands in the way." There is nothing mon 
bi-autiful than a youngster fighting his heart out ti. 
compete, like more foitunate kids, m spurts. Send the 
sior.\ of thf ph\sicallj handicapped bo\ or girl yot: 
aie helping ti The .Fhins: Dutchman JeffersontowTi 
Kentuckx WW 




A if 



rlMKOi-D C><Mlo 

Now, about imagination! The Dutchman extends 
an invitation to every coach, principal and athletic 
director to be his guest at the Kentucky Hotel at 9:00 
A.M. on Thursday, October 20th, to learn about the fab- 
ulous, futuramic hard surfaces which may, in time, 
replace grass on the football fields, golf courses, base- 
ball diamonds and what have you. You've heard about 
the surface of the Astrodome in Texas — now you can 
learn about this surface and others. 

Phil R. Theibert of Brown University, Providence, 
Rhode Island, is the foremost authority in the world 
on these futuramic field and court surfaces, and the 
Dutchman will have him at the Kentucky Hotel for a 
meeting with you Kentuckians to demonstrate, explcun 
and answer your questions. It takes imagination to 
see what the future may hold for sports — but imagi- 
nation is one of the things which has contributed to 
the prominence of our athletic program in Kentucky. 

Ro>- H. Whalin, who coached a group of boys at 
Marrowbone (called the wonder team) in 1925-1926, 
'ells a fantastic but true story of the transportation 
problems his basketball team had to solve to get to 
and from Lexington for the State Tournament. Every 
'•oach should read tliis to his team so that the players 
iia\ count their blessin,gs. Here's the story: 

Marrowbone won the championship of B class in 
ihf District Tourney, and left the next week from 
home in a v\agon pulled by six mules, as no trucks 
w erf able to get through to Glasgow over the muddy 
roads .'^t Glasgow the team transferred to a farm, 
truck to Horse Cave where they boarded a train to 
[,nuis\ille. In Louisville the teani won the champion- 
ship of B class in the regional, and remained over at 
the Seelbach Hotel until time to go to the State Tour- 
nament at Lexington. After losing in the quarter finals 
1(1 the State Champions, M. M. I., the team departed 
till home h> train to Burnside, where they boarded a 
jiacket steamboat down the (Cumberland River (now 
Lake (\unberlandi to BurkesvUle. Here they were met 
h\ their parents and friends for a ride home in a oar, 
\\aaon, horseback, or on foot. The only hard surface 
I'oad in the count\' then was from BurkesviUe to Mar- 
rowbone. 

The pla;ieis on the team had to have courage and 
desire. Let's see how basketball benefited these kids 
and what became of theml Sam Alexander is now As- 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR OCTOBER, 1966 



Page Five 



sistant State Superintendent in the Department of Edu- 
cation in Franlifort; Irvin Huddleston is a successful 
businessman in Harrodsburg; Joe Turner is now cash- 
ier of the bank at Dundee; Paul Strange is in business 
in Marrowbone; while Frank Alexander, Mitch Thur- 
man and Jame5 Davis are successful farmers. 

As the Dutchman goes to press tlie "Marrowbone 
Wonder Team" is planning an October reunion at the 
Alpine Motel in Burkesville. Basketball, football, base- 
ball and the other sports do build men. There wasn't 
a failure on this squad because they learned early how 
to meet problems and solve them. 

From John Bunn, Editor of the Basketball Rule 
Book, comes this comment on the basketball clinic 
program of the K. H. S. A. A., "I don't know why I 
go to the trouble of making an outline. I should wait 
until your program comes along. It is a very complete 
document and I could use it much better than my 
own and I wouldn't have to expend the effort in creat- 
ing one." Praise from John Bunn constitutes "Praise 
from Caesar" — The two greatest basketball authorities 
in the world are John Bunn and Cliff Fagan. An Abou 
Ben Adhem award is going to each of these gentlemen 
— may their tribe increase! 

Here's the Dutchman's closing gem — "A failure is 
a man who has blundered but is not able to cash in 
on the experience." 



KAPOS NEWS 

1966 SCHOLARSHIP AWARDED 

Miss Cheri L. Steen, daughter of Mrs. Rebeccvi 
Johnson and Mr. Bernard L. Steen, has won the 1966 
$500 educational scholarship awarded by the Ken- 
tucky Association of Pep Organization Sponsors. Cheri 
lives with her mother at 204 Scotland Avenue, Frank- 
lin, Kentucky, and is a graduate of Franklin-Simpson 
High School. The selection was made by Dr. Elbert 
W. Ockerman, Dean of Admission and Registrar at the 
University of Kentucky. The selection is based on: 
scholarship, citizenship and need for financial assis- 
tance. 

Mr. Ronald W. Clark, Principal of Franklin-Simp- 
son, has this to say about Cheri; "I can truly say, and 
'with no reservations, this girl is one of the finest 
young ladies with whom I have ever been associated. 
Cheri is a leader. Some of the activities she has par- 
ticipated in are as follows: Beta Club (3 years), FHA 
(3 years) Pep Club member, Chorus member, class 
officer (4 years) Girls' Athletic Association, Student 
Council (3 years), Girls State, Annual Staff, Speech 
Club, Track Team, Junior and Senior Play, Homecom- 
ing Queen, and Runner-up as Basketball Sweetheart. 
Her classmates love her. Her teachers admire and re- 
spect her. She makes things go and never stops until 
her job is completed. Even though she is constantly 
'busy with school activities, she never fails to come 
prepared for the classroom portion of educational 
learning. She has taken college preparatory work and 
has a 3.8 of a possible 4.0, ranking fourth out of 180 
students." 

Cheri has enrolled as a student at Western Ken- 
tucky University and the members of K.A.P.O.S. who 
have made this scholarship possible wish her luck. 
They will be watching her educational progress with 
maternal interest. 

WHERE DOES THE SCHOLARSHIP MONEY 
COME FROM? 

This is the third $500 scholarship to be awarded by 
K.A.P.O.S. and part of the money comes from school 
$2.00 membership fee. So, Principals who haven't paid 
their school's 1966 dues for membership in K.A.P.O.S. 
are urged to send the $2.00 to Mrs. Stella S. Gilb at 




(Lef^ to Right) Mrs. Herbert Weddington, Cheri Steen, 
Mrs. Rebecca Johnson. 

the University of Kentucky. Make the check payable to 
K.A.P.O.S. . . . Dedicated, hard working sponsors 
earn the major portion of the scholarship fund. One 
such sponsor is Mrs. Janet Moore of Bowling Green 
High School. Between now and October 29, Mrs. Moore 
will spend many hours preparing for the fall 
K.A.P.O.S. one-day clinic to be held at her school. All 
monies realized from this clinic will go toward current 
expenses and the scholarship fund. 
NEWS OF THE FALL CLINIC 

DATE, October 29, 1966; PLACE, Bowling Green 
High School Gymnasium; TIME, 8:30 a.m.-3:30 p.m.; 
COST, $2.50 per Cheerleader. Sponsors are admitted 
free. 

More detailed information has been mailed to each 
school. For additional information, contact Mrs. Janet 
.Moore at Bowling Green High School. 

This is not a competitive clinic. It is designed to 
give Cheerleaders outstanding professional instruction! 
.MEET THE NEW AND OLD 
K.A.P.O.S. BOARD MEMBERS 

Some seventy-five sponsors attended the luncheon 
and business meeting held on the University of Ken- 
tucky campus August 11. Plans for the 1966-67 school 
year were discussed and ideas for increasing school 
spirit were exchanged as well as money making proj- 
ects for the purchasing of cheerleader outfits. The fol- 
lowing new board members were introduced: Miss 
Sara Jo Cardweli, Franklin-Simpson; Mrs. Eleanor 
Fothergill, Carroll County; Mrs. Grace Fragstein (re- 
elected), Lafayette; Mrs. Ollie Leathers, Frankfort; 
Miss Matilda Walker, Westport. 

Other Board Members are: Mrs. Lari-y Tesar, 
President, Fort Knox Jr.; Miss Jane Meyer, Vice- 
President, Shelbyville; Mrs. Stella S. Gilb, Secretai-y- 
Treasurer, University of Kentucky; Mrs. Gloria 
Knuckles Compton, Bryan Station; Miss Linda Spauld- 
ing, Bardstown; Mrs. Herbert Weddington, Franklin 
County. 

Listed below are the names of paid-up K.A.P.O.S. 
members, with the names of the schools which they 
represent. Membership expiration dates are October, 
1966; February, 1957; and August, 1967. 

Ashland, Marie Hamm; Augusta, Mrs. Margaret 
Kelsch; Bardstown, Linda Spaulding; BeDevue, Sally 
Meng; Bowling Green, Mrs. Janet Moore; Bremen, 
Becky Capps; Bryan Station, Mrs. Gloria Compton; 
Central City, Mrs. Nancy Carr; Crittenden County, 
Dunbar, Mrs. Wright; Edmonson County, Mrs. Richard 
Potter; Fort Knox Junior, Mrs. Julie Tesar; Foit 



Page Six 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR OCTOBER, 1966 



Knox Senior— Mrs. Robert Burrow, Mrs. Jane McCoy; 
Franklin Countj', Mrs. Herbert Weddington; Frank- 
lin-Simpson, Sara Jo Cardwell: George Rogers Clark. 
Mrs. Paul Smith; Grant County; Greenville, iViiss Jo- 
anna Fo.x; Harlan County, Mrs. James Ledington; 
Harrison County, Mi-s. Mackey Bell; Hazai'd, Miss J. 
Shackleford; Hellier. Sonja Sanders; Henderson Coun- 
ty, Mrs. Donald Behogg; Henry County — Mrs. Averj- 
Holland, Mrs. Kenneth Thompson; Holy Cross— Mrs. 
Trudy Bezold, Mrs. Ruth Schneider; Jackson Junior, 
Miss Lucy B. Tinsley. 

Lafayette, Mrs. Grace Fragstein; Lebanon, Mrs. 
Caroline Polk; Lexington Catholic, Mrs. Mary Haney; 
Lone Oak, Mrs. Landa Nagel; Loretto, Jean Daugher- 
ty; Louisville duPont Manual, Miss Patsy Brantley; 
Ludlow, Donna Wenderoth; Lyon County, Mrs. Lou 
Cunningham; Martin, Nancy Sue Dingus; Maysville, 
Mercy Academy, Kenwyn Boyle; Middlesboro, Mrs. 
Opla Patterson; Morton Junior, Mrs. Susan Burckle; 
North Marshall; Ohio County, Mollie Ingram; Owens- 
boro. Miss Pat Hughbanks; Paducah Tilghman, Rose- 
mary Rudolph; Paintsville, Mrs. Patsy Johnson; Park- 
er-Bennett, Randy Kimbrough; Red Bird, Mrs. Don 
Feddersen; Reidland, Mrs. Ann Walker; Rosenwald, 
Joyce Willoughby, Russell, Sally Duncan; Shawnee, 
Sidney Stone; Shelbyville, Jane Meyer; Somerset, Mrs. 
Hazel Ping; Stanford, Mrs. Barbara Leach; Tates 
Creek, Mrs. Caroline Brown; Temple Hill, Mrs. Ruth 
Blair; Thomas Jefferson, Mrs. Barbara Longacre; 
University of Kentuck-y— Mrs. Stella S. Gilb, Mrs. Bert 
Cox; 'Wayne County, Shirley Mikel; Westport, Matilda 
Walker; Woodford County, Mrs. Pat Scott. 

If you do not find your school listed and you think 
you are a paid-up member, please notify Mrs. Gilb so 
that your school can be added before the next publi- 
cation. Since cheerleader sponsors change from year 
to year, it is hard for us to keep our files up to date. 
Please include the name of your sponsor along vwth 
your check. 

Stella S. Gilb 

Secretary-Treasurer, K.A.P.O.S. 



FOOTBALL OFFICIALS 

(Continued from Page Three) 

Selv.v. Curt, 118 Earls, Corbin. 528-4677, 528-4G77 

Sharp, Robert J., 2909 Jessup Road, Cincinnati, Ohio 

Sizemore, Aster. Hazard, 436-2112, 436-5361 

Smith, James V., Heidrick, 546-3293, 546-3441 

Stigger, Charles E., 1020 St. Paul Court, Apt. 3, Louisville. 

683-5177, 587-8854 
Sullivan, Thomas E., 5104 Woodhill Lane. Louisville, 969- 

2927, 684-5269 
Thompson, Ralph, 649 Ivyhill, Cincinnati, Ohio, 922-7319 
Treibly, Charles E.. 3316 Noe Way No. 10, Louisville, 451- 

8448, 451-9301 
Vaughan, John T., 1004 Exchange, Union City, Tenn., 885- 

6246, 886-0261 
Vaughan, Richard, 3016 Evans St.. Ashland, 324-6076 
Vennell, Robert H., 920 Seventh Ave., Huntington, W. Va. 
Vinson, Casie, 637 Paris Pike, McKenzie, Tenn., 352-3315, 352- 

3985 
Vinciguerra, Phillip, Matewan, W. Va. 

Visscher, Robert W.. 3631-B Conroy Ave., Ft. Knox, 4-5769 
Vissman, Charles P., 1104 Queen Ave., Louisville, 366-0832, 

JU 7-1121 ext. 472 
Wagner, Jim, 3018 Dale Ann Drive, Louisville, 458-9060 
Waide, Harry D., 250 E. Arch. Madisonville, 821-1998, 821-3870 
Waller, Bobbie E., 309 Strathmore, Lexington, 299-6123, 299- 

6123 
Walker. Julian R., 670 Hill-N-Dale Rd., Lexington, 277-7269. 

Frankfort 564-4590 
Walker. Paul R., Resei-voir Park, Bowling Green, 843-8893, 

843-3249 
Walter, Lafayette, 56th Street, Ashland, 324-7585 
Wanchic, Nicholas, 1511 Forbes Road, Lexington, 256-1233, 

252-8328 
Warren, Buist Buzz, 248 Univei-sity, Radcliff, 531-3570, Ft. 

Knox 4-1231 
Warren, Ken, 45 Meadowview Dr., Louisville, 454-5001, 634- 

1551, ext. 258 
Warren, Paul J., 6467 F Eustis Ave., Ft. Knox, 4-2467, 4-6950 
Washaleski, Ti'omas V., 4003 Dellafay, Louisville, 964-6920, 

JU 4-5269 



Washer, James P., 4119 Sunflower, Louisville, 447-6817, 637- 

0396 
Washer, Robert Stanley, Jr., 3205 Huberts Dr., Louisville, 

447-3078, 774-2341 ext. 218 
Watts, Shirley R., 228 St. Ann. Lexington, 266-1749, 262-5494 
Weaver, Clyde Ivan, Box 254, Williamson, W. Va. 
Webb. Dudley, 1646 Maywick, Lexington, 278-2904. 278-2904 
Weber, Thomas C, 3707 St. Gei-maine. Louisville, 896-4298 
Webner, J. Randall, 607 Wallace, Louisville, 896-5036, 969-9363 
Welch, Bill, 1324 Beech, Cincinnati, Ohio, 471-8090, 271-9754 
Welch. J. D., 2608 Forest Ave., Ashland, 324-3337, 324-1155 

ext. 367 
Welsh. Patrick J., 834 Beech Ave., Louisville, 363-4132 
Welch, Robert, J., 1406 Beech, Cincinnati, Ohio, 471-3408 
Werkowitz, Jack, 4614 Miller, Blue Ash, Ohio, 791-5382, 791- 

6870 
West. John. Route No. 4, Hickman, 236-3295, 236-2521 
White, James (Pete), 301 Smith Ave., Cumberland, 689-4987, 

848-5486 
Whitmore, N. Paul, 1001 Main St., West Point, Ft. Knox 

4-2555 
Whittemore, Paul F.. R. A. 11161909, U. S. Army. Hq. Area 

Comd., Special Services, APO 96243, San Francisco, 

Calif. 
Wiekham, James Robert, 311 Cathedral Manor, Bardstown. 

348-5282, 833-4612 
Wilbert, Donald A., 3504 Indian Trail, Louisville, 969-8733 
Wilbert, Louis Joseph. 3504 Terrier Lane, Louisville, 458-4092. 

584-3131 
Willey, Harold L., 2214 Inwood, Huntington, W. Va. 
Williams, Bert 0., 953 Lucy Lane, Lexington, 254-8377, 252-2626 
Williams, Gene. 304 Deepwood Dr., Elizabethtown, 765-4831, 

765-4191 
Williams, James H., Elmwood Drive, South Shore, 932-4372, 

932-3055 
Willis, Donald A., Box No. 5, Allen, 874-2485, 285-3407 
Willis, Jim, Box 1332, Logan, W. Va. 
Wilson, John Pope, 812 E. Main St., Louisville, 585-4691, 245- 

4121 ext. 230 
Wilson. Louis O., 728 Wellington Way, Lexington, 277-6374, 

254-1715 
Wise, Billy V., 240 St. Ann Drive, Lexington. 266-7449, 252- 

6494 
Wise, Jack, 209 Pocohontas, Georgetown, 863-3948, 863-1393 
Womack, William H., 517 Cherry, Henderson, VA 6-4526, VA 

6-3781 
Wray, Robert F., 29 Belle Monte, So. Ft. Mitchell, 331-2594, 

341-4579 
Wright, James Lloyd, 121 Showalter Drive, Georgetown, 863- 

3628, 252-2250 ext. 3280 
Wurtz, Emil, 18 East 4th St., Cincinnati, Ohio, 471-0526, 381- 

1232 
Wyatt. William J., 116 Bellemeade Rd., Louisville, 895-3277, 

895-3277 
Yanity, Joseph B. Jr., 42 Utah Place, Athens, Ohio, 693-6464, 

593-7771 
Yates, Lt. Col. W. H., U. S. Army Armor Center, Ft. Knox 
Yost, Carl W., Box 421, Brandenburg, 422-2661, 422-2101 ext. 

381 
Young, Jack T., 121 Smith Ballard, Richmond, 623-4589, 623- 

2334 
Zaranka, Benny J., 165 St. William Dr., Lexington, 266-6435. 

255-6666 
Zehnder, Mel R., 6889 Green Meadow Circle, Louisville, 893- 

2071, 893-2071 
Zehner, Albert, 9802 Watterson, Jeffersontown, 267-1677 
Zimmer, Tom, 114 Summit Drive. Crestview Hills, So. Ft. 

Mitchell, 341-4566. 431-4272 
Zlamal, Raymond K., Cooperstown, Bldg. G. Lexington, 324- 

4601 



MINUTES OF MEETING 

K.H.S.A.A. GYMNASTICS COMMITTEE 

Lexington. Ky., September 8, 1966 

The first meeting was called to order at 7:00 P.M. 
by Chairman Bernard Johnson in the office of the 
Commissioner. 

The following people were present: Ted Sanford, 
Joe BiUy Mansfield, Bob Wason, Herb Lewis, Barney 
Groves, Tom Mahanes and James Caudill. 

Mr. Sanford opened the meeting by a brief back- 
ground of events leading to the establishment of this 
committee. The purpose is to plan and develop a state 
high school gymnastics tournament. 

Mr. Sanford also called to the attention of the 
committee that statements had been returned by sev- 
eral schools with definite intentions of participating in 
such an event if provided. 

The committee then discussed the feasibility of 
including competition for girls as well as boys. It was 
unanimously agreed that competition would be recom- 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR OCTOBER, 1966 



Page Seven 



mended to the Board of Control for boys and girLs. 

At this point, the committee turned to the business 
of establishing the events and levels of competition for 
the tournament. After a lengthy discussion, the com- 
mittee agreed to have one level of competition for the 
following events: 

BOYS' EVENTS— Floor Exercise, Side Horse, Par- 
allel Bars, Horizontal Bar, Rings, Vaulting, Trampo- 
line-special event, Tumbling-special event, All-Around. 

GIRLS' EVENTS— Floor Exercise, Uneven Paral- 
lel Bars, Vaulting, Balance Beam, Trampoline-spe- 
cial event. Tumbling-special event, All-Around. 

It was further agreed that each competing school 
will be limited to a maximum of five (5) participants 
in each event, with the understanding that three (3) 
of these five participants would be designated as All- 
Around performers. 

In addition, agreement prevailed that scoring 
would be arranged on a basis of six (6) places receiv- 
ing points, with first place receiving seven points, sec- 
ond place receiving five points, third place receiving 
four points, fourth place receiving three points, fifth 
place receiving two points and sixth place receiving 
one point. 

It was the unanimous opinion of the committee 
members that two judges should be used for each 
event, and that it be recommended to the Board of 
Control that appropriate trophies and awards should 
be given in line with established Board policy. 

A date and place for the tournament were the next 
items to be discussed. 

It was suggested that, since a great number of 
Louisville schools will be represented in this tourna- 
ment, and since the University of Louisville has re- 
cently held a number of gymnastic meets in their new 
facility, this initial Kentucky State Gymnastics Tour- 
nament be conducted Saturday, April 1, 1967, in Louis- 
ville, at the Crawford Gym on the University of Louis- 
ville Campus. To this suggestion, the committee unani- 
mously agreed. 

With respect to the manner in which the tourna- 
ment will be conducted, the rules and regulations as 
set forth by the United States Gymnastics Federation 
will prevail where applicable. 

In order to further clarify procedures and regula- 
tions for participating schools, the committee asked 
[Mr. Bernard Johnson and Mr. Bob Wason to be re- 
sponsible for compiling a fact sheet for distribution to 
the schools. 

The meeting was adjourned at 9:00 P.M. 



FOOTBALL QUESTIONS 

(Continued from Page One) 
Ruling: Forward pass interference by A in (a). In 
(b), it is an illegal forward pass. In (a), the down 
counts and the penalty is 15 yards from the previous 
spot unless the act by A6 is unsportsmanlike in which 
case an additional 15 yards would be added. In (b), 
the penalty is 5 yards and it is measured from the 
spot where the run ended (where the pass was thrown) 
and the down counts. 

14. Play: While a kick-off or a punt is in flight, 
Kl purposely loosens his helmet's chin-strap, and then 
removes the helmet from Ws head. 

Ruling: Unsportsmanlike conduct. 

15. Play: During a charged time-out, coach of 
team A has a conference with A7 approximately 4 
yards inside the sideline, on the field of play, in front 
of his team's box. Team A huddles: (a) about 5 yards 
from A7 and his coach; or (b) at the inbounds mark 
directly in front of team box of A; or (c) in the side 
zone in the vicinity of the 20-yard fine. 

Ruling: The rules' coverage for holding confer- 
ences requires that they be limited to one player and 



one of his coaches. The committee, in liberalizing the 
coaching rule, had no disposition whatever to expand 
this privilege. The interpretation provides — "players 
may not congregate in front of the bench for confer- 
ence purposes." In (a) the attending official will di- 
rect the team A players huddling to move out into the 
playing field, at least, to the inbounds line, preferably 
further. In (b) and (c), the location of the huddling 
players is judged to be acceptable. During the confer- 
ence, the coach is required to direct his remarks 
to the plalyer meeting with him. This is not an oppor- 
tunity for the coach to give directions and instructions 
to the entire team. Officials know the coverage, and 
its limiting character. They must, therefore, be cer- 
tain its purpose is not abused. 

16. Play: During a punt return, R6 clips. The foul 
is indicated. Coadh of team R shouts to his captain to 
accept the penalty. 

Ruling: It was not the apparent intention of the 
committee, in its revision of 9-6-1-a, to alter the re- 
sponsibility of the team captain to make the decisions 
regarding penalty options. However, the present cover- 
age does not prohibit a coach from calling out such 
instructions. Therefore, a coach's indication of his op- 
tion preference is not in itself an unsportsmanlike act. 
But, the captain, under no circumstances, may ask the 
coach for his preference. Neither may the captain de- 
lay his decision in order to learn which option his 
coach would prefer. If a coach shouting directions con- 
fuses, delays or interferes with the referee's explana- 
tion of the options or the captain's decision, the ref- 
eree is obligated to order the coach to refrain and, if 
this is not done immediately, a penalty for delay is in 
order. Referees are advised to take the captains from 
the vicinity of the team box or boxes when informing 
them of the infraction and options. It is well to have 
the captains face in a direction other than that of the 
respective boxes. 

17. Play: What are some situations, other than 
those involving an official's time-out, in which the 
referee will signal the clock to start after the ready- 
for-play signal? 

Ruling: The referee may start the clock hnmedi- 
ately following the ready-for-play signal if a player 
has deliberately fouled for the ostensible purpose of 
having the clock stopped. Such fouls usually, but cer- 
tainly not without exception, occur near the end of a 
period. Included among these fouls are encroachment 
and an intentionally grounded forward pass. The ref- 
eree is also instructed to start the clock with the 
ready-for-play signal if a backward pass is thrown 
out of bounds for the apparent purpose of stopping the 
clock. 

18. Play: Following a fair catch at the left in- 
bounds line, R snaps from the center of his 20-yard- 
line. K is offside and the penalty is: (a) accepted; or 
(b) dechned. 

Ruling: In (a), R may snap from any place be- 
tween the inbounds lines on his 25-yardline. In (b), 
the snap will be made from the succeeding spot. 



Registered Basketball Officials 
of the K.H.S.A.A— 1966-1967 

(List Compiled September 23) 

If one telephone namber is given for an official listed 
it is the home phone number unless otherwise designated. If 
two numbers are given, the first number is that of the home 
phone. 

Abell, James A., 175 Charlotte Ann Drive, Paducah, 444-5555, 

442-5484 
Abell, Richard, 1804 Melrose Drive, Bowling Green, 843-3178, 

745-2791 
Abney, David W., 7206 Lorenzo Lane, Louisville, 239-7175 
Adams, Roy D., 302 Brunswick Rd., Louisville 



Pace Eieht 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR OCTOBER, 1966 



Adams. William M.. Letcher. 633-7787, 633-2524 

Agree. Danny B., Beech Creek, 476-8048 

Akridge, Dean, Bo.i 156, Fredonia. 545-3398, 545-3332 

Alexander, Howard S.. Route No. 2. Lebanon Rd., Crittenden, 

823-5621, 824-4325 
Ale.i:ander. Rex E., 1320 Wells Blvd.. Murray. 753-3579, 762- 

3575 
Alexander. Ronnie G., Box 109. Boonville, Indiana 897-2423 
Allen. J. Mack, Route No. 3, Box 418, Ashland, 325-1918, 324- 

7131 
Allen, James D., Martin. 285-3442, 285-3082 
Allen. James W., 3444 Monel Ave., Huntington. W. Va. 
Allen, Nelson Robert, 331 Riverside Drive, Russell, 836-5352, 

836-8915 
Allen, Willard. Route No. 1, Box 32, Jackson. 666-2833 
Anders. Raleigh A., General Delivery, Corbin, 528-2861, 528- 

3912 
Anderson, George, 102 Third St., Manchester. 598-2714. 598-2778 
Archibald, Larry. 216 Riverside Drive, Augusta, 756-3882 
Ard. L. J., Route No. 4. Nancy 
Arflin. Tracy T.. Lot 24 Terrell's Trailer Court. Oak Grove, 

439-4475, Ft. Campbell 798-4417 
Arnold. Gabriel Thomas, 104 Tanglewood Trail, Anchorage, 

895-6243. 637-1421 ext. 205 
Asher, Tony J.. 807 Main St.. Sturgis, 333-2637, 389-1454 
Baird, Bill. Box 842, Hazard, 436-5443. 436-6443 
Baker, Billy B.. 395 Sagasser. Somerset. 679-3072. 679-1121 
Baker. Ralph Everett. 126 W. Forest Ave.. Hodgenville, 358- 

3196 (Bus.) 
Baker, Robert M.. Jr.. 324 Springhill Road, Danville, 236-2092, 

236-5371 
Balkcom. Otis. 199 W. Main. Wilmore. 858-3463 
Ball. John C, Box 96, Oil Springs. 297-3546, 349-3044 
Ballaban. Thomas. 1103 Archland Drive. Cincinnati, Ohio, 

522-3024, 761-7600 
Balser, James L., 431 Peach Orchard, Pikeville. 437-4619. 437- 

7323 
Bankemper. Thomas. 317 East 7th St., Newport, 581-5047 
Barker, Walter D.. P. O. Box 1411, Friendship, Ohio, 858- 

1967. 353-0190 
Barnette, Jerry. Route No. 1. Box 455. Pikeville, 432-2328 
Bates. Bob. 2732 Sunrise, Portsmouth. Ohio. 354-2168. 354-2168 
Bates, Gardner, Jr., 418 Kentucky Ave., Whitesburg, 633-7174, 

633-2961 
Baugh. Rodney D.. 441 Oak St.. Ludlow, 581-5995 
Begley. Jack, 1502 Florence, Middletown, Ohio, 423-4279, 425- 

3681 
Begley, James P.. 161 King St., Hazard, 436-2398, 436-3634 
Beheler, Donald S.. 311 Springhill Drive, Paris, 987-1728, Lex- 
ington 252-2260 ext. 3236 
Bell. Clarence T.. 1228 South 41st St., Louisville, 778-7792, 

582-5573 
Bennett. Gene, Van Dyke Ave., Wheelersburg. Ohio. 776-2656, 

456-4191 
Bennett. Robert K., 1129 Kiowa Trail, Frankfort, 223-0446. 

223-0446 
Benningfield. Jerry, Western Ky. University, Bowling Green, 

746-3754 (Bus.) 
Bentley. James. Shelby Gap 
Benzinger, Joseph. 3602 Behymer Road. Cincinnati, Ohio, 752- 

3932. 742-2191 
Berger. John D.. Jr.. 26 Myers Lane. Allison Park, Pa., 

767-4931. 621-3500 ext. 264 
Bero, James J., Box 968. Williamson. W. Va. 
Berry. William. 1633 Jackson St.. Portsmouth. Ohio. 353-6765 
Bivins, George W., 3105 Talisman Road, Louisville, 459-5111, 

895-0525 
Bisig, George, 3511 Pentagon Court, Louisville, 458-5717, 458- 

5717 
Bisig. Roland A,, 2419 Broadmeade Road. Louisville. 464-3797, 

896-9188 
Blackburn. Viley O., 210 College. Somerset. 678-8986. 678-8171 
Blum. Martin. P. O. Box 658, Morehead St. University, More- 
head 
Bocook. Earl. 1103 Beech St.. Kenova, W. Va. 
Bowling, Roy. Fields Lane, London 864-5006, 864-5181 
Bradley, Merlin, Gordon 
Bradshaw, Frank C, 6900 Springdale, Evansville. Ind., 424- 

8438, 424-8268 
Brashear. Loy Ray, Route No. 1. Glendale, 854-2921, Radcliff 

351-3147 
Breeden. Charles William. Box 212, Mt. Washington, 538-4897, 

543-2494 
Brill. John W.. Route No. 1. Williamstown. 823-5041 
Briscoe. Hubert. Route No. 3. Shelbyville. 633-4669. 633-2543 
Brizendine, Vic, 2711 Lakeside Drive, Louisville, 454-6843, 589- 

9111 
Broaddus. William D.. 643 Limestone, c/o D. E. McDaniel, Lex- 
ington. 252-8804. 348-3886 
Brock. Alben. Kettle Island, 337-5027 

Brock. John H.. 611 Virginia Ave., Pineville, 337-2463, 337-2439 
Brookbank. Donald. P. O. Box 61, Higginsport, Ohio, 375-4254, 

376-4254 
Brown, Billy C, Apt. 9, Ky. Towers Apts., Berea, 986-8235, 

623-3641 
Brown, E. C, Box 312. Liberty. 787-7276. 787-7191 
Brown. Fred V., 705 Bellfonte Road. Ashland, 325-2868 
Brown, J. Carlton, 411 O'Hara Drive, Danville, 236-3474, 236- 
6618 



Browning, Earl E., 8715 Blossom Lane, Louisville, 425-2937, 

425-2541 
Buchanan, William R., 19 Deerfield Drive, Delaware, Ohio. 

363-1107 (Bus. I 
Buis, Nathaniel A.. Fair St., Liberty, 787-6714, 787-6161 
Bunn. Harold, 2523'.. Collis Ave., Huntington, W. Va. 
Burch. Billy Wayne. 220 East 6th St,. London 
Burchett. Carroll, 403 Broadway, Paintsville, 265-2728. 789-5662 
Burchett, Lanier S., 321 Herndon Ave., Stanford, 365-2581, 

365-2126 
Burke. Harry, 328 Arnold Ave., Prestonsburg, TU 6-2796, TU 

6-2385 
Burkett. Garvis Gene, Route No. 1, Box 65-A, Nancy, 871-3086, 

678-4942 
Burkhart, James G., Box 169. Loyall, 673-1437, 664-3444 
Burrows. Walter H.. Jr., Lee Road, Paducah, 442-8335, 443-1758 ' 
Butcher, Douglas Meally, 789-5563 
Butcher. Granville, Williamsport 

Butler, Jack K., 2604 Fourth Ave., Huntington, W. Va. 
Butler, Robert, 1330 Maple Ave.. Owensboro. 684-7016, 684-6285 
Butner. Billy M., Route No. 2, Box 616, Lancaster, 792-3503, 

792-3503 
Cain, John Wiley, 226 Field St., Cumberland. 589-4102 
Cain. Ron, 3038 Wedge Wood Way, Louisville, 459-2442, 451- 

4330 
Caldwell. James A., 162 Clover Ridge, Ft. Thomas, 441-1626, 

397-2487 
Calitri, Donald Lynn, Box 481, Union College, Barbourville, 

646-3775, 546-4151 
Callahan, Thomas Joseph. 834 Hermosa Ave.. Cincinnati, Ohio, 

471-0768, 721-4787 
Campbell, George H., Jr., 116 Winchester, Middlesboro, 248- 

6882. 248-5643 
Campbell, John, Jr., Box 68. Garrett. 358-3061, 358-3461 
Campbell. Keller B., 630 South Gay Place. Lexington, 254-1347, 

252-2200 ext. 2601 
Cannon, Chester E., Route No. 2. Madisonville. 821-7602 
Canter. John, 2826 Esther Blvd., Louisville, 451-8218, 587-8862 
Cantrell, Hubert E., Campton. 668-6280, 668-6511 
Carney. Robert L., 3741 Glenmeade Rd., Louisville, 454-0327 
Carter, Phillip Ray, Whitley City, 376-2517 

", -V -M ■ dr-i.'gN 942-2723 
Carr, Billy W.. Longview Drive, Franklin, 686-6355 
Carr. Gene P.. 2210 Phelps St., Ashland, 324-8566, 324-1155 

ext. 377 
Caruso. Dick. 1150 Wellspring Drive, Cincinnati, Ohio, 521- 

3349. 421-3300 
Cash, Randall E., 5107 Robbs Lane, Louisville, 969-6453, 367-1721 
Cassity. Gordon, Route No. 2, Box 136K. Catlettsburg. 739-6200 
Castle. Jack, Route No. 2. Pikeville. GE 7-4367, GE 7-4367 
Chaney, Leroy Michael, Box 1000, Pine Knot. 354-3466 
Chattin, Ernest P., 615 17th Street. Ashland. 324-2665, 324-6191 
Chinn. Mike, 725 Scherm Road, Owensboro. 684-0637. 684-2332 
Cisco. Robert N., 403 Highland Ave., Vine Grove, 877-5548, 

Ft. Knox 4-4445 
Clardv. Barry D., Route No. 2. Box 188C. Greenville, 338-3510, 

338-3036 
Clark, Charles L., 2315 Brighton Drive. Louisville, 469-3540 
Clark. Tom. 430 Spalding Ave.. Lebanon. 692-2034 
Clemmons. Sam, 635 Central Ave., Lexington, 266-3562, 255- 

5735 
Click, Ezra. 323 North Maple. Somerset. 678-8688 
Cline, Allen D., Orchard Heights, Hazard, 436-5917, 436-2141 
Clusky. Joe, Box 296. Red Jacket. W. Va. 
Cochran, Eoy H., Jr., 713 Caldwell, Corbin, 528-1697, London 

864-4330 
Cole, Dickie, Box 265, Sweeden. 697-3191 
Coleman, Charles R., 536 Columbia Ave., Lexington, 254-2673, 

259-1699 
Coleman. C. Ronald, 6978 Taylor Mill, Independence. 356-2002, 

681-1210 
Coleman. Daniel Lee, 3 East 41st St., Covington, 201-2388, 

431-3207 
Coleman. James E.. Box 2, Phelps. 456-3691 

Colley, Lynn, 411 East 23rd St.. Hopkinsville, 885-9538, 886-7775 
Collins. C. E., 35 Rosehill Drive, Clarksville. Tenn., 647-0164, 

798-4411 
Collins, Hubert, Wittensville, 297-3152. 789-3585 
Collins, Jack, 8333 Jadwin Drive, Cincinnati, Ohio, 821-7791, 

621-4950 
Combs. Clarence, 1409 Elm St., Jackson 

Combs, Franklin D., 108 Thistleton Terrace Apts., Frank- 
fort. 564-3040 (Bus.) 
Combs. Keith A., 4519 Covert Ave., Evansville, Ind., 477-2869, 

476-3051 
Combs, W. Eugene, Route No. 2, Box 239, Hazard, 261-2460, 

436-5441 
Condra, Kenneth P., Box 736, Pineville, 337-5134. 337-5210 
Conley. Connie B., Church St., Paintsville, 789-5449 
Conley. Ted L., 4725 Nottingham Court, Ashland, 325-3232, 

324-6343 
Conn, Delano, Printer 
Conn, Jerry L., Farmers 

Cooksey, Marvin O.. 5906 Orville Drive. Louisville 969-3585 
Cooper. John F., 512 East 3rd St.. Augusta. 756-3176, 756-4422 
Cooper, Warren, 120 Barber Court, Morehead, 784-4295, 784- 

4164 
Copley, Sidney M.. Box 352, Delbarton, W. Va. 
Cornelison, Walter L., Bybee, 369-5631, 369-5450 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR OCTOBER, 1966 



Page Nine 



Coi-nett, John M.. 2109 Winterbeiry, Lexington, 278-1578, 

252-8166 
Cornett, Ray, Gilley 
Correll. Elmei- Eugene, 72 Horseshoe Drive, Paris, 987-4599, 

987-2550 
Cosby, Carel. 558 Magie Ave., Hamilton, Ohio, 895-7289, Mid- 

dletown, 423-4491 
Cox, Alva J., 705 Bryan Road, Evansville, Ind., 425-8793, 422- 

4151 
Cox, Colin Kelly, Bluegrass, Hazard, 436-3945 
Coy. Charlie S., Boston 

Cravens, Robert L., 2707 South 6th St., Louisville, 637-2361 
Crawford. Jeri-y, Forrest Drive, Lawrenceburg, 839-6333 
Crawford, W. Gordon, 2609 Kings Highway, Louisville, GL 

1-5906, SP 8-5631 ext. 278 
Critz, George A., 116 Shady Lane. Lexington, 278-2937, 252- 

7963 
Croft, Lewis. 539 West Center, Madisonville, 821-2227, 821-7381 
Crook, Bill, Route No. 2, Box 175, Corbin, 528-5277, 528-5277 
Crosthwaite, John S., Jr., 8139 Elbow Lane N.. St. Petersburg, 

Fla., 344-7651, 898-2141 
Grouse, James W.. Route No. 1, Box 276, Dixon, ME 9-5145 
Crutcher, Joseph Lamar, 115 Edelen, Vine Grove, 877-2448, 

Ft. Knox 4-3837 
CuUum, Harold D., 3943 Rhodes Ave., New Boston, Ohio, 456- 

5229. 456-4569 
Gulp Ronald D., 317 Walnut St., Bellevue, 261-7834, 243-4076 
Gulp, Willard E., 318 Skyline Park Drive, Hopkinsville, 886- 

7967, 798-5861 
Cummins, Ray E.. Box 327, Campion, 668-3016, 668-3016 
Cunningham, Jack D.. Majestic 
Cunningham, Julian R.. Route No. 2, Mt. Sterling, 498-2492, 

498-2250 
Curry, Ronald K.. Box 422. Virgie, 639-4586, 639-2832 
Curtis, Douglas E., 4962 Cobb Drive, Dayton, Ohio, 256-4530, 

257-1100 ext. 73607 
Dame, L. J., 2925 McAlister Place, Owensboro, 684-6681, 683- 

2401 ext. 238 
Daniel, Roger T., 1105 Madison Ave., Paintsville, 789-3372, 

Prestonsburg 886-2311 
Daniels, Robert A., Van Lear 
Daniels. Bob, 709 Wesleyan Park, Owensboro, 684-9393, 683- 

4795 
Dann, Nick, 331 Bay.s Ave., Morehead, 784-5646, 784-6040 
Daugherty, Elwood Box 111. Irvine, 723-3044. 723-3616 
Daum, Charles A., 216 Christ Road, Evansville, ind., 424-0217. 

425-4309 
Davenport, Bowman, Box 62, Clarkson, 259-3398, 242-3061 
Davenport, James E.. Dawson Hill Rd., Jeffersontown, 239- 

6667, 454-7511 ext. 3947 
Davis. Ralph C, 1326 South 7th St., Ironton, Ohio, 532-8606. 

532-8143 
Davis, Ralph E.. 1007 Front St.. Vanceburg, 796-4501, 796-2521 
Dawson. Alby, Box 78, Millersburg, 484-2219, 484-2026 
Day, Bill E., 1128 Hopi Trail. Frankfort. 227-7534 
Day, G. C, 933 Walnut Park Drive, Owensboro, 684-6014, 684- 

5285 
Day. Jack L., 606 Morehead St., Central City, 764-4700, 764- 

2272 
Deaton, Charles B., Box 283. Irvington, ' 547-4163, Ft. Knox, 4- 

6431 
DelConte, Art, 573 Enright Ave., Cincinnati. Ohio, 471-6440, 

751-1230 
Denham, Ronald, Box 251, Stanfc-ri".. ?65-7386, 365-2166 
Dennedy, T. Robert, 6083 Orangelawn, Cincinnati. Ohio, 922- 

8352i 922-2300 
Dennison, James E., 182-5 James David Court, Owensboro, 

684-3602. 684-7261 
Denton, Charles, 127 South Hubbard Lane, Henderson, 826- 

4020, 826-9533 
Derrickson, Richard, 621 Cardinal Lane, Lexington, 277-4557, 

254-71S6 
DeVary, Bill, 2929 Brigadoon. Lexington, 277-7237, 252-2250 

ext. 2739 
Diuguid. Ray. 2607 Thomas. Hopkinsville, 885-3131, 886-3389 
Dial, Charles R.. 3300 Monel Ave., Huntington, W. Va. 
Dickson, Tom, 1134 Hogan, Portsmouth, Ohio, 363-4488 
Dierolf, William H.. Jr., OACS C & E. HQS MAAG. APO 

96263, Sar. Francisco. Calif. 
Dills, Bernie, 6516 Craigland, Cincinnati, Ohio, 231-4027, 421- 

6700 ext. 591 
Disken, Jim, 2930 Vine St.. Cincinnati, Ohio, 281-0136, 281-9264 
Divine. Wayne L.. 400 West 4th St., Central City, 754-2783, 

754-2272 
Dixon, Billy Maurice, 511 Ballard, Richmond, 623-4237, 623-1842 
Dobson, Kenneth. Route No. 3. Paducah, 442-0778. 443-4634 
Dockery, Donald. 3631 Rodenberg Ave.. Evansville, Ind. 
Doctor, Richard P., Naval Ord. Plant. Louisville, 368-0717, 

361-2641 ext. 619 
Dodson, G. Winston, 321 Jesselin, Lexington. 277-2698, 252-2250 
Dorsey, James, 4062 Vinedale Ave.. Cincinnati, Ohio, 471-8050 
Dotson, John B., 504 McKinney Rd., Vincennes, Ind., 882-8095 
Douthwaite. Donald D., 6616 Merwin Ave., Cincinnati, Ohio. 

661-0916. 662-1)891 
Downey. James B., 2128 Oleander Drive, Lexington, 277-9122 
Downs, Joseph W., 829 Bartley, Bardstown. 348-5123 
Drake, Richard R.. 72 Donnelly Dr.. Ft. Thomas. 441-4235 
Driskell. Earl. Jr.. 3311 Moulton Lane. Louisville, 459-4855, 

366-0390 



Driver, Bobby. Route No. 4, Glasgow. 427-2537, 453-2722 
Duff, Earl. 218 Lyttle Blvd., Hazard, 436-2725. 436-3136 
Duggins. Michael, 515 Erianger Rd., Erlanger, 341-0786 
Dunaway. Adrian, 246 Cumberland Ave., Barbourville, 546- 

4601. 646-4049 
Duncan, Robert Ray, 1008 Earl St., Henderson, 826-8239, 827- 

1393 
Duncil, Charles W., Beattyville, 676-4274 
Durbin, Hade, Jr., 219 N. Mantle, Elizabethtown, 765-7893, 

765-5237 
Durbin, Roy. 2911 Dale Ann Drive. Louisville, 452-1730, 587- 

1121 ext. 486 
Durden, John R., 302 E. Parkview Drive. Hopkinsville, 886-7186 
Duvall. Thomas Jay. Sr., 4123 Craig Ave., Louisvlile, 368-1064, 

637-1421 ext. 227 
Dyer, Joe R., Route No. 6. Murray. 436-2336 
Byrd. Dennis Wayne. 214 Mackey Ave.. Williarasburg, 4667 
Eades. Jim, South Carrollton, 754-2689 

Eary, Edward B.. Jr., 309 Glendale Ave., Lexington, 252-6568 
Edwards, Don A.. Box 317. Sebree, 835-7537, Murray 753-3300 
Ernest, S. Edwards, Jr.. 8235 39th St.. Louisville, 774-5496, 

584-0201 
Elder, Charles J., Jr., 11807 Mahogany Drive, Valley Station, 

937-2683, 366-5111 
Eldridge. James R.. Haldeman. 784-7677, 784-5792 
Ellington, James E., 3521 Cherry Tree Lane, Erlanger, 341- 

8107. 581-7946 
Elliott, Carroll L., 307 College St., Elizabethtown, 765-4007, 

765-6118 
Ellis, Johnny, Box 331, Prestonsburg, 6-2751, 6-3080 
Elrod, William Turner, 332 Sumpter Ave., Bowling Green, 

2-5110 
Emery. George A., 234 Clay. New Albany, Ind., 944-5257. BU 

3-3511 ext. 242 
Embry, Randy B., 1636 Daviess, Owensboro, 683-0349, Lexing- 
ton 278-5214 
England, Larry A., Route No. 2, Murray, 753-6153, 753-9116 
Engle, Orville. 128 Oak St.. Pineville. 7-2916 
Ernst, Edward R., P. O. Box 75040, Cincinnati, Ohio, 689-7181 
Evans, Clark C. Martha, 662-3776 

Evans. Elmo Wade. Route No. 1, Box 8, Tyner. 364-2517 
Everett. Billy N.. Fairview. 886-4749, 277-6281 
Farish, Merlin J.. 1754 Genung Drive, New Albany, Ind., 

945-0863, Brandenburg, Ky., 422-2101 ext. 252 
Farley, Jimmy, W. Jefferson. Berea. 287-6101 (Bus.) 
Farmer. Billie L., 203 South 16th St.. Mayfield 247-7189, 

247-1941 
Feher, Al, 142 Main St., Lynch, 848-2547, 848-5431 
Feix. Al, Green River Road, Henderson. 826-3331. 826-9056 
Fenton, Don J., 4890 Oaklawn Drive, Cincinnati, Ohio. 271- 

3792. 751-4344 
Ferrell. Doc T.. 159 Edgemoor, Lexington, 277-4273. 254-0301 
Ferrell, Jimmy, 236 Kelly Drive, Glasgow, 651-8460, 651-3661 
Fey, Allen, 123 Garden Way, Ft. Thomas, 441-6288. 562-5461 
Finley. Albert R., 114 Millbrooke Drive. Hopkinsville, 886-4108. 

886-8335 
Finley. Sam, 4609 E. Manslick Rd., Louisville, 964-1652, 895- 

0621 
Fish, Leland G., 826 Oak Hill. Lexington. 255-7166. 264-7080 

ext. 7535 
Fiske. Charles N., 3521 Fountain Dr.. Louisville, 451-8615. 

584-4221 
Flinchum. Lloyd Paul. Apt. 120 Brockton, Richmond 
Flowers. Randal B.. Cecilia, 862-4275. 76.5-2191 
Floyd, Richard. Route No. 1, Bagdad. 747-8751, 747-8751 
Flynn. Bobby. 428 McKenna Court. Lexington. 299-6902. 255- 

5188 
Foster. Berryman E.. 927 Waverly Drive. Lexington. 255-7783, 

254-7080 
Foster, Bob, Science Hill, 423-8683, Somerset 678-8161 
Foster, Eddie P., 466 Lima Drive, Lexington, 254-0978, 254- 

7319 
Foster, J. W.. 176 Market St., Lexington, 254-3670, 255-6666 

ext. 5253 
Fox, David G., Route No. 1. Box 86-A, Beattyville, 464-8536 

464-8536 
Fraley, Bill, 1604 Lee Drive, Henderson, VA 7-3232, VA 6-2601 
Francis. Fred L.. Route No. 1, Box 21-A. Bardstown, 348-3980 

348-3989 
Frazer, Tom Roe, 1002 Main, Sturgis, 333-4412, 333-4672 
Frazier. Glenn O., Piice. FR 7-2406 
Fraz'er. Roy D.. Price 

Fredericks. Rex. Route No. 2. Box 193. London. 864-2765 
Freese. Ollie. 5518 Mapleridge, Cincinnati. Ohio, 561-639E 

361-7010 
Freppon. Tom. 152 Bramble. Highland Heights, 781-0583, 421- 

1800 ext. 355 
Freter. Rex R.. 712 E. Lone Oak Rd., Paducah 
Frey, William R.. 224 East 10th St., Newport. 291-2268 
Fugate. E. Hugh. 329 Mockingbird Drive, Frankfort, 223-1340, 

564-3990 
Fuller. John R.. Jr., 4835 Epperson Rd., Paducah, 898-3115 

443-5626 
Fultz, Jack. Box 636, Olive Hill, 286-2303, 286-2481 
Gaither Gene, Box 103, Beaver Dam. 274-3885, 274-4905 
Galuk, Walter M., 3333 Central Ave. Ashland. 325-3305, 325 

1751 
Gab-en, Douglas E.. Apt. 311 College Court. Murray, 762-4437, 

762-4';37 



Pase Ten 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR OCTOBER, 1966 



Gardner. Gary, Route No. 3. Magnolia. 528-2947. 528-2947 
Gay. David W.. 115 Hill-N-Dale. Lancaster, 792-2870, 262-2250 

ext. 3801 
Gentile, Robert M., 3716 Briar Bridge Apt. 2, Louisville, 454- 

3696, 587-0557 
Gentry. Bobbv Gene, 3420 Candy Drive, Hopkinsville, 886- 

6219. 886-2515 
Gentry. Dale J.. 4945 Determine Lane, Louisville. 447-5981. 

585-5814 
Gettler. John F., 705 Providence Rd.. Lexington. 266-4801, 

252-5494 
Gibbs. Harold. 1263 Harmony Lane, Apt. 64, Jeffersonville, 

Ind. 
Gibson, Carl. Mousie, 946-3198 
Gilbert, Gerald L., Box 51, Elizabethtown, 765-6704, Ft. Knox, 

4-7719 
Gilbert, Lawrence, 113 Cardinal Court, Glasgow, 678-2874, 651- 

8761 
Gilbert. William Curtis, 702 Otter Circle Rd., Vine Grove, 

877-5316 
Gill, Joe. Harrodsburg, 734-2729 

Gilman, Ronald R., Route No. 1. Box 183, Delbarton. W. Va. 
Glazer. Marvin G.. Ill Thorne Heights. Eminence. 845-5134 
Coins, Edgar S.. Central Hall. Western Ky. Univ., Bowling 

Green, 745-2574 
Golden, Billy Joe, 436 E. Main. Lynch. 848-2512 
Goldey. William H., 463 Crestview Drive, Henderson, 827-3622, 

826-3932 
Goley, Jim, No. 6 Beemon Lane. Florence. 283-2009. 431-8336 
Goodall. Walter J.. 820 Park Ave.. Newport, 291-9470, 261-3133 
Goodin, Shirley G.. Box 143, Pineville, 337-3982, 337-2435 
Goodman, Jack, 514 Springdale Rd., Brandenburg, 422-2072. 

422-3363 
Goodman. Jimmy Richard. Box 404. Pikeville, 437-7496 
Gordon. Levi, 108 Eminence Terrace, Eminence, 845-5865, 

845-6611 
Gour. Bob, 218 South Lee, Bowling Green, 843-9582, 745-4293 
Grace, H. E.. Jr.. Middlesboro. 248-1290, Pineville. 337-3320 
Granger. Michael. 321 Highway. Ludlow. 261-0584, 261-8968 
Graves, Kenneth J.. Route No. 2. Mt. Olivet. 724-2441, 724-2861 
Gray, Raymond, Box 87, Livermore. 278-2615 
Griffis, Estil, Jr.. Route No. 7, Athens-Boonesboro Rd., Lex- 
ington, 266-1932 
Griffith. Rudolph, Jr.. Prestonsburg. TU 6-3036 (Bus.) 
Grigsby. Pete. Jr.. McDowell. 377-2356, 377-6202 
Grunkemeyer, Michael L., 3138 Willis, Cincinnati, Ohio, 321- 

7619 
Guess, James E.. 949 McClure Ave.. Henderson. 826-2116, 521- 

6601 
Gustafson. Al, 248 Francis Bldg.. Louisville. 454-6151. 584-7655 
Hagan, Joe. 3000 Sherbrooke Rd., Louisville, 458-1325 
Hagen, William R., 2595 Highgrove Court, Cincinnati, Ohio, 

522-0647, 562-5293 
Hall, Elvis, McHenry 

Hall, Mac, Route No. 1. Box 187. Williamson. W. Va. 
Ham. Gerald. 1616 Oliver. Bowling Green. 842-5396. 842-5396 
Ham. Ronald. 3008 Broadway. Evansville, Ind., 422-3371, 424- 

2434 
Hamblin, Anthony, Buckhorn, 398-7486 
Hamilton, Walter F., 3404 Bryan Way, Louisville, 459-5432, 

587-1121 ext. 396 
Hamm, Harold D., Route No. 6, Frankfort, 227-9800 
Hammock, Don L., 1512 Audubon Parkway, Louisville, 635- 

7111, 583-5604 
Hammons. Norman, Route No. 4. Hopkinsville, 885-5914, 886- 

3311 
Hardin, Carl Ray, Kennady Lane, Box 89, Lebanon, 692-2784, 

692-3109 
Hardin, Jack H., 1105 'B' Street, Ceredo, W. Va. 
Harmon, Glenn G., 232 Madison Ave., Danville, 236-6748, 236- 

3131 
Harp, Kenneth R., 3522 Brookview Drive, Lexington, 277-8743 
Harper, Bruce D., 1625 Alexandria, Lexington, 278-4615, 252- 

2250 ext. 3416 
Harper, Randall H.. 11806 Dearing Woods Drive, Valley Sta- 
tion. 937-5319, 772-3661 ext 492 
Harris, Billy, Box 97, Cleaton, 754-4410, 754-1630 
Harris, Larry R., Route No, 4, Nancy, 871-3221 
Harris, Wayne. Route No. 2, Somerset, 679-2184. 678-5081 
Harrison. John L., Webster Ext., Cynthiana, 234-3333, 234-5721 
Hartman, Robei-t E., 3647 Concerto Drive, Cincinnati, Ohio, 

771-8914. 891-7133 
Hatfield, Cecil E., Box 2676, Williamson, W. Va, 
Hatfield, Dennis, 1610 May St., Covington, 431-4234, 431-3207 
Hayden, Samuel J., Fancy Farm, 623-8414, 623-4987 
Hazelwood. Howard, 29 Burk, Florence, 282-1258, 282-2191 
Heath, Robert T.. Hardinsburg. 756-2387 
Hedge. David William. 321 Mockingbird Drive. Jeffersonville, 

Ind., 283-3962, 283-3155 
Heinichen, Carl, 1941 Schollenberger Ave., Cincinnati, Ohio, 

931-7997 
Heitlinger, Lester, 3647 Johnston Way, Louisville. 459-3699, 

895-3401 ext. 288 
Heldman. Dr. John, Jr,, 140 Seneca Trail, Louisville, 363-2181, 

636-4463 
Helton, Lewis W., Flat Lick, 542-2471, 546-3920 
Hendricks, Dudley, 403 Sycamore St., Carrollton. 732-5694 
Hensley. Spencer. 814 Madison. Paducah. 442-2395 
Hewitt, R. T., 813 Sharpe. Murray, 753-5435, 762-4391 



Hicks, Floyd E., 43 New Uri, Florence, 283-1207 

Hicks, Lloyd, 6253 Springmeyer, Cincinnati, Ohio, 662-5103, 

961-7820 ext. 216 
Hill, Earl F.. Route No. 6, Box 141, London, 864-2521. 864-2128 
Hill. Ernest L., Box 762. Ashland, 324-2482. 324-2144 
Hills, Marshall L., Route No. 1, Box 433, Morning View, 

356-9687, 366-5050 
Hinton. Henry E., 1210 Witawanga, Lyndon, 425-7627 
Hinton, Noah Spears, Jr.. Box 981, Pikeville, 437-6144, 639- 

2832 
Hisle, Charlie R., 21 Locust Drive, Winchester, 744-5764, Le.x- 

ington 299-1221 ext. 5202 
Hitt, Billy D.. Route No. 2, Mayslick, 763-2608, 564-9166 
Hofstetter, Joe, Box 1815, Williamson, W. Va. 
Holbrook, Ray, Box 326, Irvine, 723-2951. 723-4200 
Holeman, Bill R., 103 Locust St., Manchester, o98-2999 
Holland David W., Box 43, Water Valley, 355-2640, 472-3626 
Hollingsworth, Ralph D., 206 8th Ave. East, Springfield, 

Tenn.. 384-6467, 384-5700 
Hollowell, Mojo, 1109 Atkinson, Henderson, VA 7-9502 
Holt, Robert E., 3303 Southgate Drive, Hopkinsville, 885-3405, 

886-1207 
Holthouser, Ora L.. 614 West South Heights, Louisville, 366- 

4724, 778-2731 ext. 445 
Hook. B. B.. Jr., Keenland Drive, Murray, 763-2387, 924-5677 
Hook, Don. Cunningham. 642-2891 
Hoppel-, Marion, Box 191, Munfordville, 524-5473 
Horn, Everett, Jr., Inez, 298-3423, 298-3217 
Horsman, Bill, 512 Iowa, Louisville, 637-1201, 583-7621 
Howard. Bruce L., Keeton Heights, West Liberty, 743-3803, 

743-3706 
Howard, Carl, Route No. 1, Lynnville, 382-2176, 247-6742 
Howard, Robert E., 4302 Naomi Drive, Louisville, 969-7619, 

583-4606 
Hubbard, David, 235 Sycamore, Jackson, 666-5435 
Hubbs, Cletus L., Jr., 303 West 15th St., Hopkinsville, 885- 

8678, 886-3384 
Huber. Jerry. 404 Scott St., Covington, 681-0897, 431-5723 
Hudnall, William E., 13 Woodmont Court, Paris, 987-1641, 

987-4700 
Hudson, Oscar, Box 32. Sassafras, 436-3858, 436-2141 
Hughes, Paul P.. 520 Riverside Drive, Prestonsburg, 886-6771, 

886-2170 
Huiet, Fred, 7241 Longfield Drive, Madeira, Ohio, 661-9239, 

561-9903 
Hume, Charles, 1909 Benson St., Bowling Green, 843-3730, 843- 

3730 
Hunt, Jack L., 935 Richardson, Clarksville, Tenn., 647-3037, 

647-6353 
Hurley, Kenneth E., Valentine Drive, Maysville, 564-5364, 564- 

6216 
Hurley, Robert, Box 244, Williamson, W. Va. 
Hurt, Thomas C, 220 Crab Orchard, Lancaster, 792-2312 (Bus.) 
Huston. Roderick J., 7492-C Pressler. Ft. Knox. 4-4487, 4-2942 
Hutchens, Jim, Box 103, Belfry, 237-1204, 353-7362 
Hutchinson, Jack T., Box 524, Martin, 285-3562 285-3011 
Huter, James J., 3643 Vermont Ave., Louisville, SP 6-0707, 

368-6519 
Hyland, F. D.. Box 465. South Webster. Ohio. 778-2401, 

466-4161 
Hyman, Alan David. 2340 Brookside Drive, Louisville, 464-3119 
Ingraham. Gary J , 9706 Lanesboro Way, Louisville, 425-5215, 

897-2816 
Ingram. William R., 5466-H Lowe, Ft. Knox, 4-3077, 4-7465 
Jacob, John J.. 3023 Hull Ave., Cincinnati, Ohio, 662-7728, 

621-4426 
Jacoby, Ben W., 127 Showalter Drive, Georgetown, 863-0508, 

252-8328 
Jahnigen, Robert E., 6675 Plantation Way, Cincinnati, Ohio, 

521-2424, 421-5700 Dist. No. 5 
James, Carl E., 204 Nob Hill Lane, Apt, No. 8, Louisville, 

896-0600, 687-0713 
James, Gene, 1507 South 3rd St., Ironton, Ohio, 532-6976, 

532-6224 
James, Jack L., Box 24, Valley Station, 937-3726 
Jenkins, Beryl, 2326 South 11th St., Ironton, Ohio. 532-6215 
Jent, Richard, 209 Legion Drive, Franklin, 686-8188, Le.xing- 

ton 252-2200 
Johns, Jerry, Box 308, Somerset, 678-5610 

Johnson, Harry B., 3024 Stanford Drive, Lexington, 277-2889 
Johnson, Leroy, 225 West 13th St., Bowling Green 
Johnson, Robert L.. 6 Jamestown Place, Clarksville, Tenn., 647- 

3982, 798-5493 
Johnson, Stan W., 2116 Ottawa Drive, Owensboro, 684-2157, 

683-2401 ext. 236 
Johnson, W. Bernard, Route No. 7, Box 286, Hopkinsville, 

269-2208, 886-5151 
Johnson, Walter, Box 203, Route No. 2, Grayson, 474-5908, 

474-5721 
Johnson, Willie Bob, 941 McClure Ave., Henderson, VA 7-3626 
Joiner, Russell D., Box 213, Smithland, 928-5563, 928-4731 
Jones, Boyer, 437 Jackson, Campbellsville, 466-6953, 466-8880 
Jones, Carson G., 713 North Main, Evansville, Ind., HA 2- 

3069. GR 4-7741 
Jones. Ervin. 1811 Oak St.. Hopkinsville. 886-1144. 439-5813 
Jones, Joe S., 203 Green St., Manchester, 598-3793. 598-2129 
Jones, John H., Route No. 5, Scottsville, 237-3959, 586-5141 
Jones, Paul. 314 Park Lane, Elizabethtown, 765-4502, Ft. Knox 

4-7019 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR SEPTEMBER, 1966 



Page Eleven 



684-1341 ext. 
Kelly, William G., 
Kessler, Robert H., 



Jones, Robert L., Jr., Green St., Box 316, Brandenburg, 

422-2977, 422-2101 
Jude, Harold D., Matewan. W. Va. 

Junker, Edwin G., 1045 W. Seymour. Cincinnati. Ohio, 821-4117 
Justice, Monty D., Jr., 8608 Perry Rd., Lyndon, 897-2693, 

774-6614 
Keatley, James H., Route No. 2, Delbarton, W. Va. 
Keeline, Joe, 1944 Monroe, Paducah, 443-2653, 442-2157 
Kelly, Charles R., 4206 Greenwell Lane, Louisville, 447-2665, 
204 

421-A -A" Street, Fort Knox, 4-7887, 4-1967 
6208 Fegenbush Lane. Louisville, 239-3884 
Kimmel, Jerry, Beechmont, 476-2666. 476-2656 
Kinder, Robert A., 626 Anniston Drive, Lexington, 299-6793, 

254-3746 
King, James A., 6000 Clarmar Rd., Jeffersontown, 239-8015, 

776-2466 
King, Raymond H., 216 Blossom Lane, Southgate, 441-6309, 

261-4357 
Kinney, Dale, 411 E. Pleasant St., Cynthiana, 234-1042 
Kirk. Floyd Charles, Main St., Box 334, Benham, 848-2039 
Kloufetos, Spiro J., 2702 Pioneer Rd., Louisville, 447-0373, 

582-6510 
Knight, Bill, 752 North 36th St., Paducah, 443-2775, 443-2775 
Koehne, Charles, 1826 Sherman, Norwood, Ohio. 631-1179 
Koharian, Bruce E., Hart Hall, Murray State University, 

Murray 
Kuhl, Lawrence, Houser Lane, London, 864-6235, 864-6240 
Lacer, Albert Ray, Box 51, Spottsville, VA 7-6815 
Ladd, Ronald E., Vivian Drive, Princeton, 365-6342, 365-5551 
Lally, James J., 1210 Ross, Cincinnati, Ohio, 471-3644 
Latkovski, Andy, 1235 Logan St., Louisville, 636-6720, 636-2526 
Laubheimer. Don T., 4616 Estate Drive, Louisville, 366-3880, 

683-8357 
Laugherty. Kenneth R., 2100 Peabody Lane, Louisville, 363- 

5409, 584-1211 
Lawson, Rondell, Garrett, 368-3631 
Layne, Bert, Box 13, Manton, BU 5-3012 

Leahy, Pat, 1819 Ratcliffe, Louisville, 776-6368, 587-1121 ext. 472 
liee, Robert L., 6810 Dartmoor Drive, Louisville, 425-3863, 896- 

2431 
Lee, Thomas J., c/o Social Security Adm., Box 592, Ashland, 

429-4180, 326-7666 
Lemaster, Douglas, 173 Henry St., West Liberty, 743-4344 
Leonard, Dale C, 2308 Hikes Lane, Louisville, 451-2308, 634- 

1581 ext. 457 
LeQuire. Harold M.. Horton Addition, Harlan, 573-1857. 573- 

5151 
Lillie, William W., 3018 Taylorsville Rd.. Louisville, 451-0562, 

582-2658 
Lindsey, Jack, Blackey, Whitesburg 633-7666 
Lile, Clyde F., 511 Henderson Drive, Hopkinsville, 885-3715, 

886-4463 
List, Frank A., Route No. 3, Owensboro, 683-6569. 684-5285 
Lloyd, Birt Leonard, 3610 Rear Brandon, Huntington, W. Va. 
IJoyd, David, 615 Elm St.. Ludlow, 681-1119, HI 1-7100 
Long, Bill, 209 Idlewylde Drive, Louisville, 896-8731, 582-2613 
Logue, Ronald G., 514 Maple Ave., Danville, 236-3680, 236-3905 
Box 73, Baskett, VA 7-6000, 633-6421 

664 Lombardy Drive, Lexington, 299-7226. 



Long. James E. 
Long. Robert F. 

252-2626 
Longo. Richard 

266-3328 
Loop, Wilbur H. 

684-2165 
Loudy, Kenneth, 
Lovely, Johnnie 



Locust Drive, Charleston, Ind., 256-2132, 
Jr., 1906 Hoke Road, Louisville, AN 7-5010. 
675-4278 



Box 6. Slemp, 676-4278. 
Elsie, 9-2627 
liOwe. Gene, Route No. 6, Box 28. London. 864-5724, 864-2207 
Lowe, James David, Jr., 119 Valleybrook Rd., Bowling Green, 

842-3734, 842-6611 
Lucas, Jack G., 612 Elsmere Park, Lexington, 255-1067, 265- 

3880 ext. 318 
Luebbers, Leonard, 1147 Woody Lane, Cincinnati, Ohio, 471- 

3122. 321-6777 
Lurker. Mel, 1651 Olive, Evansville, Ind., 426-3929, 423-5876 
Lusby, George, 615 Pueblo Trail, Georgetown, 863-1440, 863-1770 
Lytle. William Price. 133 Zandale. Lexington, 277-2881, 277- 

2881 
McAllister, Jack. 2706 McKinley. Cincinnati, Ohio, 662-5288. 
241-3980 

Liberty. 787-6525. 787-6571 
1713 East 9th St.. Hopkinsville. 886-1948. 



MeAnelly, David F 
McCargo, Frank J. 

886-9400 
McConnell, Michael 



. Joseph,' 115 South 39th St., Louisville. 

776-9721, 776-6431 
McCowan, Connell, Route No. 1, Box 251. Corbin, 628-4932 
McCoy, Hayse, Box 265. Inez, 298-3417, 298-3417 
McCoy, James W., 237 Kenton St., Bromley, 261-3368 
McDannold, Lewis H., Ridgewood Drive, Versailles, 873-6134, 

266-1161 
McGehee, Gordon, 733 Forest Lane, Covington, 261-6880 
McGlasson, Galen, 212 North Bend Road, Hebron, 689-7330. 

689-7342 
McGlone, Maurice B., 421 Bobbins Ave.. Falmouth. 654-8322. 

Cynthiana 234-3763 
McGuire. Herbert. 830 Boyd, Danville, 236-6645, 236-5211 
McKinney, Adelle F., 7829-B Estrada Ave.. Ft Knox, 4-6860, 

4-4558 
McLane, Albert, Route No. 1, Glendale, 862-4579, 862-3924 



McLean, Gordon. Cody, 642-3326 

McMillian, Terry Lynn, 2535 Avon, So. Ft. Mitchell. 341-1028, 

721-4477 
McMillin. Larry L.. Box 178. Crestwood, 241-4731, 241-4468 
McNamee, Jack, 3616 Muddycreek, Cincinnati, Ohio, 922-6207 
McNeely, Albert T., 329 Wilson Ave., Box 535, Morehead, 784- 

6814, 784-7528 
McPike, Ray S.. Jr., 407 Theatre Bldg., 629 So. 4th St., Lou- 
isville, 451-3832, 586-2832 
Madden, McElroy, 463 Lindberg Drive, Lexington, 265-6604, 

255-6504 
Madon, Robert L., 314 Catalpa, Pineville, 337-2135, 337-3093 
Mahan, Carle, 29 Manor Drive, Winchester, 744-4560, Lex- 
ington 262-0290 
Mahanes, Tom, 240 Lowry Lane, Lexington, 278-1826, 277-2748 
Mahone, Lossie, Route No. 1, Box 163, Williamson, W. Va. 
Marshall, Glenn Roger, Waco, 369-6962 

Marshall. Tivis N., 901 French Broad St.. Ashland. 324-0015 
Martin, Carl T.. Box 13, McKinney, 346-3606 
Martin, Charlie, Box 63, Sharpsburg, 247-2141, 247-2611 
Martin, Sam, Jr., McDowell, 377-2453 
Mattingly, Bernard, Cloverport, 788-6674 
Mauney, Bill, 102 Crab Orchard St., Somerset, 679-2977, 679- 

1574 
May, Charles E.. North Lake Drive, Box 185. Prestonsburg, 

886-3414, 886-8661 
May, E. B., Box No. 185, Prestonsburg, 886-3414, 886-8661 
Mayer, John P.. Box 27, Frenchburg 
Mayfield, Clarkie, 124 Sunset Drive, Hodgenville, 358-4326, 

368-3196 
Maynard, Jack. Chattaroy, W. Va. 

Maynard, Joe E., 809 Nesbitt Drive, Madison, Tenn., 865-2438 
Maynard, John W., Delbarton, W. Va. 

Maynard, Kenneth R.. Box 512, Pikeville, 432-1354, 432-1461 
Maynard, Lonnie, Freeburn, 466-3563 

Maynard, Raymond L., Box 87, Warfield, 395-5222, 298-3601 
Meade, Foster. Box 59, Irvine, 723-2586, 723-3360 
Meek, Walter E., Williamsport, 789-6697, 789-3411 
Melear, Leland, 7306 Supremus Drive, Louisville, 935-3654 
Melmige, James, Jr.. Box 2117, Williamson, W. Va. 
Melton, Robert E., 1406 Young St., Henderson, 7-3067. 7-1838 
Meredith, Denny E., Jr., 2644 Oregon Ave., Louisville, 776- 

2855. JU 4-0221 
Meredith, Thomas Carter, 203 East 23rd St., Owensboro, MU 

3-3910 
Messerian, Nishan, 175 East 3rd Ave.. Williamson. W. Va. 
Metzger. Donald R.. 9312 Cloverwood Lane, Fern Creek. 239- 

9813, 454-7511 ext. 4624 
Meyer, Bud, 6319 Lilibet Court. Cincinnati, Ohio, 922-3459, 

381-4300 
Mickey, Elbert W.. Box 2471. Williamson. W. Va. 
Middleton, Johnny, 209 Leimaur Drive, Richmond, 623-1682 
Mielcarek, Chester N., 718 Cindy Blair Way, Lexington, 278- 

1534. 266-3135 
Milbern, Dan, 1049 Patricia Lane. Lexington. 256-5438. 252- 

2250 ext. 2603 
Miles. Robert J., 1113 W. Mill Road, Evansville, Ind.. 423- 

7419, 423-7419 
Miller, Bob, 197 Holiday Lane, Ft Thomas, 441-6886, 635-2191 
Miller, Claude O., 704y„ Tenth Ave., Huntington, W. Va. 
Miller, Everett J., 4108 Riverview, Middletown. Ohio, 423- 

9978. 425-3276 
Miller, Ferrel, Route No. 1, Murray, 435-5271, 436-6271 
Miller. James C, 1225 12th St., Tell City. Ind.. 547-4690, 647- 

2311 
Miller. John D., 218 Alfred Drive, Clarksville, Tenn. 
Miller, Rex J.. 2711 Greenway, Ashland, 324-5023, 325-4706 

L., 26 Pine Hill, Highland Heights, 781-0619, 



L., Post Office, St. Mary, 692-4605, 692-4266 
Plantation Way, Cincinnati, Ohio, 621-6682, 



Miller, Victor 

431-9047 
Mills, William 
Monahan, Ed, 

681-8300 
Montgomery, Chester M., 1808 East 19th St., Bowling Green, 

842-3214 
Mooneyhan, James H., 810 Henry St., Franklin, 586-4989, 686- 

4451 
Moore, James E., Larkslane 

Moore, Robert, 441 Forest, Erlanger, 341-6837. 563-1100 
Morgan, M. Earl. 3600 Kings Highway, Louisville, 451-0171 
Morse, Richard K., 163 N. Deepwood Dr., Radcliff, 361-3748, 

Fort Knox 4-4454 
Moser, Rudy Clay, 504 Bluff St.. Providence, 667-2997 
Munk, McKee, Henryville, Ind., 796-6662 
Murrell, Allen Leslie, 1804 Woodhurst, Bowling Green 842- 

1286 
Napier. Wallace R.. Jr.. Mary Alice. 573-3721 
Neal, Gene, 3648 SR 132, Route No. 1, Batavia, Ohio, 763-5908, 

242-6161 
Nevil, Vernon E., 7748C 70th TK Bn. Rd. Ft. Knox, 4-5604. 

4-8630 
Newman, Bill, 2535 Ritchie, Portsmouth. Ohio, 353-6267 
Newman, Larry, 322 West Sun St., Morehead, 784-4721 
Norris, Kibbys, Aberdeen 
Nixon, Jim, 2713 Canton, Hopkinsville. 886-2641. Ft. Camn- 

bel] 798-4897 
Noel, John, 20004 Harrison Ave.. Cincinnati. Ohio. 661-8613. 

231-6685 

Norwood, Donald V., Route No. 6, Strawberry, Franklin 
586-6119, 686-4636 



Page Twelve 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR OCTOBER, 1966 



Does Your Present Student 
Policy Cover Your Athletes? 
We Can Solve Your Problem, 



W. E. KINGSLEY 



*7<4e fCi4^(f(IUfi Qo-4nfLa4Uf^ general agent 

CHARLES C. PRICE 



121-123 LAFAYETTE AVENUE 
P. O. BOX 7100 



J. E. McCREARY, Mgr. 

Life Department 

LEXINGTON, KY. 



PHONE 255-0837 



Norwood. Thomas R-. 811 Henry St., Franklin, 586-3614, 586- 

3541 
Oldham, John H., Route No. 1, Box 254-E, Prospect, 228-1698 
Omdahl, John LeRoy, 1556 Alexandria Drive No. 2A, Lexing- 
ton, 278-2646. 255-6860 ext. 2207 
Omer, Billy W.. 250 Reed. Madisonville, 821-2833 
Omer, Harold G., 150 N. Crestmoor, Louisville, 896-4170, 774- 

6386 
O'Nan, Norman. Route No. 4, Henderson, 7-3968, 6-9578 
Orem. Dale Linton, 409 Chippewa Drive, Jeffersonville, Ind., 

BU 3-8225, Louisville 587-1161 ext. 441 
Osborne, Larry Joe. 308 Scott Ave., Pikeville, 437-6649 
Osborne. Virgil F., Jonancy, 639-2740 

Overton, Frank, Jr.. Box 36. Four Mile. 337-2026, 337-2435 
Owens, Bruce E., Box 917, Harlan. 573-1686. 573-1661 
Owens. K. L., Jr.. 602 18th St.. Corbin, 628-4426. 528-2330 
Pace, Donald, 2023 Deauville. Lexington, 252-6535, 255-0398 
Pack. Donald. Fleming. 855-7708, 85.5-7443 

Padgett. R. K., 202 College St., Somerset. 678-5485. 678-4141 
Page, Richard H., 521 South 8th St., Mayfield, 247-7983, 247- 

2882 
Parker, Francis V., 208 Rosemont, Providence, 667-2224 
Parker, Joseph H., 107 Wellington, Hickman. 236-2163. 236-2736 
Parrish. Dale C, No. 11 Peratt Hall, Morehead St., Univ., 

Morehead 
Parrish, Willie, 30 Wall St., Winchester. 744-2903. 744-5658 
Parrott, Lanny L., 202 Bibb St., Box 174, Campbellsville, 465- 

8741. 465-8741 
Partin. Billy Ray, Box 41, Four Mile, 337-3185 
Paulin, Al, 538 Franklin. Tell City, Ind.. 547-3323. 547-3323 
Peck, Harold, 619 W. Delaware, Evansville, Ind., 422-0142, 425- 

7244 
Pedigo. Albert M., 610 Gheens Ave., Louisville, 368-1283, 368- 

6505 
Peecher, W. Lloyd, 5928 Woodland, Sciotoville. Ohio, 776-9075 
Peeno, Harry R., 124 Morris Rd., Lookout Heights. Coving- 
ton. ED 1-1981 
PeHrey. Charles E., 2004 Dalton. Ashland. 324-1240 
Pelphrey, Jack, Box 54, Paintsville, 789-4206 
Pemberton, Ray S., 500 Van Voast. Bellevue. 581-9845 
Pence. Charles E., Route No. 3. Box 211, Grayson, 474-5653, 

474-5653 
Pence, William Jerry. Summitt. 862-4517 
Penix. Hobert Ferrell. Carter Hall. Apt. 2. Morehead 
Penner. Merritt D., Jr., Route No. 4. Box 739, Manchester, 

598-3711 
Pepper, Jerry L., Route No. 1, Oak Grove, 439-3048 
Perkins. James E., Route No. 6, Glasgow, 678-2718, 678-2718 
Perkins, James Melvin, Route No. 5, Glasgow, 678-2267 



Perry. E. James, Route No. 6. Paducah, 444-5764, 444-5701 
Phelps, Ralph. Box 84, Ashland, 836-3670, 324-1155 ext. 258 
Phelps. Ray. Box 533. Russell. 836-6646, 928-6633 
Phipps. James M., 1333 South 3rd, Louisville, 635-6559, BU 3- 

3551 
Pietrowski, Paul, 108 Bishop, Corbin, 528-6391 
Pike. Robert F.. Box 246, Carrollton, 732-4309, 564-3974 
Ping. Denton, Route No. 3, Eubank. 379-3221, 379-3221 
Plate, Arthur C, 6505 Crestview. Cincinnati, Ohio, 631-6161. 

241-4114 
Points, Charles. 414 Swan Circle, Erlanger, 341-9740. 341-8750 
Poppas, Nickolas, 1996 Republic, Dayton, Ohio. 277-2323 
Porco, Kenneth J., 3924 Layside Drive, Louisville, 459-3455, 

458-3281 
Prater. Rondel R., Hueysville. 358-4039 
Prather, Wilbur E., 1512 Berry Blvd., Louisville. 363-2908, 

585-2169 
Preece. John C. Box 355, Kermit, W. Va. 
Presnell, Tommy, 210 Howard Court, Versailles, 873-4895 
Prewitt. Shelby. WEZJ Radio Station, Williamsburg, 528-6436, 

6125 
Price. James E., Liberty, 787-7296. 787-6212 
Prichard, Glenn W.. Warfield. 393-3250, 393-3200 
Profitt. Lawrence K.. Route No. 6. Winchester. 744-3409 
Pryor. C. William, 8939 Applewood, Cincinnati, Ohio, 791-0073. 

731-2012 
Purcell, Billy D., 110 Hopewell, Paris. 987-4231, 252-2250 
Rader, J. Douglas. Route No. 2, Box 358, MoKee. 287-2447 
Radjunas. Eddie, 1644 Elliott Ave.. Ashland, 324-1896, 324-1896 
Radjunas, Stan. 1644 Elliott Ave., Ashland, 324-1896 
Rainey, James C, Hampton Manor, Winchester, 744-4028 
Rakel. Bob 2625 Topeka St., Cincinnati, Ohio, 825-8135, 531- 

7625 
Ramey. Herbert D.. Farmers, 784-4724 
Rardin, James W., 252 Clay Ave., Lexington 
Rasso, Steven J., 4443 Pinecroft Drive, Cincinnati. Ohio. 

481-1488. 431-5351 
Ravenscraft, Glendon A., 39 Newman Ave., Ft. Thomas, 441- 

5991 
Rawlings. Harold. 1382 N. W. Wingard, Radcliff, 351-3249. 

Ft. Knox 4-3620 
Reed, Charles R., 102 Elizabeth, Versailles, 873-4213, Lex- 
ington. 252-1122 
Reed, Gordon, 22 Riverside Parkway. Ft. Thomas, 441-4946. 

Cincinnati, Ohio, 631-5750 



Rees, Gayle H., 1613 Atlanta Drive, Lexington, 299-7316, 
1221 ext. 5231 

(Continued in November Issue) 



299- 



Sutclif f e nam The 
Siiveaters and Jackets 

in Stock for Immediate Delivery 
With Lettering Service, 10-Day Delivery 




ORDER 
NOW 



ORDER FOOTBALL 

HONOR SWEATERS 

NOW SO THEY'LL 

BE READY FOR YOUR 

PLAYERS THE MOMENT 

THE SEASON IS OVER. 




SPECIAL SCHOOL PRICES ARE SHOWN | 



V-NECK SLIP-OVER SWEATERS 

No. 1030 — A Sand Knlt+Ing Mills sweater of 100% wool 
in heavy baby shaker weave. Stock colors — Black, White, 
Royal, Scarlet, Purple, Kelly, Old Gold, Cardinal; 
each $ 1 3.95 

No. 530-CL — Another Sand sweater in solid white. 
Choice of cheerleaders, bands, etc. Also very popular 
as athletic awards. White only; each $10.95 

No. 30V— 100% wool. Stock colors— Black, Old Gold, 
Royal, Scarlet, Purple, Maroon, Kelly, Light Gold, 
Burnt Orange; each $11.85 



REVERSIBLE HONOR JACKETS 
Write us for our Catalog with Special School Prices 



BUTTON FRONT COAT STYLE SWEATERS 

No. 1020 — A Sand product of heavy baby shaker weave. 
100/4 pure wool yarn. Demanded by schools who want 
the best. Stock colors— Black, White, Royal, Scarlet, 
Purple, Cardinal, Kelly, Old Gold; each $14.95 

No. 1520 — A companion sweater to the 530-CL. Made 
by Sand in solid white coat style in medium weight. 
Sizes 34 to 46. White only. Colors are special order. 
This sweater is very popular with cheerleaders and 
bands. Each _ $ 1 3.95 

No. 2620J — A Sand Knitting Mills Heavy Jersey Weave. 
Button Front Coat Sweater — 100% pure wool and one 
of our most popular honor garments. Stock colors — 
Royal, Kelly, Scarlet, Black, Old Gold, White, Maroon, 
Purple; each $12.40 



WE OPERATE OUR OWN LETTERING DEPARTMENT 

LETTERING: 6" chenille letters, each $1.45; 8" letters $2.15; chenille bars, 50c each; 
chenille chevrons, 50c; name plates, 15c each. Delivery of woven service stripes 
in sleeves cost 35c additional per sweater and require three weeks for delivery. 



The SUTCLIFFE CO 

INCORPORATED 

LOUISVILLE L KENTUCKY 



HUNT'S ATHLETIC GOODS CO., INC. 

Mayfield, Kentucky 
CH 7-1941 CH 7-1942 



Whether your order is for a few special items, or for outfitting a complete 
team, we give undivided and personal attention to every order that comes 
to our store. We have the most complete stock for team equipment in the 
South. 

We are distributors for the VERY BEST MANUFACTURERS of athletic 
goods such as: 



SECO 

MacGREGOR 

SPALDING 

KING^O'SHEA 

RIDDELL 

VOIT 

FAIR PLAY 

HILLERICH & BRADSBY 

SPANJIAN 



CONVERSE 

E. R. MOORE CO. 

BIKE 

CRAMER 

WIGWAM 

NELSON 

JOHNSON & JOHNSON 

SOUTHERN 

LYON METAL 



We try to miake our SERVICE match the quality of the items we sell, 
and are now in position to guarantee overnight delivery to any place in 
the State of Kentucky. Furthermore, each and every item we sell is fully 
guaranteed. 



If you would like to see our salesman for football or basketball equipment, 
call Mayfield 247-1941 collect. 



Roy Boyd, Jim Mitchell, Billy Farmer and C. A. Byrn are always glad to 
help you in Mayfield. Call collect, or come by and let them help you with 
your needs. 



HUNTS ATHLETIC GOODS, Inc. 

CH 7-1941 — PHONES — CH 7-1942 
MAYFIELD, KENTUCKY 

Wp Ship The DaV Vou BuV 






Hiqhkhool Athlete 

K. H. S. A. A. AREA BASKETBALL REPRESENTATIVES 




(Left to Right) Front Row: Jerry Kimmel, Beechmont; Bob Gour, Bowling Green; Roy Winchester, 
Bethlehem; School Director Charlie Vettiner. Louisville; Bob Foster, Science Hill; Charlie Irwin, Hop- 
kinsville. Second Row : Howard Gardner, Elizabethtown ; Rex Alexander, Murray ; Claude Ricketts, 
Louisville; Hubert Louden, Louisville; Bill Wise. Lexington; Kenneth Loudy, Slemp. Third Row: Walt 
Green, Middlesboro; Jack Wise, Georgetown; E. B. May, Jr., Prestonsburg; Ernie Chattin, Ashland; Bob 
Miller. Ft. Thomas; Roy Settle, Owensboro. 



Official Organ of tiie 

KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION 

November, 1966 



^IgUjJS 



FILMS 



The films listed below are In the Film Library of 
the University of Kentucky College of Education. The 
Code letters "e, j, s, c, a" refer to elementary, junior 
high, senior high, college and adult audiences who 
may enjoy the particular film listed. The rental prices 
shown do not apply to schools which use one of the 
special subscription service plans offered by the Bu- 
reau of Audio-Visual Material. 

Basketball 

ASHL-WD VS. ST. XAVIER (1962 K.H.S. BASKET- 
, BALL TOURNAMENT FINALS), e-j-s-c-a, 3 reels, 

silent, $1.00 

The Ashland Tomcats gave a valiant performance in 
trying to capture their second consecutive champion- 
ship but the Tigers of St. Xavier were the winners in 
the final game by 62-58. The Tigers were led by Mike 
Silliman and the Tomcats by Larry Conley. 
BALL HANDLING IN BASKETBALL, j-s-c, 1 reel, 

$1.50 

Teaches fundamentals of basketball handling in- 
cluding stance, grip, control, adjustment, before shoot- 
ing, catching the ball, and other points. Presents game 
shois, using special photographic techniques to illus- 
trate principles. 
BASKETBALL BY RUPP, j-s-c-a, 2 reels, $2.50 

Anmiated play diagrams, slow motion photography, 
and action shot are combined in this new film pre- 
pared under the personal direction of Mr. Rupp es- 
pecially for coaching use. Among the drills and plays 
covered in this film are: pivot man's slide into the 
basket; Play No. 6, the famous Kentucky Basket 
Maker; legal screening; penetration zone defense; and 
the Kentucky fast break. 
BASKETBALL FOR MILLIONS, j-s-c-a, 3 reels, $1.00 

This is the film for 1958-59, produced by the Official 
Sports Film Service under the sanction of the National 
Federation. A fantastic dream sequence where im- 
possible and nightmarish situations can and do arise is 
the continuity thread used throughout the film to de- 
pict: Accepted officiating procedures— problems created 
by double fouls and false double fouls— tricky situations 
connected with front and back court— jump ball infrac- 
tions and procedures — little understood distinction be- 
tween player and team control — and a panorama of 
basic rule fundamentals. 
BASKETBALL FUNDAMENTALS — INDIVIDUAL 

TECHNIQUES, j-s-c-a. H^ reels, $2.50 

Branch McCracken, Indiana University basketball 
coach, used his team to demonstrate the fundamentals 
of basketball. Slow motion photography is used to 
break the various court techniques down into easily 
grasped essentials. 
BASKETBALL KENTUCKY STYLE, j-s-c-a, 2 reels, 

$2.50 (in state), $5.00 (out of state) 

This is the revised edition of the film "Basketball 
By Rupp" prepared under the personal direction of 
Mr. Rupp especially for coaching use. 
BASKETBALL STRATEGY FOR GIRLS, j-s-c-a, 1 

reel, $1.50 

The basic strategy of offense play (fakes, rolls, 
cutting, screening, varying pace) and defense play 
(player to player, basic zone, shifting zone, triangle, 
and diagonal) is demonstrated and explained in this 
film. 
BASKETBALL TECHNIQUES FOR GIRLS, j-s-c-a, 

1 reel, $1.50 

Basic movement skills (running, starting, stopping, 
turning) passing (finger control, movement with the 
pass, leading the receiver, choice of the right pass), 
CPtching (side pass, high pass), shooting (finger con- 



trol, arm extension, wrist flip, choice of the right 

shot), dribbling, faking, and pivoting are demonstrated 

and explained in this film. 

BRECKINRIDGE COUNTY VS. COVINGTON HOLY 
CROSS (1965 Basketball Finals), e-j-s-c-a, 3 reels, 
(40 min.), color, silent, $1.00 
The Breckinridge County High School team which 

reached the finals in 1964, returned to take the state 

championship title in 1965. Led by Butch Beard, they 

defeated Covington Holy Cross 95-73. 

CHAMPIONSHIP BASKETBALL — TEAM TECH- 
NIQUES, j-s, 1 reel, $1.50 
Man-to-man defense is shown, with the means best 

used under varying conditions. 

DEFENSIVE FOOTWORK IN BASKETBALL, j-s-c-a, 

1 reel, $1.50 

Striding with an opponent, checking, maneuvering 
him out of position and other basic skills are illus- 
trated, using special photography to demonstrate points. 
Rebounding, pivoting, and correlated arm action Eire 
taught also. 
LOUISVILLE MALE VS. SHELBY COUNTY (1966 

Basketball Finals), e-j-s-c-a, 3 rools (30 min.), color, 

silent, $1.00 

In the action packed final game of the state high 
school tournament the Rockets of Shelby County won 
the state championship as the Bulldogs of Louisville 
Male were defeated by the score of 62-57 in Freedom 
Hall at Louisville. 
MONTICELLO VS. FLAGET (1960 K.H.S.A.A. STATE 

BASKETBALL TOURNAMENT FINALS) e-j-s-c-a, 

2 reels, color, silent, $1.00 

Flaget High School of Louisville defeated Monticello 
High School in the final game of the tournament to 
win the championship. The Braves came from behind 
in the last half to overtake the Trojans and win by 
a score of 65-56. 

NORTH MARSHALL VS. DUPONT MANUAL (1959) 
K.H.S. BASKETBALL TOURNAMENT FINALS, 
e-j-s-c-a, 3 reels, silent, $1.00 

The Indians of North Marshall High School proved 
too much for the Reds of duPont Manual in the final 
game, winning by a score of 64-63. All-State players, 
Doyle and Lampley were best for the winners, while 
Melear and Siers led the Reds. 

OFFICIAL BASKETBALL, e-j-s-c-a, 4 reels (40 min.), 
color, $1.00 

Demonstrates the official rules interpretations cover- 
ing screening, traveling, jump ball, front and back 
court throw-ins, free throws, personal and technical 
fouls, rebounding, and unusual and often misunderstood 
play situations. 

RUPP'S FUNDAMENTALS OF BASKETBALL, j-s-c-a, 
1 reel (11 min.), silent, $1.25 

Coach Rupp's University of Kentucky Wildcats (1949- 
50) demonstrate ten different plays. 
RUPP'S PARADE TO THE NATIONAL CHAMPION- 
SHIP OF 1958, j-s-c-a, 4 reels, $3.50 
This film presents the highlights of all the games, 
both regular season and tournament games, which 
led up to the U of K's Wildcats winning the NC^AA 
basketball crown. 

SENECA VS. BRECKINRIDGE COUNTY (1964 Basket- 
ball Finals), e-j-s-c-a, 3 reels (40 min.), color, silent, 
$1.00 

Seneca High School won the state championship for 
the second straight year by defeating Breckinridge 
County by the score of 66-56. 

SENECA VS. LEXINGTON DUNBAR (1963 BASKET- 
BALL FINALS), j-s-c-a, 4 reels, silent, color, $1.00 
The Seneca Indians defeated the Lexington Dunbar 
Bearcats by the score of 72-66 to win the forty-sixth 
annual state championship. Redd and Unseld led 
Seneca while Wilson and Smith were best for Dunbar. 
(Continued on Page Seven) 



The Kentucky High School Athlete 

Official Organ of the 
Kentucky High School Athletic Association 



VOL. xxrx— NO. 4 



NOVEMBER, 1966 



$1.00 Per Year 



Football Questions — Installment 2 

EDITOR'S NOTE: These interpretations of the 1966 
National Alliance Football rules do not set aside or 
modify any rule. They are made and published by the 
National Federation of State High School Athletic Asso- 
ciations in response to situations presented. 

19. Play: What guides should the official use in dis- 
tinguishing between ordinary pass interference and in- 
tentional interference which carries a second distance 
penalty? 

Ruling: The intentional forward pass interference foul 
will usually (but not always) occur when the defensive 
player finds himself in a position of disadvantage as a 
result of his opponent's skill or native ability. Occa- 
sionally, when a defensive player realizes he has been 
outmaneuvered, he will then attempt to prevent the 
pass from being completed by holding, pushing, or 
blocking his opponent. Such fouls are intentional and 
frequently are unnecessarily rough and unsportsman- 
like. The rules require that, in such cases, the official 
penalize an additional 15 yards. Fortunately, these fouls 
call for no judgment on the part of the official for the 
rule is specific in that "if the act (pass interference) 
by either A or B is unsportsmanlike, an additional 15 
yards is added." Not only is it mandatory that the 15 
yards be added, but if the unsportsmanlike aspect of the 
foul is flagrant, the offender must be disqualified. Valid 
evidence conclusively proves that it is poor strategy to 
deliberately interfere during a forward pasj play. In a 
study of the forward passes in 600 interscholastic 
games, 44% were completed. The average gain per 
completed pass was 13.5 yards. The average gain per 
attempted pass was slightly under 6 yards. The longer 
the -^ass, the fewer were completed. The survey gave 
evidence that only one out of five of the longer passes 
was completed. To pay a penalty of 15 yards for inter- 
ference plus 15 yards for unsportsmanlike conduct for 
intentionally interfering with a pass which has a pre- 
dicted 20°; possibility of being completed is not sound 
strategy. In addition, there is possibility of disqualifi- 
cation if the act is flagrant. The offended team is also 
awarded an automatic 1st down. If the competition is 
equable, the penalty is too great for a player to pur- 
posely commit forward pass interference. 

20. Play: Free-kick by K from its 40 yardline goes 
out-of-bounds on K's 45: (a) before being touched by 
either K or R or (b) after being touched by either K 
or R. 

Ruling: R will put the ball in play by a snap at the 
inbounds spot (K's 45) in (a). In (b), it will also be put 
in play by R on K's 45 if it has been touched by R. In 
case the touching has been by K. if the short free-kick 
penalty has been refused, the ball will be put in play 
on K's 45. However, if as a result of touching by K, the 
short free-kick penalty is accepted, K must free-kick 
again from its 35. 

21. Play: Punt strikes the ground beyond the neutral 
zone and is first touched by Kl on R's 30. The ball then 
rolls to R's 15 where Rl recovers and advances to his 
25, where he is tackled. 

RuUng: Legal advance by Rl. First touching by Kl 
does not cause the ball to become dead. R has choice 
of taking the ball at spot of first touching by Kl (R's 
30) or the spot where the run by Rl ended (R's 25). In 



the case cited, R would undoubtedly take the ball at 
the spot of first touching. 

22. Play: 7 B players line up within 5 yards of their 
free-kick line for a kick-off. At the time the ball is 
actually kicked, 5 B players are within 5 yards of their 
line but 2 of the B players have retreated so they are 
straddling their 45 yardline. 

Ruling: There has been no infraction. 

23. Play: During a try-for-point. Al receives the 
snap and either becomes confused or, in an apparent 
effort to drop-kick the ball, he ends up by punting the 
ball. The punted ball: (a) goes through the uprights; 
or (b) the punted ball is blocked and rolls into the end 
zone where A2 falls on it; or (c) the punted bail touches 
the ground on the one yard line where A2 picks it up 
;md runs it into the end zone, or (d) is recovered be- 
hind the line-of-scrimmage by A2 who runs the ball into 
the end zone. 

RuUng: In (a), (b) and (c), the try is unsuccessful. 
In (d), the point after touchdown attempt scores. Team 
A may score a point after touchdown from what would 
ordinarily be a touchdown or a field goal (or a safety 
by B). Therefore, A could not score a try by punting 
the ball through the goal posts. However, the fact that 
A punts the ball does not end the ti-y and there is noth- 
ing "illegal" about the punt. The play should be treated 
as it would be in any other down. If the punt is recov- 
ered behind the line-of-scrimmage by A, it is still a Uve 
ball and A may advance it for what v\ould ordinarily be 
a touchdown (in this case, a successful try). When the 
punted ball (blocked or not) is caught, or recovered 
beyond the line, or touches anything on or behind B's 
goal line, the try is ended. 

24. Play: Kl punts from the end zone and while the 
ball is in flight, time for the 1st quarter expires. K2 
commits fair catch interference. Team R elects to free 
kick with the 1st quarter extended by an untimed down. 
During the untimed down, the team makin,g the kick is 
offside. The kick is successful and would score a field 
goal it the penalty were refused. 

Ruling: If the penalty is accepted, the team making 
the kick during the untimed down is penalized 5 yaitis, 
goals are changed and that team must again attempt a 
free kick. The kicking team does not have the privilege 
of changing its option. This privilege is denied in 5-2A. 

25. Play: Al snaps with only six A players on the 
line-of-scrimmage. 

Ruling: Illegal position (procedure). Clock starts 
when ball is next snapped. 

26. Play: Team A or B takes a charged time-out. Al 
and his coach confer on the field within 5 yards of the 
sideline and directly in front of the team box. The coach 
uses a short wave radio (walkie-talkie) to communi- 
cate with a team representative in the press box. 

Ruling: Unsportsmanlike conduct. The use of the 
short wave radio brings a third person into the confer- 
ence. 

27. Play: Al is approximately 8 yards from the ball 
and he goes down field approximately 3 yards and cuts 
to his left over center immediately following the snap. 
Linebacker Bl wards off Al. Both take two or three 
steps and both are falling down when the pass is made 
in the direction of Al. 

(Continued on Page Nine) 



Page Two 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR NOVEMBER, 19«b 



NOVEMBER, 19S6 



VOL XXIX— NO. 4 



Pablished monthly, except June and July, by the Kentucky 

High School Athletic Association 

Office of Publication, Lexington, Ky. 40501 

Second class postage paid at Lexington, Kentucky. 

Editor — THEO, A. SANFORU 

Assistant Editor J. B. MANSFIELD 

Lexington, Ky. 
BOARD OF CONTROL 

President Sherman Gish (1963-67). Greenville 

Vice-President Don Davis (1963-67), Independence 

Directors — Morton Combs (1964-68), Carr Creek: Ralph C. 
Dorsey (1966-70) Horse Cave; Preston Holland (1965-69). 
Murray: Don R. Rawlings (1965-69), Danville: Foster J. 
Sanders (1966-70 . Louisville; Oran C. Teater (1964-68). 
Paintsville. 

Subscription Rate $1.90 Per Year 

-f%ow tne Commissioned s Dffice 



REPORTS SOON DUE 

1. 1966 Football Participation List 

2. School's Report on Football Officials 

3. Official's Report on Schools (Football) 



National Federation Basketball Test 

Part II of the National Federation bas- 
ketball examination will be given all over 
Kentucky on Monday, December 5, to offi- 
cials who wish to work for the Approved 
and Certified ratings. Officials registered 
with the K.H.S.A.A. for the first time this 
year and who have not been registered pre- 
viously in any other state association, are 
not eligible to take the test. Those interest- 
ed should advise the State Office immedi- 
ately in order that necessary arrangements 
can be made with the school administrators 
who will supervise the taking of the exam. 
Officials living in Kentucky need not sug- 
gest the name of an examiner. The Ap- 
proved rating does not carry forward from 
year to year, but must be earned each year, 

Aporoved and Certified Officials 

Jerry C. Roof and James L. Wright have 
qualified recently as Approved football offi- 
cials, Bernard Johnson as a Certified of- 
ficial. 

Attention, Football Coaches! 

In this issue of the ATHLETE, certain 
changes in the Football Playoffs i-egula- 
tions, madt by the Board of Control in 
the October meeting, appear. Of a special 
interest to administrators and football 
coaches will be the following substitu- 
tion for II-C: "To qualify for a district 
championship, a team shall play a mini- 
mum of four games in its class within the 
district. If the principal is unable to sched- 
ule this minimum within the district, then 
games played with other teams in the same 
class will be used in determining the team's 



rating." Also appearing in this issue of the 
magazine is the listing of football districts 
and regions for the seasons of 1967 and 
1968. 

K.H.S.C.A. Notice 
Prin. Joe Ohr of the Irvine High School, 
Secretary-Treasurer of the Kentucky High 
School Coaches Association, states that the 
membership fee in his Association has been 
changed from §1.00 to $2.00. This fee in- 
crease was authorized by the Executive 
Committee of the K.H.S.C.A. in its August 
meeting. 



Future Football Districts and Regions 

The football districts and regions for 
1967 and 1968 are as follows: 

Class AAA 
REGION I 

Atherton, Bishop David, Central. DeSales, duPont Manual, 
Flaget, Iioquois, Male, Shawnee. St. Xavier, Trinity 

REGION II 

District 1 — 

Butler. Fairdale, Pleasure Ridge Park. Southern, Valley, 
Western 
District 2 — 

Durrett. Eastern, Fern Creek, Seneca, Thomas Jefferson, 
Waggener, Westport 

Class AA 
REGION I 

District 1 — • 

Bowling Green, Caldwell County. Christian County, Frank- 
lin-Simpson. Hopkins ville, Madisonville, Mayfield, Paducah 
Tilghman 
District 2 — 

Daviess County, Henderson, Henderson County, Ohio Coun- 
ty, Owensboro, Owensboro Catholic, Union County 
REGION II 

District 1— 

Breckinridge County. Elizabethtown, Fort Knox, LaRue Coun- 
ty, Meade County, North Hardin, Oldham County, St. Joseph 
Prep, Shelby County 
District 2— 

Danville, Henry Clay, Jessamine County, Lafayette, Madi- 
son, Somerset, Woodford County 

REGION III 

District 1 — 

Boone County, Boyd County, Campbell County, Dixie Heights, 
Highlands. Holmes, Newport, Newport Catholic, Paul G. Bla- 
zer, Russell. Simon Kenton 
District 2— 

Bourbon County. Bryan Station, Dunbar, Franklin County. 
George Rogers Clark. Harrison County. Madison Central, Tates 
Creek 

REGION IV 

District 1 — 

Bell County, Corbin, Cumberland, Evarts, James A. Cawood, 
Knox Central. Middlesboro, Whitley County 
District 2 — 

Belfry, Hazard, Leslie County. M. C. Napier, Prestonsburg, 
Whitesburg 

Class A 

REGION I 

District 1— 

Crittenden County, P'ort Campbell. Fulton, Fulton County, 
Murray, North Marshall. Russellville, Trigg County 
District 2— 

Butler County. Campbellsville. Cumberland County, Glasgow, 
Greensburg, Metcalfe County, Tompkins ville, Warren County 

REGION II 

District 1 — 

Bardstown. Eminence, Henry County, K. M. I., Lebanon, 
Louisville Country Day, Old Kentucky Home. Shelbyville, Shep- 
herdsville. Washington County 
District 2— 

Anderson. Berea, Boyle County, Burgin, Frankfort, Garrard 
County. Georgetown, Harrodsburg, Ky. School for the Deaf, 
Mercer County. Say re. Scott County. Stanford 

REGION III 

District 1— 

Beech wood. Bellevue. Carroll County, Dayton, Falmouth. 
Lloyd Memorial. Ludlow. Owen County 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR NOVEMBER, 19K6 

Bath County, Fleming County, Irvine, M. M. I., Montgomery 
County Mt. Sterling, Nicholas County, Pans, Rowan Countj 

REGION IV 

District 1 — , . ^ ., ^ , 

Fleming-Neon, Harlan, Hazel Green, Jenkins, Lily, L.onaon, 
Lynch, Lynn Camp, Mt. Vernon, Pineville, Williamsburg 
District 2 — n, i?- ii 

Catlettsburg, Elkhorn City, Johns Creek, Louisa, McKell, 
Morgan County. Paintsvilie, Pikeville, Raceland, Wheelwright, 
Wurtland 



Page Three 



In Memoriam 



SUPPLEMENTARY LIST OF 
REGISTERED FOOTBALL OFFICIALS 

(List Compiled November 1) 
If the telephone number Is given for an official listed, it 
is the home phone number unless otherwise designated. If two 
numbers are given, the first number is that of the home 

Bolte,' Fritz, 1059 Roxie Lane, Cincinnati, Ohio, 521-0472, 891- 

Byars, Michael Kirk, 335 Stoneybrook. Lexington, 278-2614, 

254-9895 
Caldwell, Charles M., Route No. 3, Box 296. ProctorviUe, 

Ohio, 886-6546, Huntington. W. Va. 629-1311 
Crandall, Karl N., 230 North Pin Oak Drive, Lexington, 278- 

5053, 278-5053 ,„„„ 

Deutsch, T. C, 3130 Bellevue Ave., Cincinnati, Ohio, 961-4366, 

751-8440 
Duncan, Paul H., 4205 Oak St., New Boston, Ohio, 466-4779, 

456-4637 
Egan, Joseph P.. 3305 Utah No. 4, Louisville, 366-6661. 582- 

3511 ext. 244 
Hamilton, Vernon K., 4213 Kirby Ave., Cincinnati, Ohio, 681. 

4284 
Holton, Glenn H., 121 Nelson Court, Barboursville, W. Va., 

736-6666. 529-4173 ext. 20 
Hughes, Robert E., 610 East 8th St., Eussellville, 726-6334, 

726-6335 
Johnson, Bernard, 322 Blueberry, Lexington, 277-2883. 252-2200 

ext. 2517 
Keeton, C. E.. 242 Emmett, Bowling Green. 842-4335, 843-3040 
Law, William, 1072 Pamela Drive, Cincinnati, Ohio, 231-2459, 

441-0068 
Pinson, Eugene. 3208 Hackworth St., Ashland, 324-6548, 324- 

3101 
Potter, Nat Douglass, 521 Brentmoor Drive, Bowling Green, 

842-7894, 842-7894 
Russell, Charles B., Jr., P. O. Box 228, Lynch, 848-2866 
Smith, Richard T., C Btry 4th Bn 60th Arty, Ft. Bliss, Texas, 

568-9415 (Bus.) 
Staley, E. G.. 1117 Inca Trail, Georgetown, 1091, 1000 
Starling, Edward, Williamson High School. Williamson, W. Va. 
Stigger, Charles E., 1020 St. Paul Court. Louisville, 583-5177, 

687-8864 
Watkins. James, 1607 Thornberry, Louisville, 368-4032, 683-4327 

Minutes of Board Meeting 

The Board of Control of the Kentucky High School 
Athletic Association met at the Plioenix Hotel, Lexing- 
ton, on Saturday afternoon, October 1, 1966. The meet- 
ing was called to order by President Sherman Gish at 
1:00, with Board members Morton Combs, Don Davis, 
Ralph C. Dorsey, Don R. Rawlings, Foster J. San- 
ders, and Oran C. Teater; Commissioner Theo. A. 
Sanford, and Assistant Commissioner J. B. Mans- 
field present. The invocation was given by the Com- 
missioner. 

Don Davis moved, seconded by Oran C. Teater, that 
the reading of the minutes of the July 20th meeting be 
waived, since the members of the Board had received 
copies of these minutes. The motion was carried unan- 
imously. 

President Gish announced the appointment of the 
following committees for 1966-67: 

Policy— Chairman Don Davis, Preston Holland, Mor- 
ton Combs 

Budget— Chairman Don R. Rawlings, Oran C. Teater, 
Ralph C. Dorsey 

Trophy— Chairman Foster J. Sanders, Theo. A. San- 
ford, J. B. Mansfield 

Swimming— Chairman Alfred M. Reece (Lexington), 
E. W. Craik (Louisville), Jack Thompson (Louisville), 
Marshall Beard (Louisville), Miss Sheila Gilreath (Ash- 
land), Don Davis (Independence), Mrs. Wilbur Bell 
(Continued on page Eleven) 




CHARLES ALLPHIN 

Charles Allphin, 58, Grant County school 
superintendent on leave, died on September 
28, 1966, in a Covington hospital. He start- 
ed out as a 17-year-old teacher in a country 
school, and rose to be Kentucky's Commis- 
sioner of Welfare. Mr. Allphin, a Grant 
County native, returned to the county's 
schools after serving in the 1955-59 admin- 
istration of Governor A. B. Chandler. 

Mr. Allphin had experience as a teacher, 
principal, supervisor, superintendent, band 
director, and athletic coach in Kentucky 
schools. He attended school at Crittenden 
High School and at Highlands High School, 
where he became an all-state basketball 
player. He received his A. B. degree from 
Eastern Kentucky State College, and his 
M. A. degree from the University of Cin- 
cinnati. 

Mr. Allphin was basketball coach at Wal- 
ton (1926-29), Florence (1930-33), and 
Highlands (1936-53). He had been principal 
of the Ruth Moyer School, Ft. Thomas; 
principal of Beechwood High School, So. Ft. 
Mitchell; principal, Ludlow School, Ludlow; 
coordinator of instructional audiovisual cen- 
ter for 28 Campbell County schools ; super- 
intendent of Williamstown schools, Wil- 
liamstown; teacher and coach in schools of 
Grant, Kenton, Campbell, Boone, and Pen- 
dleton counties ; supervisor and superin- 
tendent of Grant County schools. 

Membership was held by Mr. Allphin in 
numerous educational and fraternal organi- 
zations. He was a member of the Critten- 
den Baptist Church, where he was a deacon, 



Pase Foui 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR NOVEMBER, 1966 



the church treasurer, and a Sunday school 
teacher. He is survived by his wife, the for- 
mer Lucy DeMoisey, a teacher at Beech- 
wood School; his mother, Mrs. Alvin All- 
phin; a sister, Mrs. Fred Brown; two neph- 
ews and many other relatives. 



SUPPLEMENTARY LIST OF 
REGISTEKED BASKETBALL OFFICIALS 

(List Compiled October 24) 
It one telephone number is given for an official listed, it is 
the home phone unless otherwise designated. If two numbers 
are given, the first number is that of the home phone. 

Abnev. Bob, 342 Stratford Drive. Lexirgton, 277-4706, 266-0115 
Adair Lewis C. 5307 Lost Trail. Louisville, 361-2775, 587-7531 
Allen, Joe, 304 Braden, HopkinsviUe. 886-6534, 886-2433 
Allnutt, Danny Clav, Route No. 4. Owenton, 484-3962 
Anderson, Edward L., 448 Walnut St., Lebanon, 692-4773. 

692-3605 
Arbuckle, Kenneth, 126 Wickliffe, Greenville, 338-4514 
Armstrong, Jerris A., 2812 Pomeroy, Louisville, 451-4028, 684- 

9761 
Asbach, Robert, 629 Church, Cincinnati, Ohio, 221-7440, 562- 

3653 
Bailey, Frank, 454-A 8th Ave., Fort Knox, 4-3479. 4-5856 
Baldwin. Ron, 2437 Madison, Covington, 581-4203 
Bearden, James T„ Route No. 4, Dawson Springs. SW 7-5644 
Bingham, Bennie, Box 88, Worthington, 836-4208 
Blackwood, Tom, 345 Lombardy Drive, Berea, Ohio. Louisville 

582-1920 (Bus.) 
Blevins Boone, Jr., Staffordsville, 297-3336, 265-2164 
Blevins, Robert L., 410 Wolford St.. Pikeville, 437-6846, 7-7338 
Boyd, Tommy, 7908 Greenway Drive, Louisville, 425-6417, 464- 

4613 
Bradford, Robert L.. 9 Tremont, Ft. Thomas, 781-1217, 761-3600 
Bradley, Bob, N. 41, Di.xon, 639-9511, 639-2651 
Bradley, Delano R., P. O. Box 122. Goshen, Ohio, 625-7741, 

271-0422 
Bradshaw, Bill, Box 195, Burgin, 748-5265, 748-6180 
Brock, Lavone E., Stoney Fork, 837-3271, 337-3271 
Browder, Homer Lee, 405 Fair St., Henderson, 826-2123, 827- 

5671 ext. 45 
Bruner, Jack C, Route No. 6. Box 29J, London, 864-4322, 864- 

2701 
Buchanan, John W., 1536 Alexandria Drive, Apt. 7A. Lex- 
ington. 278-6967, 277-5430 
Bush. Karmen B., 3642 Windward Way. Louisville. 458-6465, 

937-2300 
Butler, Ronald Eugene, 126 Hamilton Park, Lexington, 252-0372 
Bvars, Michael Kirk, 336 Stoneybrook, Lexington, 278-2614, 

254-9896 
Byron, Lou. 613 Pine St., Louisville, 585-4424, 447-3442 
Callighan, Robert Wells, University Station, Box 918, Murray, 

762-2758 
Canady, Ray B., Court Square. Barbourville, 646-4766, 646-3801 
Carroll. Joe E., Falcon, 349-3896, 349-3194 
Cavil, Leonard J., 510 E. Maple, Nicholasville, 885-4661, 886- 

4849 
Chandler, Mel, School Street, Williamsburg, 628-6382, 649-3901 
Clair, Charles Cecil, Route 7, Box 144, Jackson, 666-6714, 666- 

9223 
Clark, Kenneth. Route No. 1, Calhoun. BR S-3122 
Clark. Larry W., 1603 Sunshine Drive, Key West, Fla. 
Clark, Robert L., 3003-G, Hammond Heights, 798-4779. 798-3320 
Clary, Kenneth, 33 South Holloway, Henderson, VA 6-8966 
Claypool, Thomas W., Route No. 2. Owensboro, 684-8719 
Cobb, Michael B., P. O. Box 1022, Bowling Green, 842-9073, 

843-6191 
Collier. Burnard, Route No. 1, Box 21E, Pikeville, GE 7-4344, 

353-7362 
Conley, George, 2436 Roosevelt Ave., Ashland, 324-6042 
Conley. Lester Art, 943 W. McKelvey Road, Cincinnati, Ohio, 

522-8824 
Conley, Meritt. Box 48. Mousie, 946-3220 
Crawford, Donald R., Nicholasville, 88.5-5251. Lexington, 277- 

3571 ext. 36 
Creech, Robert, Rogers. Ky.. 668-3300 

Creekmore, Ken. Box 514, Oneida, Tenn.. 569-8734, 669-8720 
Cundiff, Curt. Dry Creek Rd., Box 30, Clearfield. 784-4516 
Cundiff, W. John. Box 283. Greenville, 338-1748, 338-1748 
Curley. Tom, 4501 South 6th St., Apt. No. 27. Louisville. 366- 

4228, 582-2613 
Davis, Harold. Box 191, Beaver Dam, 274-4159, 274-3870 
Davis, John W.. Route No. 2. Georgetown, 863-3779, 863-1264 
Decker. Dennis L., 107 Earl, Crane, Indiana, 854-7496, 864-1245 
DeHart, Gary. Route No. 3, Morehead 
Denney, Murrell C, Eubank, 379-4440 (Bus.) 
Denton, William D., 127 S. Hubbard Lane. Henderson, VA 6- 

4020, Bowling Green 842-9260 
Dieterle, Owen M., Box 135, Millersburg, 484-2076, Lexington 

252-0640 
Donald. Edward William, 4098 Farragut St., Fort Knox, 

4-6872, 4-6811 



Dryden, Wallace Lee, 163 E. Maxwell, Le.xington, 252-2733. 

252-2733 
Duerson, William Robert, Route No. 2, Paint Lick, 925-2367, 

792-2469 
Dykes, Larry, Boox 273, College Heights, Bowling Green, 

842-4194, 746-4295 
Elliott, Eric, 202 North 13th St., Murray, 763-6611 
Elliott, Humphrey T., Box 113, Liberty, 787-6666, 787-6941 
Farlee, Harold, 2364 Grinstead Drive, Louisville, 459-5818, 459- 

5818 
Farmer, Jack. Route No. 8, Danville, 236-3192, 236-2711 
Flynn, Reynolds, 1414 Sleepy Hollow Rd., Parkhills, Co-\ ing- 

ton, 581-9837, 431-6080 
Ford, Eddie L., 1206 College Court, Murray, 762-2753 
Frank, Charles E., 2312 Joyce, Newport, 441-7084, 662-5343 
Frankel, Louis S., 3723 Stanton Blvd., Louisville, 454-6619, 

454-6519 
Frey. Jerry. Route No. 2, Springfield, Tenn., 384-7093 
Fritz, Robert G., 1716 Parkview Drive, HopkinsviUe, 886-3948 
Fritz, Sherman, 122 Meadowlark Drive, Richmond, 623-4956, 

623-3424 
Furgerson, William W., 703 South 16th St., Murray, 753-1336, 

762-3589 
Gabbard, Donald Lee. Box 184, Lerose, 593-3435, 666-2481 
Gabbard, John B., 118 West 9th St., London, 864-6082, 864-2863 
Gorence. John P., 3508 Charlane Parkway, Jeffersontown, 

267-6232, 267-7728 
Graham. James E., 4506 Blackburn Ave., Ashland, 324-8169, 

324-1155 ext. 376 
Graves, Preston H., Marrowbone, 864-3604 
Halbert. Hubert, Box 19, Langley, BU 5-3748 
Hall, Charles E., 425 Yale Drive, Lexington, 278-3996, 299-6212 
Hamilton, Dallas Augustus, Inez, 298-3357 
Hardin, Don G., Box 88. Morehead, 784-7376 
Hardin, Stanley. 3510 Newburg Road, Louisville 451-8612 
Hargis. Noel, Box 91A, Science Hill, 423-3456 
Harned, Vic, 216 West Walnut, Leitchfield, 269-4149, 259-4196 
Harper, Robie, Beechmont, 476-8084, 476-2630 
Harris, Richard. Route No. 4, Nancy 
Hausfeld. Walter, 3080 Crestmoor, Cincinnati, Ohio, 922-5164, 

521-0800 
Hawkins, Will A., 407 Grace St. Springfield, Tenn., 384-8978, 

384-5683 
Haynes, John, 416 Clay, Henderson, VA 7-6137 
Haynes, William T., 1011 Second, Henderson, VA 7-3388, 424- 

7741 
Henderson, Austin, 243 W. Robbins, Covington, 291-6714, 431- 

0900 
Hendon, Charles, Route No. 1. Mayfield, 328-4458 
Hendrix, Jack, Box 342, Manchester. 864-2075, 864-2331 
Henson, Tony C, Route No. 6, Mayfield, 658-3126, Paducah 

443-1165 
Hicks, Francis Gene, 101 Sycamore, Pikeville, 2-2268 
Highbaugh, Ottis, Box 135, Bonnieville, 631-1875, 531-1200 
Hinkle, Melvin B., 519 Dobbin Drive. Paris. 987-4201, 987-1236 
Holthouser, Terry W., 5322 Georgia Lane. Louisville 
Home. Jordan E., Jr., 3804 Frontier Trail, Louisville, 461- 

6624, 684-6215 
Howard, Henry Dewayne, Pineville, 337-3989, 248-2366 
Howard, Jimmy D.. 1932 Madison, Paducah, 443-1333, 442-1649 
Howard, Robert E., Kettle Island, 337-3897, 337-5260 
Hulette, Walter D., Box 69D, Bardstown, 348-5049, 348-5049 
Hunley, Neil P., 672 Main St.. West Liberty, 743-4311, 743-4513 
Hunter, Wayne C, Route No. 1, Nicholasville, 885-3110, 885-4139 
Hyatt, Bob, 2309 Hikes Lane, Louisville. 461-0091, 587-8611 
Idol. Billy Joe, 124 Leafwood Rd., Middlesboro, 248-2837 
Jackson, Robert H., Hitchins 
Jenkins, James D., Route No. 1, Bowling Green, 842-3088, 

842-5954 
Johnson, Gene B., 103 Redding St., Glasgow. 661-2587, 678-2722 
Johnson, Jack D.. Box 275, Burgin, 748-5773, 748-6170 
Johnson. Ronald L., 3304 Southgate Drive, HopkinsviUe. 885- 

5242, 475-4261 
Jones, Daniel R., Cleaton, 764-4660 
Jones, Frank, Box 718, Manchester, 598-2706 
Kays. Herbert S., 1801 Spring Drive, Louisville 
Kazee, Allan, 5334-F Brett Drive, Ft. Knox, 4-3898, 4-4268 
Kearns, Donnie Howard, 303 Glydon Ave.. Richmond, 623-6682 
Keeton, C. E., 242 Emmett. Bowling Green, 842-4336. 843-3040 
Kidwell, James S., 1112 Parkway. Covington. 581-9141 
Kinder, Tommy M., 314 22nd St.. S.E., Charleston. W. Va. 
Kinney, Charles L., Route No. 1, Hustonville. 365-7040. 365-7116 
Lacev, Wayne, 3003 Palmer Circle, Henderson. VA 7-1407 
Landers, John F., 32 Charlemagne, Clarksville. Tenn., 647- 

2656, 798-6806 
Lawson. Rondall. Box 268. Prestonsburg, 886-3509, 886-9391 
Lay, William B., 1268 Gainesway Drive, Lexington, 266-5243, 

252-2260 ext. 3104 
Lester, Harold. Route No. 3, Harrodsburg. 734-3207 
Letcher, Ronnie. Route No. 2. Carlisle. 756, 99 
Lindsey, Jack. Blackey, Whitesburg 633-7666 (Bus.) 
Logan. Donald E.. Falmouth, 654-3583, 654-3683 
Louden, Forrest W., Bedford. 842-9790 
Louden, Hubert C, 4815 Red Start Road, Louisville, 964-2639, 

684-4141 
Lucas. Gene T., 100 Lemons Mill Bd., Georgetown, 863-2988, 

863-3505 
Lykins, James O., 515 Erlanger Road, Erlanger, 341-2447 
Maines. George E., 632 Millvale Drive, Lexington. 278-1984, 

262-2363 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR NOVEMBER. 1966 



Page Five 



Marcum, Homer F., Box 415. Lovely. 395-5294, GE 7-9191 

Markham, James R.. 371 South Lime. Lexington 

Mason. Edwin M., Marwill Apts.. Canollton, 732-5256. 732-4411 

Mauk. Michael Joe, 919 West Main. Moieliead. 784-4412 

May, William Darwin, Taylor St., Flatwoods, 836-3395. 325- 

4741 
Mayes. Edward, 838 Crossbill Road. Danville, 236-3264, 236-6131 
Maynard. William D., Box 79, Catlettsburg, 525-7641 ext. 252 

(Bus.) 
Mays, Charles R., Morehead St. Univ.. Carter Hall No. 10. 

Morehead 
Miles. Marvin, 129 Mill St., Henderson, VA 7-1592 
Mills, Joseph A.. 4222 Sunset Drive. Louisville 
Mingua. Ronald, Route No. 1. Germantown, 728-2587, 728- 

Mitchell, Billy N., Swann Dorm. Murray. 753-3368, 762-3581 

Moore. James H.. Route No. 2. Box 92A. Hardinsburg, 788-3978 

Moore. Marvin. Box 897. Martin. BU 5-3189 

Moore. Roy, Jr., Box 28, London. 864-5023. 864-5944 

Mudd, Ed.. 3512 Mildred Drive. Louisville. 448-1609 

Murray. James Paul. Brockton. Box GGG, Richmond, 623-9494 

Newnam, Larry Glen, Box 188. Beattyville. 464-2560 

Newton, C. M., 2041 Dellwood Drive. Lexington, 277-0494, 

255-2960 ext. 282 
Overby, Jerry. Route No. 6. Murray, 436-2454. 753-1250 
Pack. James W.. Route No. 1, Box 75. Catlettsburg, 739-6430, 

Ashland 324-1111 ext. 8405 
Patterson. William E., 574 Oak St.. Madisonville, 821-1369, 

821-6833 
Payne, Gayle, Bethlehem, 878-59S0, 878-5980 
Pergrem. Nard. 3315 Pine Haven Place. Ashland. 324-7664. 

324-1155 ext. 371 
Phillips. Harold. Route No. 8, Forest Hills, Clarksville, Tenn.. 

647-0888. 645-6471 
Purdy. Jesse W., 100 Derrineei Ave., Springfield. 336-7589, 

336-3718 
Queen. Donald. Route No, 1. Pikeville. 432-2023 
Rash. Lindell L.. Box 278. Mortons Gap. 258-5136. 258-5362 
Redman. Melvin. Route No. 3. Box 40. Mt. Vernon, Ind., 783- 

2276. 838-3791 
Reed. Andrew. Elsie 
Reed, William F., Sr., 633 Dartmoor Drive, Lexington, 299- 

1130, 255-6010 
Reeves. Curtis R., 608 Barkley St.. Falmouth. 654-5241 
Reinhardt. Myron Stanley, Box 40332, Alexandria. 635-5724. 

694-6181 
Reliford. Paul G.. 4130 Cabell. Ashland 325-7457 
Renfro. John. Box 298. Florence Ave., Williamsburg, 6488. 6808 
Reschar. John V.. Sr.. 5518 Pico Lane. Louisville. 969-3885, 

239-2367 
Reule, Ronald. Box 56. Germantown, 728-2761 
Rexroat, Jerry Lawrence. 7424 Jamaica Drive. Louisville. 935- 

2116. 447-3221 
Reynolds. Thomas, 3204 Hackworth St., Ashland, 324-1813, 

324-0666 
Rhodes. Cecil. Box 291. Barbourville. 6-4777 
Rice, William L., 3011 Jefferson. Evansville. Ind.. 477-3676, 

424-4309 
Rich, Dennis W., Crittenden Road. Oerona. 485-7233. 356-3741 
Ricketts. Donald R., 2005 Dianne Court, Evansville, Ind., 476- 

3139 
Rieman, Robert S., 2004 Dallas Ave., Cincinnati, Ohio, 522- 

3694. 522-3694 
Rife. Don C. Box 65. Inez, 298-3553. 298-3577 
Riggins. Jason M.. Box 417. Man. W. Va. 

Riggs. Floyd L.. Box 400. Evansville. Ind.. 867-3090. 425-3346 
Ring. Bill. 481 Rookwood Parkway. Lexington. 299-7089. 254- 

1776 
Rison. Johnny B.. 197 3rd St.. Ravenna, 723-2862 
Rister. Edgar L.. Box 213. Garrett. 358-4428 
Ritter, Goebel, 415 Cornelia Ave.. Whitesburg, 633-7164, 633- 

4465 
Roach, Earl Wilton, Star Route, Mayfield. 247-6078. Fulton 

472-3712 
Roberts. Donald. Bob-A-Link. Harrodsburg. 734-4765, 734-3673 
Roberts. Kenneth G.. 901 Brown Ave.. Shelbyville 
Robertson, William R., 121 Main, Springfield, 336-7154, 336- 

9977 
Robinson, Don L., 2012 Poplar St.. Kenova. W. Va. 
Roby. Joseph L.. 1412 Ford Ave.. Owensboro. 684-6786, 684- 

3209 
Rodgers. H. Tom. 721 Park Court. Madisonville. 821-7312. 338- 

3800 
Roe. Doyle. Jr., Isom, 633-2068. 633-2339 
Roeckers, Bernie, 803 Loda Drive. Cincinnati. Ohio. 752-1140, 

831-2990 
Roeckers, Walter, 5113 Imwalle Ave.. Cincinnati, Ohio. 242-2676, 

562-6941 
Roesel. Joseph, 22 Retreat St.. Southgate. 781-0058, 621-1300 
Rogers. Howard D., 17 Maryland Ave., Winchester, 744-1785, 

299-1221 ext. 5212 
Rohrbracher. Lt. Richard. 1228-A Werner Park, Ft. Campbell 
Roller. Otis. 808 Chambery Drive, Louisville. 895-6356, 587- 

1121 ext. 309 
Rolph, Harold J., 915 South 7th St., Ironton, Ohio. 532-4036. 

532-3231 
Romer. Dick, Kentucky Wesleyan College. Owensboro. 683-9194 
Roos, Robert, Route No. 1. Chamberlain Lane. Louisville 
Rubarts. Leland G.. Dunnville. 787-7500, 787-7662 



Runyon, Tommy Dean, Box 181, Belfry, 353-7883 
Russell. Allen. 1503 Sycamore. Murray, 753-2832. 444-6311 
Russell, Eugene. 1106 Gallia St., Portsmouth, Ohio, 353-2103, 

353-21U3 
Russman, Godfrey I'., 1011 Goss Ave.. Louisville, 635-7426 

(Bus.) 
Sagers. Robert M.. 494 Morrvue Drive, Cincinnati, Ohio. 

921-0724, 251-4510 
Sallee, Alan Lee, 3236 North Talbot Road. Erlanger. 341- 

3556. PL 1-2808 
Salyer, Henry E.. 4829 Bluebird Ave., Louisville, 969-6371, 

778-2731 ext. 156 
Sammons. Terry. 1308 Burnt Cedar Lane. Louisville 
Sams. Glenn. Auburn. 642-6139, 843-4363 
Sanders. Jack E.. Price Road. Lexington. 254-8810 
Saylor. Lanny Ross. Box 191. Wallins Creek. 664-3918, 664-3444 
Saylors, Carlee, Route No. 3. Murray. 753-7979 
Schad. Jim. 10717 Chelmsford Road, Forest Park, Ohio, S25- 

3343, 931-1260 
Schleicher. Richard L.. Route No. 2. Borden, Ind., 246-3232, 

Louisville 582-6728 
Schlich. Paul. 3315 Dean Drive, Louisville. 468-6765. 896-0211 
Schlickman. Stephen. 617 St. Joseph Lane, Park Hills. CO 1- 

4064 
Schmidt. Frank L.. 4902 Rural Way. Louisville. 964-5613 
Schmidt, Thomas C 9208 Matilda Court. Louisville. 964-1246, 

452-9791 
Schmitt. Paul E.. 3864 Darlene Drive. Louisville, 778-5355, 

635-5251 
Sehnebelt, Carl R.. Box 334. Hanover. Ind., 866-3581, 866-3522 
Scott, Emmanuel H.. 1614 Potter Place, Cincinnati, Ohio. 281- 

6928 
Scott. Kenneth E.. Box 394. Richmond. 623-9547 
Scott. Paul Douglas. 2361'. Sycamore, Pikeville, 432-1943, 437- 

6870 
Scott, W. L.. 1816 McDonald Rd.. Lexington, 278-2844, 254-1818 
Scott, Willie L.. 217 Showalter Drive, Georgetown. 863-3867, 

863-3321 
Sears, Wilson, 524 Springdale Road. Brandenburg. 422-2805, 

422-3214 
Seavers. Joseph E.. 2517 Ann St.. Ludlow, 341-0213, 291-8925 
Selvv, Curt. 118 Earls. Corbin. 528-4677. 528-4677 
Sergent. James V.. 3716 Blackburn. Ashland. 326-2474 
Settle, Rov G., Inl8 Sioux Place, Owensboro. 683-2136. 684-9441 
Sexton. Steven C. Box 354. Whitesburg. 633-7114. 573-3012 
Shadle. Clark. 334 Knox. Barbourville, 546-4746, 546-3920 
Sharp, Lloyd, Box 244, Dixon. 639-6267. 639-2851 
Shartzer. E. Philip. 4008 Hvcliffe. Louisville. 893-7108. 636-1361 
Shaver. Perry A.. Box 128. Bremen. 525-3443. 626-3551 
Shaw. Earl. 121 Hagan Court, Lancaster, 792-2370, 548-2208 
Shearer, Robert L.. 221 North Main, Eminence. 845-5346. 
Sheffer. Ronald. 1007 Pinebloom. Lexington. 277-0039, 254- 

6610 
Shelton, Benny R., 1616 W. Broadway. Mayfield. 247-6664, 247- 

3061 
Shewcraft, Clifford W., Route No. -2. Calvert City. 395-5421 
Shewmaker. Treffert. 634 Longview Drive, Lexington, 277- 

9117, 256-3816 
Shewmaker. Wayne. 206 W. Meadow Drive, Clarksville, Tenn., 

647-7361, 647-1720 
Shipley. Charles C. 397 Pasadena, Lexington, 278-4939, 252- 

2665 
Shirley, Michael D.. Jr.. 9818 Caven Ave.. Louisville. 969-8801 
Shope. Lowell M.. Box 266. South Webster. 778-2425. 259-2356 
Showalter. John, Georgetown, 863-1892 
Shuck. Thomas G., 2073 Williamsburg, Lexington. 277-8780, 

254-0593 
Simons. Ray. 6824 Bantry Ave.. Cincinnati. Ohio 
Simpson. Fred C. 513 St. Joseph Lane. Park Hills. Coving- 
ton, 431-2531, 681-6150 
Sims, Frank D.. 5303 Regent Way. Louisville. 964-6493. 634- 

1511 ext. 259 
Sims. Tom M.. Route No. 1, Box 268, South Shore, 932-3323 

(Bus.) 
Singleton. L. Bobby. 5711 Omega Street, Louisville, 937-4712, 

937-7750 
Singleton. Ronnie H., 3653 Elderwood Way, Louisville. 363- 

6277, 772-3661 ext. 277 
Sizemore, Aster, Apt. No. 2, Grand Hotel, Hazard, 436-2112, 

436-6361 
Skaggs, Billy C, 900 Appen Ave., Columbia, 384-3014, 384-2165 
Skidmore, Richard Lynn, Route No. 1, Waynesburg, 379-4315 
Sledd, Seldon Dale. 318 Davis Drive, Clarksville, Tenn., 647- 

8597 
Slusher, Wayne C, 407 Byrd St., Covington. 581-5914, 681-5914 
Small, William, Jr.. 1846 Mary Catherine Drive. Louisville, 

448-4859, 684-6308 
Smith, Bill Gene, Elizabethtown Community College, Eliza- 

bethtown 
Smith. David A.. 613 Westover Ave., Richmond 
Smith. James, Heidrick 

Smith, James Gavle, Box 202, Burlington, 586-6048 
Smith, James H.. Route No. 1. Box 437, South Shore, 932-1497 
Smith, Roy M.. Watts 

Smith. Shelby Eugene. Route No. 2. Mt. Vernon. 256-2731 
Smith, Thomas W.. 2916 Sheldon Road, Louisville. 458-3934, 

582-3611 
Smith. Wayne N.. 313 Beechwood Drive. Campbellsville. 165- 

5268. Columbia 384-2751 



Page Six 



THE KENTTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR NOVEMBER, 1966 



Smith, Willard N., 904 Rosecrest Ave., Box 23, CampbeUs- 

vilie, 465-6339, 465-4191 
Smith, William E., 4122 St. Johns Terrace, Cincinnati. Ohio. 

791-3082. 731-2341 ext. 266 
Smith. Winfred Clark, Chavies. 398-7176 (Bus.) 
Smith, Wyatt "Jack". 203 Ohio St., Somerset, 678-4705, 678-8162 
Solomon, Jim, Route No. 3. Benton, 527-8760. 527-2781 
Sosh, La Rue. Box 608. Uniontown, 822-4213, 822-4444 
Sosh, Nelson. Box 608. Uniontown, 822-4212, 822-4200 
South, Douglas E., Box 12, Summit. 862-3255. 765-4177 
Sparks. Bobby, 208 McWhorter, London, 864-6354, 864-2191 
Sparks. Keith E., Jr., 6600 Watch Hill Road, Louisville, 239- 

9093, 366-9511 ext. 273 
Spaulding. Stan. 210 South Market. Waverly. Ohio. 947-4912, 

947-2484 
Speaks. Carl, Stanford 
Speck, Michael E., 205 Sunset Road, Elizabethtown, 765-6385, 

862-1924 
Speer, Zane Grey. Main St., Warfield, 395-5114 
Spencer. Irv. Old State Road, Brandenburg, 422-3294, 937-2100 
Spiceland, S. E.. 305 South 13th St., Murray. 753-2811 
Spoonamore. Jim, 111 Pettus Court, Stanford, 365-2348, 252- 

2250 ext. 3029 
Spradlin. Robert. West Van Lear, 789-4166 
Stanford. Jack. Route No. 1. Jackson 
Staples. Jeiry. 1755 North Green. Henderson, 826-4882, 826- 

9085 
Stark, Owen Douglas. Route No. 2. Bedford, 255-7189 
Starks, James L., P. O. Box 308. Mortons Gap. 258-5342 
Starling. Edward. Williamson High School, Williamson, W. Va. 
Stauffer. Frank, 313yo South Main. Lawrenceburg, 839-6350 
Steenken. William Robert. 1636 Highland Pike, Covington, 

331-3789. 431-3108 
Stephens. Herbert D., 133 First St. West. Ceredo. W. Va. 
Stethen. James E.. Stone St.. Box 134, Bedford, 255-3285 
Stevens. James Lee. Hamby Ave., Dawson Springs, 797-2201, 

Murray 753-1549 
Stiff. Maurice, 2150 Glenworth Ave., Louisville, 454-7808 685- 

2995 
Stikeleather, Clyde L., Box 173, Leitchfield. 269-3885, 259-3161 
Stines, Ray A.. 221 Dorchester, Anchorage. 895-8604, 425-8292 
Stmson. Charles L., Box 335, Horse Cave, 786-2663 
Stith. Houston. 4809 Redstart Road. Louisville 969-9094 
Stoess. Henry L.. Route No. 1, Box 394. Crestwood, 241-4196. 

584-4668 
Stokes. Robert Nelson. 6009 Bardstown Road. Fern Creek. 239- 

0783. 366-1245 
Stokes. Robert K..2725 Hillview Drive, New Albany Ind. 

945-9014. 637-0411 
Stokes. William R.. Route 1. Lewisburg. 726-6729, 726-2441 
Stovall. Terry. Graham. 338-4179 
Stovall, Tom E.. Box 73, Graham, 338-1173 
Strain, Richard P., Box 472, Radcliff, 351-4306, Ft. Knox. 

4-6767 
Strong. Arnett. 116 Kentucky Blvd., Hazard, 436-3938, 436-2141 
Sturgill. Larry, Thealka. 789-4684 
Sullivan, Don Chris. 2083 Old Nassau Road. Lexington, 277- 

6953, Frankfort 664-4806 
Sucietto, Dick. 6572 Gaines Road. Cincinnati. Ohio, 521-7495, 

821-4280 ext. 379 
Sullivan, Dan L.. 307 Ludford. Ludlow. 431-5949, 831-2990 
Sumner, Harold Carl. 2503 Proctor Knott. Louisville, 454-7294, 

895-4226 
Switzer, David Lynn, 142 Westgate Drive. Lexington. 252-8285, 

252-8285 
Switzer, J. Richard, Jr., 3 Circle Drive. Florence, 282-1033, 

581-0168 
Swope, Thomas, 303 Dayton Park, Dayton. 441-6285 
Tackett. Archie. Box 382. Inez, 298-3445 
Tackett. Jay. Route No. 2. Stamping Ground. 535-6G53 
Tackett. Johnny Carmel. Route No. 1. Box 411, Rush. 928-8062 
Tapscott. Ozzie. 158 Mohawk Drive, Paducah. 447-7533. 3-5933 
Tarlton. Thomas. 5608 Rustic Way, Louisville, 969-5637, SP 8- 

0350 
Tarry, William Robert, Route No. 5, Glasgow, 678-2539, 678- 

2539 
Tate, Harold D., 716 Fairview, Ashland, 325-1990, 324-3840 
Taylor, Billy Joe, Route 1, Box 880, Pikeville, 437-4874 
Taylor, Bobby. 618 Main, Williamsburg, 864-4877. 6662 
Taylor, Ed., 435 North 41st St.. Louisville, 772-0126, 459-3400 
Taylor, Frank, 1617 Rosemount, Road, Portsmouth, Ohio, 

353-7174. 363-5143 
Taylor, Jesse, Route No. 2, Box 341, Middlesboro, 248-3953 
Taylor, Norman, 3704 Dena Drive No. 6, Louisville, 367-6994, 

682-5341 
Taylor, Richard, Route No. 1. Williamstown. 824-5800 
Taylor, Ricky D., 22 Bedinger Ave.. Walton. 486-4063, 282-2915 
Tegethoff, Kenneth E.. Route No. 2. Corydon. VA 7-5891 
Terhune, Calvin Truman, 2125 Talisman Drive, Lexington, 

277-8707, 266-3135 
Thomas, Billy Gene, 2333 Quinn Drive, Louisville, 447-2816 
Thomas, Frank M., 6291^ South 44th St., Louisville, 774-2624, 

778-9157 
Thomas, Patrick H., Box 43. Leitchfield, 259-3010, 255-9424 
Thomason, Bennett, Box 92, Bardwell, 628-3160 
Thompson. Houston, 513 East 20th St., Covington, 581-8594. 

261-4425 
Thompson, Jack. 2347 Saratoga Drive, Louisville, 462-9255, 454- 

4585 



Thompson, Kenneth E.. 106 Beacon Hill Drvie, Mt. Orab, 

Ohio. 444-5185. Georgetown. Ohio 378-6236 
Thompson, Ralph. 649 Ivyhill, Cincinnati, Ohio, 922-7319 
Thompson, Thomas Droege. 519 Erlanger Road. Erlanger, 341- 

1809, 331-1551 
Thornton, Bryce C. Berea Blvd., Raceland. 836-4906. 324-5161 
Tinsley. Marion F.. Ash St., Box 447. Central City. 764-3608, 

754-4870 
Todd, Albert, Jr.. 237 Flemingsburg Road. Morehead. 784-7245, 

784-4153 
Todd, Lonnie H., Route No. 2, Madisonville, 821-5028, 821-6862 
Todd. Paul H.. Lily Drive. Lexington. 278-5901 
Tompkins. Chester Bobby, Box 6, Slaughters, 884-3221, 884-7752 
Toy, Donny. Route No. 1, Sharpsburg. 247-.<211. 674-6381 
Travis. Tom. 642 Price Ave., Madisonville, ■S21-1808, 821-1808 
Treadway. Billy. 310 Central Hall, W. Kv. Univ.. Bowling 

Green. Louisville 745-2266. Bowling Glien 895-8917 
Trimer. Norman E.. 1927 Taffeta Drive. Valley Station. 937- 

6672. Ft. Knox 4-8514 
Triplett. Herbert W., Route No. 1. Mt. Sterling 
Troutman. Doyk, Box 304, Harlan, 573-1349 
Tucker. Neal K., 1712 Clarence Drive. Hopkinsville. 885-5492, 

886-4463 
Tuley. Pat. 361 Sharon Drive. Campbellsville, 465-8058. 465-8871 
Turner, Aaron, Smiths Grove, 663-2041 (Bus.) 
Turner. James W.. Garrett, 886-8271 

Tyre. Donaid. 316 Senate Drive, Frankfort, 223-3668. Lexing- 
ton, 254-6610 ext. 36 
Uchtmann. Frank A., Ill Eustace. Fort Thomas. 441-9165 
Urlage, Richard, 822 Highland Av>., Ft. Thomas. 441-5513, 

471-8120 
VanHook. Samuel, Route No. 3. Cynthiana. 234-2336. 234-4393 
Van Meter, Kaye Don, Brownsville, 697-2128, 697-2932 
Vannerson, Duke. Route No. 2, Kevil. 462-6682. 444-9439 
Vanover. J. W.. Jackhorn. 855-7730. 633-2168 
Vanover. Walter S., 1601 M' Auburn Road. Evansville, 423- 

1974, 426-6211 ext. 2] 
Van Sickle, R. John. Fifth St., Uniontown, 822-4774, VA 7- 

9895 
Van Zant. Jim, Box 60r, Williamson. W. Va. 
Varble. William, 1705 Cvpress, Louisville, 776-6712, 772-3621 
Vaughan, Jerry S.. 2516 Thrush Drive, Hopkinsville, 886-7881 
Vaughan. Ronald G., Freeburn. 456-3464, 456-3370 
Vaughn. Teddy Ray, 1905 East 19th, Bowling Green, 842-4687, 

843-8434 
Vaught. William A.. Route No. 4, Box 472, Somerset, 274-3491 
Vermillion. C. D., 1402 Roosevelt, Corbin, 628-2942 
Vescovi. Raymond B.. 3525 Laurel Ave., Evansville, Ind., 

423-8144. 963-3366 
Vest. Thomas, Mize, 726-4436 
Vettiner, Charles. (Colonial Manor. Louisville 
Viars, William Joseph, 109 West 10th St.. Newport, 261-6115 
Vincent. Johnny. 1212 Park St.. Bowling Green, 842-9209 
Vinciguerra, Phillip, Matewan. W. Va. 

Visscher, Robert W.. 3631-B Conroy Ave., Ft. Knox. 4-5769 
Voorhis. Kenneth. 142 Woodmore Ave.. Apt. No. 8, Louisville. 

368-7664. 937-2300 
Vories, Dick. 1211 Wilson Road. Bellevue, 781-1391. 541-0728 
Wagner, Marvin Rudy, Route No. 1. Box 445, Pikeville, 

GE 7-4611, 764-8184 
Waide, Harry D., 250 East Arch, Madisonville, 821-1998, 

821-3870 
Walker, Myron C. 5601 Childs Ave., Cincinnati, Ohio, 662- 

0165, 421-4722 
Walker. Paul R., Reservoir Park, Bowling Green, 843-8893, 

843-3249 
Wallace, Theodore J., 12 Osage Ave., Crestview, 441-3668, 381- 

6900 
Wallen, Howard W., Williamsport, 789-3066, 789-5050 
Waller, Bobbie E., 309 Strathmore, Lexington, 299-6123, 299- 

6123 
Walsh. Bernard N., Box 36, Warsaw, 567-5521, 567-5621 
Walter, Lafayette. 55th Street, Ashland, 324-7686 
Walters. Wayne, Straight Creek 
Ward, Robert, 2040 Washington, Henderson, VA 7-3805, VA 

7-3522 
Warner, Marvin A.. Nancy, 678-4844, 678-4942 
Way, James, 211 W. Penn. Cynthiana, 234-2361, 234-4393 
Wearren. Wade. 4622 Fox Run Road, Louisville, 895-8959, 245- 

0362 
Weathers, Charles J.. 3620 Grand Ave., Louisville, 776-5026 
Weaver, Clyde Ivan, Box 254, Williamson, W. Va. 
Weaver, Ray. 3117 Bernard Drive, So. Ft. Mitchell. 341-2610, 

381-0890 
Weber, Thomas C. 3707 St. Germaine. Louisville. 896-4298 
Weiner, Richard, 8 Poplar Ridge Road, Alexandria, 635-5083. 

821-4280 ext. 327 
Welch. Bill, 1324 Beech, Cincinnati, Ohio, 471-8090, 271-9754 
Welch. Donald G., Route No. 2. Worthville. 732-5575 
Welch, John H., Main Street, Mayking. 633-2928 
Welch. Ronald. Route No. 2, Worthville, 732-5575 
Wells. Glenn, 515 Erlanger Road. Erlanger, 341-0481, 872-5764 
Wells, Milford, Patton Street, Prestonsburg, 886-6101, 886- 

2262 
Wesche, James Allen, 1704 Chickasaw, Lexington, 299-8058 
West, John, Route No. 4. Hickman, 236-3295, 236-2521 
Wetzel, Hugh Donald, 2231 Griffith, Owensboro, 683-4025, 684- 

9419 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR NOVEMBER, 1966 



Page Seven 



Weyer, James G.. 42 Scenic View Drive, Fort Thomas, 781- 

2220, 261-6400 
Whalen, William C, Route No. 1, Maysville, 564-3942, 564-3461 
Wheat, Sonny Buell, 403 North 6th St., Scottsville, 237-3057 
Wheeler, Donald Wayne, Route No. 2, Alvaton, 842-7807, 843- 

3031 
Wheeler, Joe H., Box 8, Ferguson. 679-2903 
Wheeler, Resvie, Route No. 3, Box 173. West Liberty. 522-4496, 

743-3705 
White, David B., 237 Longview Drive, Bowling Green, 843- 

3884, 843-6017 
Whitledge, James C, P. O. Box 125, Clay, 664-2313, Dixon 

639-2651 
Whitley, James R., 208 Cranewood Drive. Trenton, Ohio, 988- 

6740, 771-8200 
Whitt, Hoby, 158 Robin Road. Russell, 836-3576 
Whitt, John, 158 Robin Road, Box 612, Russell. 836-3575 
Whittemore, Paul F.. R. A. 11151909, U. S. Army, Hq, Area 

Command, Spec. Serv., APO 96243, San Francisco, 

Calif. 
Wickham, James Robert, 311 Cathedral Manor, Bardstown, 

348-5282, 833-4612 
Wilcher, Jerry, P. O. Box 12. McKinney, 332-8141, 346-2949 
Wiles, Eddie, Maeeo, 264-1074, 264-9155 

Willett. Art, 217 Valley Road. Danville. 236-7144, 236-9096 
Williams. Benny D., Route No. S, Philpot PA 9-4566 
Williams. Donald. 301 Elm St.. Ravenna, 723-4341, 723-2515 
Williams, Jack A.. 1539 MacArthur Drive, Evansville, Ind., 

476-8876, 424-4201 
Williams. Jack Gary, 387 5th St., Paintsville. 789-4638 
Williams, James H.. Box 587. South Shore. 932-4372. 932-3055 
Williams. Paul W.. Hager Hill. 789-4503. 297-3674 
Williams. Roger. 404 Bond St.. Richmond. 623-3126 
Williams, S. Jack. 323 Steele, Frankfort. 223-5078. 223-0565 
Williamson. Fred, 912 Meadow Lane, Lexington. 254-9433, 252- 

5555 
Wilson, Donald Wayne, Box 51. Livermore. 278-2314 
Wilson. H. G.. 205 N. Maple St.. Somerset, 679-1290, 679-1544 
Wilson, Phillip, Ingle. 871-3291 

Winchester. Roy L.. Bethlehem. Pleasureville 878-4102. New 
Castle 346-8421 

Winfrey. Shelby, 315 Sharon Drive. Campbellsville. 465-8392. 
465-8392 

Wingfield. Felix G.. 1132 Eastirn Parkway. Louisville. 636- 
2282 

Wirtz, Howard, 1324 Hollywood Ave., Cincinnati, Ohio, 681- 

1818, 751-3454 
Wirtz. Leonard F.. 1172 W. Galbraith Road. Cincinnati, Ohio, 

931-1468, 522-7960 

Wise, Billy V., 240 St. Ann Drive, Lexington, 266-7449, 252- 
5494 

Wise, Jack, 209 Pocohontas, Georgetown. 863-3948, 863-1393 
Withrow, Raymond, 424 Res., Central City, 754-1506 
Withrow, Roy D., Route No. 1. Glasgow. 678-2367. 427-2611 
Wolfe, Paul A., 502 Broad, Falmouth, 654-5341, 441-9993 
Wolfe, Roger Dean, 308 N. Mill. London, 864-4207, 873-5248 
Wood, Ellsworth, Route No. 1, Brooksville, 73.5-5438 
Wood, James Randall, 712 Maple Ave., Falmouth, 654-8426. 
581-7700 

Woods, Fairce, Box 247, Jackson, 666-5384, 666-2805 
Woods, Gene B., Route No. 2, Kirksey, 489-3795, Calvert City, 
395-4181 

Woolley, George D.. 2804 Hillcrest, Evansville, Ind., 424-2800, 
423-2254 

Woosley, Travis, Box 524, Calvert City, 395-4667, 395-4133 
Wooton. George B.. 96 South Rosemont. Providence, 667-2932, 
667-2411 

Woprice. Ronald J.. 10706 Milwaukee Way. Valley Station, 

937-7998. 584-1361 ext. 7279 
Wray, Kenneth E.. Route No. 3, Kevil. 224-2867, 488-2491 
Wray, Robert F., 29 Bellee Monte, So, Ft. Mitchell. 331-2594, 

341-4579 

Wright, H. W., Jr., 1434 Hobart, Louisville, 368-2797. 587-1161 
ext. 433 

Wright, James Lloyd, 121 Showalter Drive, Georgetown, 863- 

3628, Lexington, 252-2250 ext. 3280 
Wright. Larry L.. 4415 Bellevue, Louisville, 368-0244, 637-1421 

ext. 205 

Wright, Raleigh F., Broad Bottom 

Wurtz, Emil, 18 East 4th St., Cincinnati, Ohio, 471-0526, 381- 
1232 

Yanoff, Jay Myron, 3702 Stanton Blvd., Louisville, 458-7574 

Yates, Virgil, Dogwood Lane, Fulton, 472-3809, 479-1441 

York, Jim E., 5114 Outer Loop, Louisville, 964-0154, 454-7611 

ext. 4477 
Zachery, Bobby G., 3604 Marlin Drive, Jeffersontown, 267-6217, 

921-9230 

Zlamal, Raymond K.. Cooperstown-Bldg. G.. Lexington, 848- 
5966 



FILMS 

(Continued from inside Front Cover) 
SHOOTING IN BASKETBALL, j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $1.50 

Concentrating on tiie set sliot, tiiis film pictures the 
action of the throw, stance, aim, trajectory, and finger- 
tip control. Special attention is given total body co- 
ordination, especially inward rotation of the hand and 
arm making the throw. 
ST. XAVIER VS. DAVIESS CO. (19581 K. H. S. 

BASKETBALL TOURNAMENT FINALS, e-ys-c-a, 

3 reels, $1.00 

St. Xavier High School of Louisville won the 1958 
State Basketball Tournament by defeating Daviess 
County of Owensboro, 60-49, in the final game of the 
tournament at the University of Kentucky Coliseum. 
THIS IS BASKETBALL, e-j-3-c-a, 3 reels (33 min.), 

Color, $1.00 

Interpretation of play situations goes beyond the let- 
ter of the rule and gives guide lines to better under- 
standing of blocking charging, baskets interference, 
goal tending, screening, and play violations of the free 
throw, jump and boundary lines. 
Gymnastics 
GYMNASTICS, PART I, j-s-c-a, IV2 reels (17 min.), 
$2.50 

Introduces the basic principles of gymnastics and 
follows the routines developed by polished performers 
on the parallel bars, the rope climb, and the long 
horse. Attention is given to the rolls, handstands, and 
handsprings, twists, and somersaults that are basic to 
tumbling. ( Hoefler. ) 

GYIWNASTICS, PART II, j-s-c-a, 11/2 reels (17 min.), 
$2.50 

Introduces the gymnast to the fundamentals of free 
exercise routines. Stresses the importance of smooth 
action as v/ell as strength, form, balance, and ability 
to develop the difficult routines. Demonstrates rings, 
side horse, and the high bar. (Hoefler.) 

Swimming 
BEGINNING SWIMMING, e-j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $1,50 

Through scenes photographed both above and 
beneath the surface of the water, basic techniques of 
swimming for beginners are demonstrated. Land and 
water drills involving kicking, breathing, floating, 
paddling and stroking and pulling with the arm prac- 
ticed separately, then coordinated as the swimmer 
learns the American crawl. The back float, back 
stroke, and breast stroke are also illustrated and ex- 
plained. 

BREAST STROKE, SIDE STROKE, AND UNDER- 
WATER SWIMMING, e-j-s-c-a, $1.50 

This film presents the conventional breast stroke, 
timing the strokes, and the kick. 
CRAWL STROKE, e-j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $1.50 

The basic principles of the stroke are presented 
in this film. The arm stroke, the kick, and the 
breathing are demonstrated. This film also includes 
slow motion shots under water. 
DIVING FUNDAMENTALS, j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $1.50 

After a brief histoiy of the sport of diving, the 
following points are explained and demonstrated: 
the hurdle jump, determining the correct distance, 
proper arm action, correct way of landing on the feet, 
proper takeoff and lift, correct entry into the water. 
The backward dive is also taught, including lift, arch- 
ing the body, and entry into the water. The motion is 
stopped at various points to enable detailed study of 
form. 
DOLPHIN KICK, e-j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $1.50 

An excellent swimmer, an underwater camera and 
carefully devised teaching demonstrations introduce 
the new swimming techniques known as the dolphin or 
(Continued on Page Ten) 



Page Eight 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR NOVEMBER. 1966 



The Flying Dutchman 

Owensboro lost something and Paris gained some- 
thing when Roy Settle left western Kentuclty to be- 
come Executive Vice President of the National Bank 
and Tmst Company of Paris. Roy's contribution to the 
training program of the K. H. S. A. A. is immeasur- 
able. The Calhoun native is one of the best basketball 
officials ever to blow a wWslle in Kentucky and is a 
young man dedicated to community service. Paris is 
lucky. 

Howard Gardner has done a publicity job for sports 
in and around Hardin County which has received na- 
tional recognition. "The Wright Corner" of the Eliza- 
bethtown newspaper was devoted entirely to rules in- 
terpretation on the day of the clinic and drew praise 
from Cliff Fagan, Executive Secretary of the Na- 
tional Federation of State High School Atliletic Asso- 
ciations. Howard collaborated in preparing the stoiy 
which appeared. Incidentally, Buffalo's Pud McLain 
says that Howard Gardner is the best "Frogger" in 
Hardin and LaRue Counties. 

Paid Walker, one of the greatest athletes Glasgow 
has produced since the days of George "BiUy" Pedigo, 
wins the Corn Cob Pipe of Honor for imselfish serv- 
ice. Paul, who is now Bowling Green's recreation di- 
rector, recently persuaded Uncle Sam to give his 
program a $60,000 grant for a 230 acre park and golf 
course. It was Paul Walker again who opened the 
doors of his recreation auditorium for the basketball 
clinic, and Paul again who takes the lead for the 
K. H. S. A. A. in the training of football officials in 
his area. Smoke your pipe, Paul. You've earned it! 

Bardstown now has a full time recreation program 
headed by John Roberts. The offices of the Metro 
Parks and Recreation Department are in the old 
Bardstown High School Gym. John's a product of 
Western Kentucky State University. By the way, East- 
em Kentucky State University now has Jim McChes- 
ney, another Western Kentucky State product, running 
the recreation program there under Dr. Fred Darling. 
The Kentucky Kernel, U. of K.'s student newspaper, 
praised Eastern Kentucky's initiation of the bachelor 
of science degree in recreation program administra- 
tion in an editorial of September 12, 1966. Tcike a bow, 
Fred. You're a "darling" in the recreation field, Dr. 
Darling. 

When out-of-staters tell glowing stories about Ken- 
tucky's hospitality they are not just "Whistlin' Dixie." 
You should follow the Dutchman on his basketball 
clinic trip like Kentucky's Coach Joe Hall does to 
really appreciate the "Red Carpet of Hospitality" 
which covers Kentucky. Washington has its "Hostess 
With the Mostest" but Kentucky has her male coun- 
terpart aU over the Commonwealth. 

It's hard to tell just who is Kentucky's "Host With 
the Most." In Newport it looks like Stan Amzen, but 
as the clinic tour progresses it seems that Bob Laugh- 
lin, Ernie Chattin, James A. Pursifull, Bill Qark, Paul 
Walker and Howard Gardner must surely qualify for 
the honor. So it is that these gentlemen qualify their 
respective areas for the Abou Ben Adhem awards 
which honor those school communities who go that 
"extra mile" to develop good neighborly relationships 
in their regions. 

The Bluegrass State has a number of Kentucldans 
who have become atliletic legends in their own time, 
and one of them is Morehead's Bobby Laughlin. While 
lunching at the Eagle's Nest with Jack Fultz of Olive 
Hill, Bob Wright and the legendary Laughlin, the old 
story was told of the president calUng Bob in to ask 
him to serve temporarily as Morehead's basketball 
coach until a permanent one could be appointed. 




PAUL WALKER 

Laughin agreed. Nine years and a half dozen cham- 
pionships later Laughlin was still serving temporarily. 
This has to be some sort of record for temporary 
coaching assignments. Right now Bobby and his coach- 
ing buddies Bob Wright and Steve Hamilton say that 
Laughlin is the best steak charcoaler In eastern Ken- 
tucl^y. -Ashland's Ernie Chattin says, "Not so; let's 
have a contest with the Dutchman as the judge." 
O. K. here, fellows. You fix 'em and I'll eat 'em. 

Wesleyan's Coach Bob Daniels showed up at Beaver 
Dam and Owensboro for the clinics and expressed his 
sympathy that the Dutchman's 1957 Tiger of the High- 
ways, which was our trademark, had to be replaced 
by a 1966 unpaid-for conveyance. Donnie Schmied and 
Pat Rose missed the Beaver Dam Clinic but Elvis 
HaU was on hand again. Elvis wa^ the first chap in- 
side the door at our first clinic in 1942, and he opened 
the door again in 1963. He's one of our best arbiters. 

Ralph Dorsey of Caverna, a member of the Board 
of Control, more than matches Elvis' record. Not only 
has Ralph been present at all of them since 1942, but 
he often attends three, four and sometimes five ses- 
sions. In the early thirties two youngsters wrote hard- 
wood history at Horse Cave High School. One was 
Ralph Dorsey; the other our genial assistant commis- 
sioner, Joe BUly Mansfield. 

Over in Ashland, Russ Williamson, a former Chair- 
man of the K. H. S. A. A. Board of Control, was the 
"life of the meeting." Here's another Kentuckian who 
is a legend in his own time. It vv'as either Russ or 
Ernie Chattin who told the Dutchman to stop by 
"Luke's" in Louisa for some good mountain sorghum. 
WeU, we couldn't find Luke and we stiU want sor- 
ghum. Can you announce this on your WCMI radio 
program, Ernie, so Luke wiU send it? 

Here are some things which are happening over the 
state: Billy Wise is starting a basketball officials asso- 
ciation in the bluegrass, and a good one is operating 
in western Kentucky, known as the Pennyrile Associa- 
tion — Everybody says that Coach Fairce Woods has 
some fast basketball horses on the Breathitt Coimty 
track — Coach James Morrison of the Kentucky 
School for the Deaf joined official Tommy Thompson 
at the Lexington Qinic; "Scoop" Brown and Johnnie 
Gettler were with them. 

Here's an early season basketball question from Dr. 
Glenn Bonsett, Dean of Men at Hanover College: E>oes 
the new rule pertaining to illegal equipment apply to 
the upper arm? Answer: The forearm is all that is 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR NOVEMBER, 1966 



Nine 



really involved because it is not intended that the ixUe 
apply to the upper arm or to any other parts of the 
body except those mentioned. This means that the 
knee brace with the metal parts is entirely legal un- 
less there is something protruding which would cause 
the officials to rule it harmful. The same philosophy 
applies to guards for the eyeglasses, etc. Always bear 
in mind, however, that if in the opinion of the official 
there is something dangerous about the construction, 
the official has the right to exercise his judgment in 
ruling relative to it. 

Send your news items to The Flying Dutchman, Box 
36, Jeffersontown, Kentucky 40299. 



The High School Coach 

What is a high school coach? He is many things to 
many people. First, he' is a man who lives in a pres- 
sure cooker. 

The pressure comes from trying to compete and 
win. If he doesn't win, the sideline experts produce 
the pressure by making it hot for him. If he does 
win, the pressure builds as more victories are sought. 

He is a man accustomed to late, and sometimes 
cold suppers after a late practice. He is the man who 
comes trudging home late, the wee hours, following a 
long road trip. 

Generally a family man, he is a husband and father 
who sees little of his brood during the season of his 
sport. They don't like his absence and neither does 
he. Somehow, though, the family becomes resigned 
to the fact that dad has a job to do and because of it 
he won't be around much. 

At some juncture in his career, however, he sud- 
denly realizes the wife is getting grey and the kids 
grown up. Where did all those years go to? 

As an athletic coach, the man must be rooted deep- 
ly in the fundamentals of the sport he is trying to 
teach. Beyond that, he must be an amateur psycholo- 
gist, father confessor, a diplomat, and often a baby- 
sitter. 

AH coaches are human, but on occasion are expect- 
ed to be superhuman. He must lead an exemplary life 
off the cou.t or athletic field and always champion 
the cause of good sportsmanship. 

Some coaches thrive on the pressure. Others be- 
come old fast because of it. At the high school level 
the coach is a teacher first and a coach after hours. 

Most schools pay an extra stipend for coaching. But 
a man is not hired just to coach. He must be a quali- 
fied teacher first, instructing in math, chemistry or 
some other academic subject. 

He may be a top-notch teacher with a so-so coach- 
ing record, but it is the latter he hears most about 
because his teams are always on display, good or 
bad. 

Some fellow faculty members may hold him in con- 
tempt, but he soon comes to understand this is the 
price he pays for occasionally having a team good 
enough to get the headlines or attract attention of the 
public. 

The coach discovers early that athletic fame is 
fleeting. Last year's championship doesn't count when 
a new season rolls around. This, too, must be impart- 
ed to his athletes. And how do you go about telling a 
boy that the trophies of yesterday are already tar- 
nished? 

A bleak job? To some extent, yes. But there are 
rewards in coaching. Helping to develop boys is the 
basic challenge and worthy of the best a man has to 
offer. 

While winning the next game is the immediate goal, 
the real satisfaction for a coaoh doesn't come until 



later— when the athlete", are out on their own. 

When an ex-athlete remembers something his old 
high school coach said or did and this helps him along 
the way, the pressure, long hours, and cold suppers 
have paid off. 

This is a high school coach. 

— WIAA BULLETIN 



FOOTBALL QUESTIONS 

(Continued from Page One) 
Ruling: If, before the ball is in the air, Al fakes a 
block on Bl, or Al is between Bl and the ball, or Al is 
attempting to block Bl, Bl may use his hands on Al 
without penalty. Bl, in fact, could block Al before the 
baU was in the air without penalty. If the ball is in the 
air, Bl may not use his hands nor may he block. If 
the contact between Al and Bl is made by both players 
attempting to legitimately olay the ball, and both are 
making a simultaneous and bona fide effort to get to 
it, there probably was no interference involved. 

28. Play: 3rd and 8 on K's 25 yardline. Punt by Kl 
is blocked by R in the line-of-scrimmage and is recov- 
ered by K on its 20 yardline. 

Ruling: 4th down, 13 for K. 

29. Play: As a time-out charged to Team A expires, 
Al or Bl discovers it is necessary to repair his equip- 
ment and that, in order to do so, the assistance of a 
team attendance will be required. 

Ruling: The player requiring the equipment repair 
must be removed from the game. When a player re- 
ceives the assistance of a team attendant, a time-out 
must be charged and in this situation, neither team can 
immediately secure another charged time-out. 

30. Play: Al throws a legal forward pass which 
crosses the line-of-scrimmage. The pass is thrown in 
the vicinity of the sideline to the right of Team A. A6 
or B7 interferes inbounds with an opponent near the 
sideline to the left of Team A. 

Ruling: Pass interference. The rules coverage for 
forward pass interference does not refer in any way to 
the relative position of the ball or the players excepting 
that interference can occur only beyond the line. 

31. Play: 1st and 10 for Team A on B's 18 yardline. 
After the ball has been placed ready-for-play but before 
the series of downs has started. Team B is penaUzed for 
unsportsmanlike conduct. 

Ruling: 1st and 1 for Team A. In theory, the line-to- 
gain is established as soon as a new series of downs 
is declared. The line-to-gain was, therefore, B's 8 
yardline. The penalty of half the distance to the goal 
placed the ball on B's 9 yardline with 1 yard remsiin- 
ing in order to make a 1st down, hence 1st and 1. 

32. Play: Team A backfield player holds ball in one 
hand and bats ball forward with other. 

Ruling: Forward pass. 

Comment: By definition, this act is a fumble. By 
interpretation, a fumble going forward is disregarded 
as to its direction unless the act is ruled intentional. In 
intentional situations, the fumble is a forward pass. 
Since the ball is held and then batted, there is no ques- 
tion about the action being intentional. 

33. Play: What is the procedure for stopping the 
clock for an official's time-out following: (a) a change 
of possession; or (b) a declared 1st down. 

Ruling: The act itself in both (a) and (b) causes the 
designated official to stop the clock. In (a) when the 
ball becomes dead following a change of possession, the 
covering official immediately gives the dead ball signal 
and indicates the direction of play. His signal for time- 
out follows immediately. Then the succeeding spot is 
established, the down box is placed and the chain crew 
is instructed to move the stakes. After the down box 
has been set, the referee declares the ball ready-for- 
play and he starts the clock immediately. It is not 



i^aL'e len 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR NOVEMBER. 1966 



necessary to have the chain stakes reset before start- 
ing the clock. 

Only the referee is permitted to declare a 1st down. 
In ( b I the referee will declare a 1st down after the line 
to-gain has been reached, and then signal the clock to 
be stopped when the succeeding spot is established. In 
event of a long run or a successful long pass, the 
referee must be in the proximity of the ball (2 or 3 
steps from it) before declaring a 1st down. When the 
succeeding spot is established, the chain crew will be 
immediately instructed to establish the new line-to- 
gain. After the box has been set, the referee will de- 
clare the ball ready-for-play and start the clock. 

The purpose of stopping the clock in these two situa- 
tions is to maintain consistenc.y in administration both 
throughout a given game, and by all crews. The clock 
stoppage is not at all for the purpose of permitting a 
chain crew to be dilatory nor to permit a leisurely re- 
placement of players by substitutes. Good administra- 
tion requires that no time be wasted in either situa- 
tion. Referees must not wait for substitutions to be 
completed following a change of possession before 
starting the clock. 

It has been clearly established that the average in- 
crease in playing time of a game this season is be- 
tween 6^2 and 8 minutes when the administration is 
efficient. Obviously, the rule makes for a minimal in- 
crease in playing time. The increase varies, but an 
average has been established. If the games are con- 
sistently more than 7 or 8 minutes longer than they 
were last year, there is reason to believe that the 
crews lack desired efficiency. If the average length ol 
playing time increase is less than 4 minutes, it may be 
the officials are using the rule to accommodate them- 
seh'es. Perhaps they are keeping the clock imnning 
when the rules specify othei-wise. Research has indi- 
cated that the clock will be stopped on an average of 
from 9 to 10 seconds when a 1st down is declared, and 
from 10 to 12 seconds when there is a change of pos- 
session. 

There are approximately 40 of these clock stoppages 
during the average game. The approximate increased 
length of time can be easily computed on the basis of 
this experience. Rumors that .games are consistently 
increased in playing time from 15 to 25 minutes are 
clearly indicative of a misapplication of the rule or a 
lack of efficient administration. 



FILMS 

(Continued from Page Seven) 

fishtail kick. Analyzing the body movements used in 
the dolphin kick, the film stresses the importance ol 
practice for mastery of this efficient speedy kick. 
I'iVI NO FOOL IN WATER, p-e-j-a, 1 reel (8 min.) 
color, $3.00 

Jiminy Cricket illustrates the "do's" and "don'ts" 
of water safety precautions. Points out the basic rules: 
wait at least two hours after eating, stay out when 
water is too cold, never swim alone, and dive only 
when you know the water is deep enough. 

SWIIVI AND LIVE, j-s-c-a, 2 reels, $1.00 

Men of the Army Air Force at Miami arc taught 
to swim from floating to swimming through burning 
oil. The film is useful for pre-induction instruction and 
for safety classes as weU as for general programs. 

Track 

THE BROAD JUMP, j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $1.50 

Controlled speed-timing and coordination — develop- 
ment of legs and torso — mobility of pelvis and hips, 
one. two, three style — footroll — single and triple air 



stride — soft versus hard take off— arm position. 
DISCUS, i-s-c-a, 1 reel, $1.50 

Principle of centrifugal force — ^muscle development 
for side arm throw — grips— finger roU — heel of thum.b 
pressure — finger exercise — clockwise spin — hip snap — 
reverse and non-reverse stvles. 
DISTANCE RACES, s-c-a, 1 reel, $1.50 

Races from 1,000 to 10,000 meters and steeple chase 
are demonstrated. Style of distance runner is contrast- 
ed with that of dash man. Difference in typical 
physiques are shown. Slow motion photography is 
used to analyze movements. 

DISTANCES, j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $1.50 

S t y 1 e — developing stamina — calisthenics — avoiding 
shin splint — controlled tension — forward knee reflex — 
straight line running — automatic stride. 

THE HIGH JUMP, j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $1.50 

Belly roll or straddle and improved Western style- 
body lean and reverse — approach — body tension — coor- 
dination of arm and leg action. 

THE HURDLES, j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $1.50 

Basic hurdling styles — rear hip and leg action — 
rhythmic running— hurdhng, calisthenics — body balance 
— correct clearance — circular stepover action — adapt- 
ing styles of physiques. 

THE JAVELIN, j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $1.50 

Four stage catapult throw — preliminary run — con- 
cluding stride — throwing stance — throwing and reverse 
— alternative hand and finger grips — ^facing position- 
balance of stomach and back muscle tension — throw- 
ing angle — body and leg coordination drills — flexibility 
exercises. 

JUMPS AND POLE VAULT, s-c-a, 1 reel, $1.50 

Demonstrations from actual competition are shown 
for running high-jump; running broad-jump; hop, step 
and jump; and pole vault. Slow motion photography is 
used for detailed study of form. 

MIDDLE DISTANCES, j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $1.50 

Sprinting techniques — ball of foot running — auto- 
matic stride — pendulum and bicycle stride — exercise — 
counterbalanced arm action — push drive — jockeying for 
position. 
POLE VAULT, j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $1.50 

Basic vaulting principles — importance of exercises 
— running action— grip — selecting the pole — take-off- 
Western and Eastern style — slotting — novice training. 
THE RELAYS, j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $1.50 

Passing — visual pass — blind pass — right and left ex- 
change — merging of runners speed — baton grips— relay 
starts, underhand action — cup style— overhead sprint 
pass — fly scoop — practice and team work. 
THE SPRINTS, j-s-c-a, 2 reels, $2.50 

Fundamentals of 100 yard and 200 yard dash-impact 
style and natural stretch stride-synchronizing leg and 
arm action — conditioning exercises — starting tech- 
niques — slow motion of muscular utilization and coor- 
dination. 
SHOT PUT, j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $1.50 

Fitting styles to physiques — tension control — one, 
two, three rhythm — exercises — finger and hand grip — 
finger and wrist snap — ^foot positions — ^progressive ten- 
sion and effort — explosive hip snap. 
THIS IS TRACK AND FIELD, e-j-s-c-a, 3 reels, color, 
$1.00 

Uses the Olympic motto "Citius-Altius-Fortius," 
"Swifter-Higher-Stronger" to introduce a variety of 
track and field situations. Helps officials, coaches, 
participants and fans to better understand the basic 
rules of running, jumping, vaulting and throv\'ing. 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR NOVEMBER, 1966 



Paee Eleven 



Minutes of Board Meeting 

(Continued from Page Three) 

(Cynthiana), Edgar McNabb (So. Ft. Mitchell) 

Wrestling— Chairman Orville Williams (Seneca), Will 
D. Evcins (Ky. School for the Blind), Don R. Rawlings 
(Danville), Jerry Abney (Alexandria) 

Gymnastics — Chairman Bernard Johnson (Lexing- 
ton), Bob Wason (Louisville), Herb Lewis (Louisville), 
Dr. Barney Groves (Richmond), Thomas E. Mahanes 
(Lexington) 

There was a discussion concerning certain needed 
changes in the Football Playoffs regulations. 

The Commissioner recommended that, for the foot- 
ball seasons of 1967 and 196S, 475 be substituted for 
421 in ItA-2 and I-A-3; that I-C be amended accord- 
ingly, with enrollments based on the 1965-66 figures. 
He asked Assistant Commissioner Mansfield to present 
the recommended classes, districts, and regions for 
1967 and 1968, based on the enrollment figure men- 
tioned. Foster J. Sanders moved, seconded by Morton 
Combs, that the recommendations of the Commissioner 
and the Assistant Commissioner be accepted and made 
a part of the football regulations. The motion was 
carried unanimously. 

The Commissioner and the Assistant Commissioner 
recommended the following additional changes in the 
Football Playoffs regulations: 

"Substitute the following for II-C, designating this as 
II-B: 'To qualify for a district championship, a team 
shall play a minimum of four games in its class with- 
in the district. If the principal is unable to schedule 
this minimum within the district, then games played 
with other teams in the same class wUl be used in 
determining the team's rating.' 

"Amend II-B, designating it as II-C, to read as fol- 
lows: 'The championship of a district, or a region, if 
there are no districts, will be determined by the Dick- 
inson Rating System, as adopted by the Board of Con- 
trol. In event of a tie under the Dickinson System the 
following plan will be applied for breaking the tie: 
for winning a game, ten points; for tying a game, 
five points; for each game won by a defeated oppo- 
nent, one point; for each game won by a tied oppo- 
nent, one-half point; for each game tied by a defeat- 
ed opponent, one-half point; for each game tied by a 
tied opponent, one-fourth point. If a tie results after a 
team's highest points for four games played within its 
class have been counted, an additional game will be 
counted until the tie is broken. The order of games 
counted to break this tie shall be as follows: games 
within the class, games in other classes. If a tie still 
results, it shall be broken by the Board of Control.' " 

Oran C. Teater moved, seconded by Don R. Raw- 
lings, that the recommended changes in the Football 
Playoff regulations, recommended by the Conmiission- 
er and the Assistant Commissioner, be accepted by the 
Board and made a part of the regulations. The motion 
was carried unanimously. 

The Commissioner reported a recommendation of 
the State Gymnastics Committee, to the effect that a 
State Gymnastics Meet for Girls be held during the 
current school year, in addition to the State Gym- 
nastics Meet for Boys, previously planned. Ralph C. 
Dorsey moved, seconded by Foster J. Sanders, that 
the recommendation of the State Gymnastics Commit- 
tee be approved if' enough interest in this sport can 
be secured to justify the meet. The motion was car- 
ried unanimously. 

The Commissioner reported on certain correspond- 
ence with Senators Cooper and Morton, and with Ken- 
tucky members of the House of Representatives, con- 
cerning proposed legislation dealing with the problem 
of professional football games being telecast on Friday 



nights during the early part of the high school foot- 
ball season; and efforts being made by the National 
Federation and the various state athletic and activi- 
ties associations to sponsor or amend forthcoming leg- 
islation attempting to protect the high schools in the 
nation maintaining football from this encroachment on 
the part of professional football. Several members of 
the Board, who had received from the Commissioner 
previous information concerning the problem men- 
tioned and who had written to their representatives in 
Washington, reported on the favorable letters which 
they had received in reply. 

Oran C. Teater moved, seconded by Ralph C. Dor- 
sey, that the nex-t meeting of the Board be held in 
Lexington on December 23, 1966. The motion was car- 
ried unanimously. 

Foster J. Sanders moved, seconded by Don R. Raw- 
lings, that all bills of the Association beginning July 
1, 1966, and ending September 30, 1966, by allowed. 
The motion carried unanimously. 

There being no further business, the meeting ad- 
journed. 



A Code of Ethics 

The West Virginia Coaches Association in its March 
(1966) meeting adopted a Code of Ethics as proposed 
by the Coaches' Committee of the National Education 
Association. The Code is as follows: 

1. I will by word and deed serve as a worthy 
example of behavior and leadership for players, exem- 
plifying the highest moral character and gentlemanly 
action. 

2. I will strive to win but will be modest in victory 
and gracious and sympathetic in defeat. 

3. I will integrate my personal philosophy of athlet- 
ics with the philosophy of education advocated by the 
school. 

4. I will demonstrate mastery of the principles of 
coaching and of the sports I am teaching, seeking to 
learn more about the game through study and attend- 
ance at clinics and schools. 

5. I v/ill make my work an integral part of the 
educational contribution of the school. 

6. I will respect the integrity and personality of 
every player, being fair to each through consideration 
of individual differences, needs, interests, tempera- 
ments, aptitudes, and backgrounds. 

7. I v/ill insist upon the highest possible standards 
of conduct, scholarship, and conditioning and will en- 
force local and state rules of eligibility. 

8. I will consider most important the physical and 
mental health and well-being of athletes and wiU 
establish and enforce sound training rules. 

9. I will seek to inculcate good habits of healthful 
living by providing a hygienic and safe environment 
for physical activity and by teaching the values of 
proper diet, sleep, rest, activity, and cleanliness. 

1(). I will stress the real values of athletics and 
eliminate the "win or else" attitude, developing the 
love of the respect for sports. 

11. I will emphasize the ideals of sportsmans'hip 
and fair play; develop self-control and respect for 
wise discipline and authority; and strive to build 
qualities of cooperation, courage, and goodwill. 

12. I will encourage leadership, use of initiative 
and good judgment, freedom of thought and action, in 
the true spirit of democracy. 

13. I will be a perfect host to visiting teams, coach- 
es, and officials, treating my opponents as guests in 
my home. 

14. I will respect the integrity, honesty, and judg- 
ment of sports officials; will present a worthy exam- 



Page Twelve 



THE KENTUCKY fflGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR NOVEMBER, 1966 



SOUTHLAND SPORT SHOP 

348 Southland Dr. Lexington, Ky. 

In Stock For Immediate Delivery by U.P.S. 

J. A. McFadden, School Rep. 

649 Northside Dr. 

Lexington, Ky. 

Phone 299-1635 

All Star Cotton Socks— Sized 10, 11, 12, 13 $ 4.50 doz. 

Riddell White Helmets— (We install bars) $18.95 

Coat Style (Finger Tip) Jackets $14.95 

RSS' & Jet Basketballs, Converse Shoes — Call us for quantity 

prices 

Derma (Insta) Heat Case $10.95 

Trophies in stock at all prices — ^We engrave at our store 
Sweat Shirts — ^We print our own at store, 3-4 week service, 

36 minimum $ 1.95 ea. 

Coat Style Sweaters $12.95 & $13.95 

V-Neck White Sweaters $ 8.25 & up 

6" Chenille Letters (Plain), 2 weeks $ 1.35 ea. 

J & J Speed Pack Tape $17.95 

Cramer Trainers Supplies 

110 lb. Plastic Coated Barbells $19.88 

SOUTHLAND SPORT SHOP 

Gene Stokley 277-3977 Dick WaUace 



pie of emotional stability and control no matter what 
the decision or score; and wiU level protests only 
through regular and approved channels. 

15. I will safeguard the school athletic program, 
the public, and the profession from commercial in- 
fringement by vested interests and from individuals or 
groups who might degrade or subvert athletics and 
coaching. 

16. I will, in all aspects of my responsibilities as a 
coach, abide by the rules of the game, in letter and in 
spirit, that I may be a credit to the education profes- 
sion and the coaching profession. 



New From AAHPER 

TENNIS-BADMINTON GUIDE 1966-68 

Here is the latest revised guide to two of the na- 
tion's most popular games — tennis and badminton. 
Official rules and regulations are included, along with 
selected references and visual aids. A series of arti- 
cles by prominent spokesmen on the two sports are 
geared to improve game strategy, technique cUid 
skills. Topics presented include practice pattern im- 
provement, elements of form, speed testing, teaching 
and officiating tips and techniques, and purchase and 
care of equipment. 
144 pp. (243-07242) $1.00 

ARCHERY-RIDING GUIDE 1966-68 

A wealth of information on archery and riding is 
featured in this new guide, including 26 articles by 
authorities in the two sports. Articles on archery deal 
with such things as: The Appeal of Field Archery, 
Novelty Events, Schoolyard Field Archery, Archery 
for the Very Young Set, An Aiming Device for Teach- 
ing Archery to the Blind, The Archery Caddy, Solving 
Equipment Problems, Clout Shooting and Archery 



Golf. Also included are announcements of upcoming 
tournaments. Topics of riding articles include: West- 
ern Riding Today, What Should We Teach, The Teach- 
er's Challenge: To Combine Fun Euid Discipline, Sug- 
gestions for the Selection of Horses, and Summer 
Camp Riding. 

128 pp. (243-07232) $1.00 

1966 EDITIONS OF DGWS GUIDES 

Three new editions of the popular DGWS sports 
guides are now available from AAHPER: 

BASKETBALL GUIDE 1966-67 
106 pp. (243-07234) $1.00 

SOCCER-SPEEDBALL GUIDE 1966-68 
128 pp. (243-07240) $1.00 

FIELD HOCKEY-LACROSSE GUIDE 1966-68 
128 pp. (243-07238) $1.00 

Each contains official rules, officiating techniques, 
officers and committees, plus articles on teaching sug- 
gestions and programing for the sports covered. 
BASKETBALL RULES REPRINT 

This is a separate publication containing only the 
rules section of the DGWS Basketball Guide is also 
available. 
48 pp. (243-07236) $.35 

DISCOUNTS on quantity lots of the same book: 2-9 
copies, 10%; 10 or more, 20%. If you wish to order 
copies, please write to NEA PubUcations-Sales, 1201 
Sixteenth Street, N. W., Washington, D. C. 20036. 

Important: 

1. Make checks payable to National Education / 
sociation. 

2. No C. O. D.'s. 

3. Shipping and handling charges are added to all 
billed orders. 

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SWEATERS IN STOCK 

No. CBC heavy weight worsted cotton back coat style sweater. 
Colors: White, royal, black and scarlet 
Sizes : 32, 34, 36, 38, 40, 42, 44, 46. 

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No. BSC 100% heavy weight pure worsted, 3 ply, coat style sweater. 
Colors: White, royal, black and scarlet. 
Sizes: 32, 34, 36, 38, 40, 42, 44, 46. 

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No. MBC medium weight pure worsted, 2 ply coat sweater. This Is a Kiddie 
style and is just the thing for your mascot, or child. 
Colors: Scarlet, royal and white 
Sizes: 6, 8, 10 and 12. 

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No. MBRB V-neck, medium heavy weight worsted pull-over for cheerleaders. 
Colors: White, black, kelly, Lt. gold. Old gold, royal, scarlet, 
Columbia Blue. 
Sizes: 32, 34, 36, 38, 40, 42, 44, 46. 

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CLASS AA STATE CHAMPION HOPKINSVILLE 







1! 



(Left to Rigrht) Front Row : Robert Redd. George Kendrick. Hap Higgins, Mike Warren. Stuart Cole- 
man, Mike HutcHens Joe McCoUum. Howard Myers. Ben Fletcher. Chris Brockman, Bruce Joiner. Mike 
Haney. Chuck Henderson. Second Row: Skipper Eckles. Mike Reid, Mike Brown. Jackie Richardson, 
Darrell Halcomb. Rob Embry, Mickey Fowler, Ted Hayes, James Bealmer, Louis Osborne, Ken Bates, 
John Kershaw, Jodia Morehead, Cleveland Sebree. Third Row: Ron Carthean, Robert Law, Frank Chris- 
topher. Bruce Thomas, Tyron Davie, Jesse Green. Bobby Adams. Bill Snider. Dale PoUey, John Fuqaa. 
Gerald Thomas, Ray Mabry, D wight Chaney, Ken Hatzakorzian, Robert Hargrove, Ray Joiner, M'ke 
Lewis. Henry Parker, Lawrence Brame, Mgr. Gary Ebling. Tom Stevenson. Fourth Row: Robert Radford. 
Sam Adams. Tom Moehlman. Jim Hanratty. Bob Thorpe, Steve Dalton, Don McNeil, Glenn Tillman, 
Ricky Deason. Larry Wolfe, Bobby Latham, Doc Johnson, Charles Peden, Edward Combs, Doug Smith, 
Johnny Wright- 



i^ 

1 



Hopkinsville 36-Henderson 19 
Hopkinsville .g^-Bath County 
Hopkinsville 14-Clarksville 
Hopkinsville 20-Paducah Tilghman 6 
Hopkinsville 34-MadisonviIle 6 



Hopkinsville 41-Mayfield 
Hopkinsville 27-Ca1dwell County 20 
Hopkinsville 16-Murray 6 
Hopkinsville 42-Bow mg Green 7 
Hopkinsville 20-Franklin Simpson 12 
Hopkinsville 27-Henderson County 12 



Playoffs 

Hopkinsville 35-Henry Clay 
Hopkinsville 28-Highlands 6 



Official Organ of tlie 

KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION 



December, 1966 



in 



THE TRINITY HIGH SCHOOL CROSS COUNTRY TEAM 




(Left to Right) Front Row: Don Kelty. Ken Eilers. Denny Pohl, Stan Voelker. Second Row: 
Dick Bealbear, David Daring, John Blum. Coach Ken Combs. 



Coach 



The 1966 Cross Country 

The Louisville Trinity High School and Darrell Re- 
mole of t±ie CKvensboro High School posted their third 
consecutive state cross country titles on November 5. 
The Bellarmine College of LouisviUe was host to the 
fourteenth K.H.S.A.A. Cross Country run, with Ath. 
Dir. Eddie Weber of Bellarmine being meet manager. 

The Shamrocks placed tvvo runners in the top five 
positions, and had an over-all total of 60 points. 
Remote was clocked at 10:08.4 for the hvo-mile course 
through Seneca Park in snowy conditions. The St. 
Xa\der team was second with 103 points, followed 
closeh by Louisville DeSales mth 109. 

Scores of the first ten teams were as follows: Trin- 
itjs 60; St. Xavier, 103; DeSales, 109; Greensburg. 
123; Newport Catholic, 201; Paducah Tilghman, 212; 
Owensboro, 283; Somerset, 303; Lexington Catholic, 
312; EUzabethtown, 341. 

Ten regional runs had been held for the purpose of 
qualifying teams and individuals for the state event. 
These runs were held at Paducah, Bowling Green, 
Bardstown, Clarkson, Louisville (2), BeUevue, Lexing- 
ton, Somerset and PaintsviUe. In addition to the 
teams, several individual runners qualified as entrants 
for the state affair. 

The order in which the first fifty runners finished is 
given below, including the times of the first twenty. 

1-Darrell Remole, Owensboro (10:08.4); 2-Phil Theis, 
Westport (10:32.2); 3-Steve Keller, Lexington Catholic 



(10:41.2); 4-Denny Pohl, Trinity (10:48.0); 5-Ken 
Eilers, Trinity (10:50.0); 6-Larry Bloyd, Greensburg 
(10:55.0); 7-Don Kelty, Trinity (11:01.0); 8-Dave Dar- 
ing, Trinity (11:02.0); 9-Melvin Irvin, DeSales, 
(11:04.0); 10-Ken Munninghoff, Newport Catholic 
(11:11.0); 11-Rick James, St. Xavier (11:11.0); 12-James 
Banks, M.M.I. (11:11.0); 13-Tom Recktenwald, De- 
Sales (11:11.0); 14-Ricky Roberts, St. Xavier (11:12.0); 
15-Ruel Elldns, Greensburg (11:14.0); 16-Don Weber, 
Bishop David (11:15.0); 17-Ron Nieporte, Newport 
Catholic (11:18.0); IS-Tim Harry, DeSales (11:19.0); 
19-Ron Whitesides, Paducah Tilghman (11:21.0); 
20-Hermes Lee, Paducah Tilghman (11:21.0); 21-Jaek 
Parsons, St. Xavier; 22-Steve Daffron, Monticello; 23- 
Jaclde Rose, Greensburg; 24-John Porter, Owensboro; 
25-Paul Upchurch, Monticello; 26-Paul Cox, Somerset; 
27-Ru3sell Harris, EUzabethtown; 28-Mike Allen, St. 
Xavier; 29-Gary' Willis, St. Xavier; 30-Anibal Rivera, 
Fort Kno.x; 31-Randy Hancock, Lexington (Catholic; 
32-David Baumer, Durrett; 33-Ron Green, DeSales; 
34-Gordon Loomis, Holmes; 35-Larry Kays, St. Xavier; 
36-Stan Voelker, Trinity; 37-James Milby, Greensburg; 
38-John McGuire, Johns Creek; 39-John Wikoff, Iro- 
quois; 40-^Steve Bailey, Butler; 41-Steve Hamric, 
Owensboro; 42-Robert Coffey, Greensburg; 43-RonaId 
Blevins, Flat Gap; 44-David Twyman, LaRue County; 
45-Bruce Schuhnan, Paducah Tilghman; 46-Marty 
Elder, DeSales; 47-Sam Thompson, Greensburg; 48-Don 
Munninghoff, Newport Catholic; 49-'Billy Faith, Daviess 
County; 50-Ronnie Mays, Tales Creek. 



The Kentucky High School Athlete 

Official Organ of the 
Kentucky High School Athletic Association 



VOL. XXIX— NO. 5 



DECEMBER, 1966 



Sl.Ori Per Year 



f 



Kentucky Gymnastics 

The principals of some twelve schools 
have indicated that they will send Gymnas- 
tics teams to the forthcoming First Annual 
State Championship Gymnastics Meet, 
scheduled to be held at the University of 
Louisville on April 1, 1967. It is hoped that 
by the time of the State meet many addi- 
tional schools will have entries. It is not 
necessary that a full team be entered in the 
state affair. 

On November 19, 1966, during the 
KAHPER Fall Conference held at Lexing- 
ton, Chairman Bernard Johnson of the 
K.H.S.A.A. Gymnastics Committee conduct- 
ed a clinic, the topic of which was "Prepara- 
tion for a State Gymnastics Meet." 

By the time this issue of the ATHLETE 
comes from the press, the Kentucky All 
Gymnastics Day, scheduled for December 
10, will have been held. The program was 
sponsored jointly by the University of Ken- 
tucky, Georgetown College, and Eastern 
Kentucky University. The themp v/as Com- 
position of Competitive Routines for all 
National Gymnastics Events. Instructions 
were given on how. to organize high school 
and college Gymnastics exhibitions. 

University of Louisville, on January 14, 
1967, will conduct its Second Annual Invita- 
tional Gvmnastics Meet. In its first vear 
the University of Louisville Invitational 
was extremely successful. Over 250 grade 
school, high school and colleo-e gvmnasts 
from five states took part in this event. The 
senior men's division was bv far the larerest 
group and the level of comnetition was very 
good. Several strong college teams took oart 
as well as manv outstandinor his-h school 
gymnasts. The Second Annual U. of L. Invi- 
tational is exoected to be much larger and 
include several new high school and college 
teams from the State of Kentucky. Early 
estimates indicate that teams from as far 
away as Texas, Virginia. Michip-an. Alabama 
and Louisiana will join the ranks in attend- 
ance at this meet, bringino- the number of 
states represented to ten. Total number of 
gvmnasts taking Dart in this second invita- 
tional meet is estim.ated to be 350. Over 200 
gymnasts from orade schools, high schools 
and colleges in Kentucky will take part in 
this event. This meet is open to all interest- 




U. of L.'s Captain Dan Moreno 

ed individuals or teams and is designed to 
acquaint the people of Kentucky with the 
sport of competitive gymnastics. There are 
four divisions: Boys and Girls, Junior High 
and under; Men and Women, High School 
and up. Awards will be given for the first 
six places in all events, and team and run- 
ner-up trophies for all divisions. .Additional 
information can be obtained from Mr. Rob- 
ert Wason, Gymnastics Coach at the Uni- 
versity of Louisville, Louisville 8, Ken- 
tucky. 

Gymnastics coaches who are unable to se- 
cure Gymnastics wear (uniforms, warm-ups, 
palm guards, and slippers) from sporting 
goods companies or other regular suppliers 
are advised that a large inventory of gar- 
ments and personal items is kept in stock 
at the Universitv of Louisville, and the 
items are available for immediate purchase 
through the U.L. Gymnastics team. Coach 
Wflson may be contacted for additional in- 
formation. 



Page Two 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR DECEMBER, 19tJ6 



DECEMBER. 1966 



VOL. XXIX— NO. 5 



Published monthly, except Jane and July, by the Kentucky 

High School Athletic Association 

Office of Publication, Lexin^on. Ey. 46501 

Second class postage paid at Lexingrton. Kentucky. 

Editor THEO. A. SANFORD 

Assistant Editor J. B. MANSFIELD 

Lexingrton, Ky. 
BOARD OF CONTROL 

President Sherman Gish (1963-67). Greenville 

Vico-President Don Davis (1963-67), Independence 

Directors — Morton Combs (1964-68), Carr Creek: Ralph C. 
Dorsey (19SS-7S) , Horse Cavo; Preston Holland (1965-69), 
Murray; Don R. Rawlings (1965-69), Danville; Foster J. 
Sandors (1966-70), Louisville; Oran C. Tester (1964-68). 
Paintsville. 

Subscription Rate $1.90 Per Year 



^lom the Commissioned s (Jffi 



ice 



REPORTS PAST DUE 

1. 1966 Football Participation List 

2. School's Report on Football Officials 

3. Official's Report on Schools (Football) 



Delegate Assembly Members 

Members of the Delegate Assembly at the forthcom- 
hig 1967 annual meeting of the Association were 
elected by the principals of K.H.S.A.A. member 
schools on ballots returned to the State Office before 
November 15. There were several ties in the voting 
for delegate and alternate. These ties were broken 
recently, with the delegates and alternates determined 
by lot. The names of the district representatives are 
as follows: 

Delegates 

(1) 0. J. Mitchell. (2) Richard Winebarger, (3) 
James Baker, (4.) Bill Cothran, (5) Joe W. Clark, (6J 
Ivan Russell, (7) Robert B. Fox, (8) Frank B. Simp- 
son, (91 L. D. Knight. (lOJ Lyle C. Baugh, (U), V. M. 
Vibbert, (12) Cecil Goil, (13) R. D. Reynolds, (14), 
Gilbert Richardson. (15) Zeb Ricketts, (16) Prentiss 
Stanford, (17) Kenneth Riddle, (18) Corky Cox, (19) 
Brotlier Howard, (20) Don Shaw, (21) J. C. Cantrell, 
(22) J. Waymon Hackett. (23) Rev. Fr. Phelan, (25) 
Foster J. Sanders, (26) V. M. Brucchieri, (27) W. K. 
Niman, (29) L. W. Mullins, (30) Roy Winchester, (31) 
James C. Wilson, (32i Leo Brewsaugh, (33) BUI Per- 
ry, (34) George N. Schneider, (35) Frank Lyons, (36) 
Robert Dozier, l37i Paul E. Patrick, (38) Larry Ste- 
phenson, (39) Teddy Applegate, (40) Letcher Norton, 
(41) Charles Dawson, (42) Henry Frazier, (43) Clyde 
Lassiter, (44) Philip Cox, (45) Johnnie Ray LasweU, 
(46) Joe W. Harper. (47) Hobert R. Thompson, (48) 
Lynn Sasser. (49) Preston Parrott, (50) (jharles Sin- 
gleton, (51) Wayland Jones. (52) George Francis, (53) 
Henry E. Wright, (54) P. P. Estridge, (55) J. B. Goff, 
(56) John D. Seale. (57) William E. Haines, (58) John 
Campbell, Jr., (59) Phenis Potter, (60) J. H. Cromer, 
(a) Leslie Smith, (62) Jack Fultz, (63) James Conley, 
(64) Clyde Hunsaker. 

Alternates 

(11 J. M. Martin, (2) Bradford Mutchler, (3) H. V. 
Reed. (4) A. N. Duke, (5) Gerald Tabor, (6) William 
B. Posey. (7) David Jenkms, (8) Neal R. Tucker, (9) 
W. P. Wheeler, (10) J. Ernest Atkins, (11) Noble Mid- 
kiff, (12) Bowman Davenport, (13) John McCarley, 
(141 Ron Beckham, (15) Roy Withrow, (16) RusseU 
VanZant, (17) John Hackett, (18) B. H. Weaver, (19) 
J. B. Sparks, (20) Brooks Coomer, (21) John D. 
Brown, (22) David W. Barnett, (23) Harry K. Hardin, 
(25) Charles W. Kuhn, (26) K. B. Farmer, (27) John 
Reshar, (29) John Lovell, (30) Bruce Sweeney, (31) 



A. L. Roberts, (32) Ed Sams, (33) WilUam Code, (34) 
Robert Jones, (35) Tom Hood, (36) Harold Miller, (37) 
Joe E. Sable, (38) Jarvis Parsley, (39) Elza Whalen, 
Jr.. (40) Tom Harper, (41) Ehner C. Moore, (42) Jack 
D, Johnson. (43) Ehner Gilb, (44) Walter Marcum, 
(45) Dale Moore, (46) Bob Payne, (47) Herbert Hig- 
gins. (48) Joe Gregory, (49) Jack L. Laswell, (50) 
James Davis, (51) Chester L. Qick, (52) John Mor- 
gan. (53) Roy T. Reasor, (54) Fred W. Johnson, (55) 
Fairce Wood, (56) W. O. Gabbard, (57) J. I. Cheek, 
(58) Jack F. Wells, (59) Fred W. Cox, (60) W. F. 
Doane, (61) Jack Smoot, (62) Cy Richardson, (63) 
Frank Firestine, (64) Rex MiUer. 



MINUTES OF MEETING 
K.H.S.A.A. WRESTLING COMMITTEE 
Lexington, Kentucky, October 22, 1966 

Present were: Messrs. Ted Sanford, Don R. Raw- 
lings, Jerry Abney, OrviUe Williams, and Will Evans. 

The meeting was opened by Mr. Sanford informing 
the Committee that eight additional high schools have 
added wrestUng to their athletic programing. This 
makes a total of twenty-five schools now participating 
in Kentucky. 

OrviUe WUliams showed an outstanding new fUm, 
"Wrestling Officiating lUustrated," sponsored by the 
National Federation of State High School Athletic 
Associations. This Aim wUl bs ex:eUent for coaches 
and officicils clinics. The film wiU S(X»n be available 
for distribution throughout tne state. 

Mr. Williams gave a report on his recent trip to 
Chicago where he attended the Central States Meet- 
ing for Wrestling Rules Interpreters. This meeting 
was again conducted by Finn Erickson and John Rob- 
erts. The committee was informed that the main 
purpose of the meeting is that of uniform rules inter- 
pretation throughout the United States. 

A wrestling clinic of physical education teachers and 
coaches will be conducted by Mr. WiUiams during 
the 5th District Education Meeting on November 4 at 
Butler High Sdiool, LouisviUe, Kentucky. 
STATE TOURNAMENT 

The State Wrestling Tournament has been set for 
February 10-11, 1967. Tentative arrangements have 
been made with school officials of Jeffersontown High 
School, Jeffersontown, Kentucky, to utiUze tiieir gym- 
nasium for this event. 

In all dual matches and tournaments the rules, as 
set forth in the 1967 Official CoUegiate-Scholastic 
Wrestling Guide, wUl apply with the foUowing excep- 
tions: 

1. There wUl be only one weigh-in during the State 
WrestUng Tournament. This is substituted for Rule 5, 
Section 2 (HSM-2). 

2. Riding time. To avoid the problems involved in 
keeping riding time, the committee has set up the 
following conditions for the awarding of points for 
riding time: 

a. The individual wrestler may receive only one 
point for riding time during a match. 

b. There will be no riding time accredited to either 
wrestler in the first period. 

c. The wrestler who starts a period in the offensive 
(up) position is the one who can gadn time ad- 
vantage. 

(1) He must keep control throughout the entire 
period. 

(2) He must not be penalized by the referee for 
any violations. 

(3) No riding time wUl be accredited to a wres- 
tler who does not fulfill all of these c»ndi- 
tions. 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR DECEMBER, 1966 



Page Three 



(4) One point will be given to the wrestler who 

does fulfill these conditions. 
This ruling on nding time will be substituted in 
place of Rule 8, Section 2 in the Wrestling Guide. 

In order for a school to be repre:ented at the State 
High School Wrestling Tournament the coach must 
bring at least a six (6) member team. It will be nec- 
essary for schools which plan to participate in the 
State Wrestling Tournament to inform the Tourna- 
ment Manager, Orville Williams, Seneca High School, 
Louisville, Kentucky, of their plans to attend no later 
than January 29, 1967. This is necessary to complete 
the final tournament arrangements. 

It was agreed by the wrestling committee that in 
order for wrestling to continue to grow v/e must en- 
courage more state colleges and universities to have 
wrestling as a part of their physical education and 
athletic programs. The committee would lilie to en- 
courage high school football coaches throughout the 
state to take a close look at the possibilities of wres- 
tling as an off-season sport for their football players. 
For information concerning the equipment and organi- 
zation necessary for a wrestling program, contact Mr. 
Orville Williams. 

—Will D. Evans 



MINUTES OF MEETING 

K.H.S.A.A. SWIMMING COMMITTEE 

Lexington, Ky., November 11, 1966 

The annual meeting of the K.H.S.A.A Swimming 
Committee was called to order by Chairman Alfred 
M. Reece at 4:15 p.m. in the K.H.S.A.A. Building. 
Since the previous minutes were published in the De- 
cember (1965) issue of the Kentucky High School 
Athlete, they were not read. The following members 
of the body were present: Marshall Beard, Mrs. Wil- 
bur Bell, E. W. Craik, Miss Sheila Gilreath, Edgar 
McNabb, Algie Reece, Commissioner Ted Sanford, and 
Jack Thompson. 

Since there were no reports outstanding nor old 
business to bring before the group, the matter of new 
business, namely the 1967 state meets, was introduced. 

A discussion was held regarding the difference be- 
tween the 1967 NCAA Swimming Guide and the 1966- 
1967 K.H.S.A.A. Rules and Regulations Governing State 
Swimming Meets. Since the K.H.S.A.A. regulations 
had already been printed and were presently in 
force, it was the consensus of this committee that 
K.H.S.A.A. RULE IV.— Contestants remain in force for 
the 1967 championships. (The rule reads as follows: 
"A school may enter four contestants in each event 
except the relays. A school may enter only one relay 
team. A contestant may enter three events, no more 
than two of which may be individual events.") How- 
ever, it was recommended to the Board of Control 
that for the 1967-68 school year the NCAA rule on con- 
testants be adopted. The above recommendation was 
a unanimous vote by the committee. 

The next discussion developed regarding the new 
scoring system proposed in the NCAA guide and the 
question of consolation heats (or finals) for each 
event. By unanimous vote it was recommended for 
approval by the Board of Control that the scoring 
system for Ihe 1967 meets be in line with the NCAA 
Swimming Guide's Rule IV, Section 4 (pages 13 and 
14). (Ed. — ^The rule here permits scoring for twelve 
places instead of the six places as was done in the 
past. It also implies that in addition to the final heat 
for each swimming event a consolation-final heat is to 
be conducted . . . and further that no points are 
earned unless the contestant participates in either the 
final or consolation-final.) 



The Committee approved the following: 

(1) Both Class AAA and Class AA Championships 
will be conducted as two-day affairs (if feasible to 
the institutions lending the facility). 

(2) Class AAA Championships arc to be staged at 
Plantation Pool, Louisville, on February 24-25, 1967. 

(3) Class AA Champion^h'.ps will be held at Coli- 
seum Pool, Le.xington, on March 24-25, 1967. 

(4) Girls' events will be held on Fridays, and Boys' 
events, will be held on Saturdays. 

The Commissioner stated that he had asked Messrs. 
Thompson and Reece to serve respectively as manag- 
ers of the CHass AAA and CTlass AA championships, 
and that each had accepted the assignment. 

It was the unanimous opinion of the Committee that 
resolutions be drawn and presented for the record 
concerning the untimely death of Ralph Wright, Plan- 
tation Swim Club manager. Marshall Beard was given 
Ihe assignment to prepare such resolutions. 

Adjournment was at 6:05 p.m. 

— Jack Thompson 



Supplementary List of 

Registered Football Officials 

(List Compiled November 25) 

If one telephone number is given for an official listed, 
it is the home phone unless otherwise designated. If two 
numbers are given, the first number is that of the home 
phone. 

Crager, Bobby. South Lake Drive, Prestonsburg, 8S.J-:^r.S2, 

886-2467 
Mitchell, Emmett, 511 McCubbins. Lexington. 254-4417 (Bus.) 
Reeves, Bob. 5229 Leona Drive. Cincinnati. Ohio, 922-2645, 

481-1:577 



Supplementary List of 
Registered Basketball Officials 

(List Compiled November 25) 

If one telephone number is given for an official listed, 
it is the home phone unless otherwise designated. If two 
numbers are given, the first number is that of the home 
phone. 

Alexander, Rick, 704 Woodland Ave.. Lexington, 252-9323 
.'Anderson, Glenn S., Jr., Box 32:i. Prestonsburg 
■Anderson. Luther S.. Liberty Heights. Carlisle, 907. 252-2250 
Atkins, Wayne. 106 Watson Court, Georgetown. 863-0609, 

252-2250 ext. 3224 
Beam, Joseph F.. 1st Street, New Haven, 549-3162, 348-3991 
Bishop. Heulyn. 340 Kenwood Road, Russell, 836-5906. 836-3531 
Blair, Ivan, Box 11, Jeremiah, 633-2991 I Bus. I 
Blandford, Richard. 3811 Colonial Drive, Louisville, 895-6771 
Block. Lloyd H., Route No. 2. Eminence, S45-5262 
Bowling, Donald E., Box 641, Whitesburg, 633-2196 
Boyles. Paul E., 809 Bellfonte. Flatwoods, 836-5491, 324-1174 

ext. 302 
Brennenstuhl. Jim, Box 2, Williamsburg, G782 
Bridges, Ralph L., 2424 Anne Ave., Henderson, 826-4088 
Broaddus, William D.. 643 Limestone, <;!, D. E. McDaniel, 

Lexington. 252-8804. 348-3886 
Brock. John D.. 129i.j Cherry, Pineville 
Brown, J. W. "Scoop", 975 Waverly Drive, Lexington, 252- 

0954. 252-3212 
Brown, Leonard C. 7504 Jamaica Drive. Louisville 
Browning, Tommy, Route No. 1. Foster, 472-2146. 261-1300 

ext. 25 
Bumpus, Larry Ray, Route No. 1. Dixon. ME 7-5169 
Burke. Michael Charles, 273 St. Agnes Circle. Lookout Heights, 

Covington, 331-1593 
Burnett. W. L., 1205 Poplar St., Clarksville. Tenn. 
Burton. Charles W., 401 Rosewood. Somerset, 678-8077. 678-4516 
Butler, Donald A., Box 430, Owensboro. 683-3175 
Caldwell, Charles M.. Route No. 3. Box 296, Proctorville, 

Ohio, 886-6646, Huntington, W. Va. 529-1311 
Callighan. Robert Wells, University Station, Box 918, Mur- 
ray. 762-2758 
Caple. Harold E.. 608 Church. Ludlow. 261-5384 
Carrico. Trimmy, 1305 Vine. Murray. 753-7737. 753-9061 
Carter, Morris Albert. Route No. 3, Philpot, 233-5002, 683-644S 
Cawnod. Tommy L.. 104 Jones St.. Harlan, 573-2396. 573-3711 
Chafin, Bert. 4213 Norbonrne Blvd. No. 2. LouisvUle. 895-512? 
Chambers. Virgil. 1809 Gayle. Lexington. 299-5962. 299-4027 
Chinley. David. 720 Aurora Ave.. Lexington. 254-1777 
Clark, Gary Dale, Route No. 1. Dixon. 639-2011 
Cleavenger. Edward G., Route No. 1, Bo.x 8, Morganfield, 

389-1697. 389-2429 ext. 381 
Clevenger. Mike, Route No. 2. Box 345. .Ash'and, 928-8803, 

928-8803 



Page Four 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR DECEMBER, 1966 



CoHey. Marion, SOlO Edsel Lane, Fern Creek. 239-0832 

Collier. Ray. Jr.. Warfield. 395-5341 (Bus.) 

Collins, Ernie, Box 61, Stanville, GR 8-6194 

Collins, James R., Jr., 715 Haverhill Drive, Le.xington, 277- 

3194, 277-3977 
Colvin. Jack E.. 3605 N. Evans Ave., Evansville, Ind., 423- 

1696,426-2314 
Conley, t^eorge Larry. 2001 Garden Springs Dr., Lexington, 

277-7575 
Cox, Bufus A., Route No. 4, Island Ford Rd.. Madisonville, 

s:ix-ioy2, b21-:ii^D 
Cl-ager, Bobby, South Lake Drive, Prestonsburg, 886-3682, 

Davenport, James E., Dawson Hill Rd., Jeffersontown, 239- 
odd i, 4&4-(oil exr. 3947 
Davis, A. J., b4S Mapie St., Hazard, 436-4440, 436-3333 
Day, Cnaries K., no uarmon Ave., Glasgow, 65i-39U5, 434-8911 
DecJter, Uennis L., l07 J=,ari, Crane, Indiana, 854- (490, 854-1245 
Dodson, G. Winston, 321 Jesseim Drive, Lexington, 277-2098, 

2o2-22o0 
Duncan, Earl S., 10007 Taylorsville Rd., Jeffersontown, 267- 

X4(8, &yo-0o67 
Duncan, Gilbert, 3110 Commander Drive, Louisville 
Easiriage, tsoboy Arlin, »U6 JNo. Columbia, Campbeilsville, 465- 

094;i, 400-0381 
Elam, James Uerriel, 1740 Jennifer, Apt. A3, Lexington, 

299-7026 

Elmore, Jimmy A., Ekron, 828-6172, 828-3122 

Fannin, JacK, 715 Williams St., Flatwoods, 836-3920 

Flynn, Daireil, Science nul, 4z3-2i2l, 4<io-z(2l 

Ford. Konaid K., 2U0-B Main Su, i'almoum. 654-3755, 654-3355 

Fowler, lionald S.. 338 Strawberry Drive, MaysviUe, 564-5911 

Fi-ady, Claude Wesley, Box 88, Wayland, 358-2332. 

Frye. Gu. 3io E. Water, J^lemingsburg, S45-14U1, 845-2551 

Fugate, Don, Kowdy, 436-5377 

Fulkei-son, James K., 1611 Navajo Drive, Owensboro 684-5458, 

683-6272 
Fuqua, Konaid Hugh. 8811 Moody Road. Louisville, 964-0695 
Gaines. Curtis. 29 Maple St., Henderson. VA 6-9933, VA 7-3708 
Gaines. Harvey, 762 B. 43rd St., Louisville, 774-4U66. TW 5-3401 

ext. 323 
Gardner, Howard E., 829 McCuUum. Elizabethtown, 765-6273, 

543-2494 
Gash. James Edwin., 716 Greenbriar, Harrodsburg, 734-4647, 

734-4195 
Gibson. Fred W., 2509 Charlestown Road, New Albany, Ind., 

945-0018. 774-2363 
Cover. Luid J.. Somerset, 678-6506. 678-5506 
Gray. Kenneth. IISH 12th St., Apt. No. 3, Bowling Green. 
Greene, Thei-man R., 5610-B Gilkey Loop, Ft. Knox, 4-7960, 

4-6SU 
Greer. Phillip G.,. 420 Hilltop, Lexington, 252-2200 ext. 2341 

(Bus.) 
Gregory. Garland Wayne. 5305 Oak Lea Drive. Louisville. 

447-0358. 5n4-8228 
Gregory, Terry M., Route No. 1, Box 142-B. Corbin, 528-3781 
Griffin, John M.. 400 Barkley, Falmouth. 654-8628. 472-6901 
Grooms, Roger, 7635 Forest Road, Cincinnati, Ohio. 232-0024. 

231-3601 
Halcomb. Robert C. Route No. 1. Box 166A, Milford, Ohio 
Hall. Richard G., Box 204, Wheelwright. 3216 
Hall, William C, Church St., New Castle. 346-5395 
Hall. William W., Bonanza. 886-2005, 886-3548 
Hanev, Raymond, Milo. 298-3308 

Hanlon. Patrick W.. 128-A Cliff Rd.. North Bend, Ohio 
Harper. Dennis. Box 53. Frenchburg. 76S-4210 
Harris, James F.. Jr.. 2037 St. Teresa Drive, Lexington. 266- 

4096. 255-2960 ext. 255 
Hofmeister, William E.. 841 Packard Ave., Louisville, 637-5259 
Holton. Ray. 9715 Shady Acres, Jeffersontown, 267-6643 
Hughes. Charles. Wayland. 358-3861. 358-2341 
Hurst. Dale, 22 W. Lexington Ave., Winchester, 744-7716, 744- 

4915 
Irwin, Charles R., Route No. 4, Hopkinsville, TU 6-4820. TU 

6-4820 
Jewell. Billy Jackie, 926 Hickman Ave., Owensboro. 683-7234 
Johnson. Danny Thomas, Box 148. Flemingsburg 
Johnson. Jack. Box 171. Hindman. 785-5126. Mousie 946-3833 
Johnson. James M., 174 Pinehurst Drive. Frankfort. 223-2822. 

223-8359 
Johnson. Jimmy I.. 105 McMullin Ave., Flemingsburg. 845-6601 

(Bus. I 
Johnson, Jerry Lee, 313 Kentucky Ave.. Georgetown. 863-0333, 

Lexington 252-2250 ext. 2204 
Jones, William L.. 814 McCullum Ave., Elizabethtown, 765- 

6061. 765-6247 
Keeling. Reuben, Theobold Rd., Route No. 8. Paducah, 443- 

5260. 442-6431 
Kelasch. James R., 8899 Balboa, Cincinnati, Ohio 
Kilcoyne, James D., Fancy Farm, 753-5517 (Bus.) 
Knight, B. Rodney, Route No. 1. Box 282A. Greenville. 338-3535 
Knox, Edward G. III. 333 Tippett. Morehead 
Lambert. Irvin, 5110 Rural Way. Louisville 
Lane. Dorman. Faubush 

Lenox. Robert Michael, Route No. 1, 'Berry, 234-2986, Lex- 
ington 252-2200 ext. 4923 
Lewis, Jerry Burl, Box 184. Sandy Hook. 738-5442 
Lewis. Phillip D.. Burkesville Rd.. Glasgow, 651-5635, 651-5552 
Little, Duane, Minnie 



Logsdon. Allen Thomas. Route No. 2. Brandenburg, 422-2859 
iVlcBride, W. Kenneth, 157 St. William Drive, Lexington. 266- 

7786, 256-6666 
McClure, William S., 404 College, Box 260, London, 864-6940, 

864-2244 
McGlothlin, Leonard, 1912 Mt. Vernon Drive, Owensboro 

684-7065, 683-2401 ext. 518 
McKenzie, Robert, Box 694, Russell, 836-6193, 836-8112 
McKenzie, Robert L., 1809 Chestnut St.. Kenova, W. Va. 
McMurdo. Bruce, 1065 Hudson Ave., Lexington. 255-4078, 254- 

9223 
McNichols, Teddy J., Route No. 1, Cadiz. 622-6235 
Marema, Jack G., Annville, 364-2446, 364-3320 
Marsnail. St C Fred, HHC-lOlst ABN. Division, Ft. Campbell, 

798-3450, 798-6090 
Martin, Delano. 6007 Cole Ave., Louisville, 447-4667 
Mattingly, Charles, 3813 Poplar Level, Louisville, 459-5793, 

459-6085 
Meadows, Marvin, Clayhole, 666-5057, 666-2481 
Montgomery, Don, Box 11, Burgin. 748-5582, 748-5180 
Moore, Richard E., Route No. 3, Box 287, Mt. Vernon. In- 
diana, 838-2882, 838-4886 
Mulligan. J. T., 427 Center. Erlanger. 341-6628, 341-5628 
Nash. Dennis B., 2426 Donna Rd., Louisville, 447-8161, 447-3442 
Newman, Stephen, Route No. 3, Greenville, 338-1614 
Nickell. Charles W., Box 166. Sandy Hook, 738-6216 
Noble, Howard W., 415 Hill St., Hazard, 436-4630 
Nord, Ed, 7005 Green Manor Drive, Louisville. 239-9160, 896- 

3401 ext. 202 
Nunemaker. John, Somerset, 678-6009, 678-5081 
Oiler, Jerry, 2508 Duke Drive. Georgetown Apt. No. 4, Ow- 
ensboro. 684-6024 (Bus.) 
Owens, Bruce V.. Box 12. New Castle. 346-5348 
Park, J. M.. 5601 Benton Highway, Box 299, Paducah, 898-2785 
Parsons. Kenneth E.. Evarts, 573-4669, 837-2502 
Peay, Curtis E., Route No. 5, Bowling Green. 843-3616, 843- 

8171 
Polston. Billy D., Tompkinsville. 487-6682. 487-5639 
Pope, Roy, 613 W. 4th St.. London. 864-6716 
Powers. Larry D., 2321 Shawnee Lane, Paducah. 443-3071 
Pressnell, Denny, Box 3031 Cooperstown. U. of Ky., Lexing- 
ton. 252-2200 ext. 3731 
Piuitt, John Randall, 507 E. Jackson. Clinton, OL 3-6415 
Raikes, Larry D.. E. Main St., Hodgenville, 358-3678, 368-367f 
Rawlings, Charles, French St., Elizabethtown, 765-2529. 765- 

5237 
Rees, John DeWitt, 417 Huguelet Dr.. Lexington. 252-9018 
Eeherman. Fred 2805 Woodmont Dr., Louisville. 459-6673, 425- 

2542 
Robinson. Jackie A., 319 Lincoln Park. Springfield. 336-7821. 

Mackville. 262-6535 
Roop, Bennett B., Meadow Lark. Berea, 986-3652 
St. Clair. Robert L., Jr.. 4306 Leaf Drive, Louisville, 361-2493 

361-2658 
Scalf. Dean Hubert, Stanville, 432-2164 (Bus.) 
Schneider. Phillip T.. 409 Meadow Park. Lexington, 252-4003 
Shelton. Charles W.. Route No. 2. Box 121. Ashland. 928-8294 
Sherrow. Winston G.. Box 571. Beattyville. 464-8444 
Simpson. James. 312 McAlpin, Erlanger, 341-1677 
Sims. Clifford. 3605 Norbourne Blvd.. Louisville 
Sims, Genie G., 417 Morgan Ave., Harrodsburg. 734-4989 
Smithson. Richard A.. 302 Main. Box ^18, Lynch, 848-2867. 

848-5486 
Snorton, Claude. Jr., 107 W. Edmunds. Hopkinsville, 886- 

6575. 886-8278 
Speed, Walter J., 1974 N.. Lynndale. Cincinnati, Ohio, 931- 

8786 
Stallard, Nathan H., Box 135, Evarts, 837-2226. 673-9035 
Stroud, Donnie M., 173 Tennyson Drive. Owensboro, MU 4- 

6401. MU 4-8881 ext. 36 
Swinford, James W.. 5502 Oak Creek Lane. Fern Creek. 

239-0055. 448-2761 
Tarvin. Roger Wayne, 13 Woodland Ave., Ft. Thomas, HI 

1-1232 
Taylor. Clayton A.. Route No. 4, Mt. Sterling, 498-2583, 498- 

2250 
Taylor. Rogers E., 4847 Grandview Drive. Owensboro, 684-6992, 

684-7219 
Thomas, James Edward, 402 Morgantown Road, Bowling 

Green, 842-3659, 842-1645 
Thompson. Larry. Box 36. Mt. Sterling. 498-2020 (Bus.) 
Thompson. Thomas A., 3436 Greentree Sd., Lexington, 266- 

8921. Frankfort. 664-4796 
Thornsburv. Harry Joseph. Seminary Ave., Augusta. 756-2831 
Tillery. James Carl. Dixie Park. Route No. 1. Berea, 986-4676 
Tuttle, Cecil, 33 White Ave.. Mt. Sterling, 498-5703, 498-2660 
Ulrey. William R., 8805 Planet Drive, Cincinnati, Ohio 
VanMeter, McNeil. Bee Spring. 597-2000 
Vanover. Wiley G.. Jackhorn 

VanTatenhove. Kenneth, Annville. 364-2445, 364-3320 
Vice. Charles G., Route No. 3, Virginia Ave.. Mt. Sterling. 

498-0393. 498-3800 
Vincent, Gary M., Box 53, Brooksville, 736-9131 
Wallace, Robert Keith. 700 Woodland, Lexington. 252-3030. 

252-3030 
Ward. Donald E.. Box 393, Inez, 298-3502 
Ward, K. W.. Box 102. Vei-sailles. 873-5677, 873-5001 
Ward, Willis, 1002 Walnut St.. Murray, 753-6147 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR DECEMBER, 1956 



Page Five 



HIGHLANDS — CLASS AA FINALIST 

3^ 




(Left to Right) Front Row: Jeff Waldenmayer. Tim Racke, Clem Fennell. Tim Pogue, Bob Wasser, Jack 
Noll, John Ullman. Pete Christofield, Mark Garrett, Hank Pogue. Second Row: Kent Knaebel. Gary 
Gabennesch. Dan Owens, Jerry Krentz. Rick Hoffman, Kerry Warner, Stuart Mohlman. Jim Waite, Ken 
Grimm. Third Row: Tom Bohart, Bob Greene, Jerry Toner, Scott McMurray, Rick Tavel, Chuck Pogue, 
Stuart Garrett, Jack Eicher, Phil Waddell. Fourth Row-: Tom Heilman, Roger Kyle, Don Willig, Mark 
Barringer, Jerry Raisor, Bob Hesch, Jim Scott, Rick Ambrose. Dennis Pompilio. Fifth Row: Jay Ramsey, 

rHike Meyer, Jack Huenefield. Greg Oetjen. Greg Baxter, Jim Kuhnhein, Ken Lackey, Bob Compton, 
Pavid Otto. Sixth Row: Marc Lukens, Doug Crooks, John Wright, Morris Cecil, Paul Pratt, Scott Miller, 
Kent Fennell. 



BUTLER — CLASS AAA FINALIST 



'- — ip^- 








^4jg*^> 





(Left to Right) Front Row: Randy Slayton, Timmy Robinson, Jeff Eisner, Charlie O'Neal, Dennis 
Roberts, Bobby Showalter, Charles Curt'S, Greg Jones, Larry Lane. .Second Row : Coach Fargnoli, 
Coach (Trum, Dennis Grider, Danny Burns, Larry Kessinger, Joe Carroll, Tony Swindall, Don Grider, 
Charlie Showalter, Leonard Sabin, Coach Perpich. Third Row : Coach Nachand, Tommy Holderf ield, 
Daryl Smith, Jim Clark, David Durbin, Craig Jones, Kenny Hart, Ralph Williams. Larry McDonald, 
Ronnie Robinson, John Hodge, Chuck Anderson, Danny Maxberry, Coach CoUina. Fourth Row ; Nathan 
Wheat. Jerry Stults. David Bock. Joe Wolf. Jerry Joyce, Jim Grant, Eddie Embry, David Weedman, 
Bill Byrnes. David Mobley. 



Warrix, Lew:s H., Wai rix Lane, Jackson. 6G6-5764. 566-2481 
Watkins, Tho.Tias H., College Hgts., Box 68, Bowling Green, 

842-4557 
Weidner, Robert B.. 6432 Louese Lane. Cincinnati, Ohio, 662- 

5821, 684-3283 
Weihe, Robert Joseph, 643 Emily Road, Louisville, 895-5314, 

776-2400 
White, Gerald, Brownsville, 597-3266. 597-2975 

Wilbert Donald A., 3504 E Indian Trail, Louisville, 969-8733. 
448-2761 ext. 281 

Wilbert, Louis Joseph. 3504 Terrier Lane, Louisville. 458- 
4092, 584-3131 



Williams, Tom G.. Henry Clay Hall, Transylvania College, 

Lexington, 255-2960 ext. 326 
Williams, Willie H.. 413 Elm St.. Lexington. 252-4201, 252-3212 
Winnecke. John E., 1502 Brentwood, Ovvensboro. 684-2604, 

684-5285 
Witten, Clifford, Wurtland Ave.. Wurtlan.l, 836-8806 
Witten. James Richard, Wurtland Ave., Wurtland, 836-S806 
Yelton, Gene B.. Route No. 2. Brooksville. 735-3922 
Yewell. Morgan Radcliffe. Jr.. 475 Flamingo Ave.. Frank- 
fort, 875-2745, Lexington, 255-1430 
Zachary. David Allen, Cliffway Drive, Carlisle, 340, 18 
ZoKK. Joe, Box 1218. Owensboro, MU 3-0152, MU 3-7301 



Page Six 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR DECEMBER, 1966 



The Flying Dutchman 

It's Christmas time in Kentucky ! It's time 
to look back over twelve months to take 
inventory of the contributions you have 
made to other Kentuckians. It's a time for 
reminiscing and it's a time to count bless- 
ings. 

Because it's Christmas time you're a lit- 
tle happier because you recall a little crip- 
pled kid whom you helped when you put in 
the K. H. S. A. A. Game Guy Program. 
You're happier again because it's the birth- 
day of a baby who grew to manhood preach- 
ing, "Even as much as ye do to the least of 
these ye do also unto me." Maybe, because 
it's Christmas time in Kentucky you're a bit 
remorseful because of the youngster you 
intended to help but you put it off too long. 
Give yourself your first Christmas present 
now — Find that unfortunate kid, introduce 
him to sports and make him fortunate be- 
cause you're his friend. Your ne^t move is 
to mail his story to The Flying Dutchman, 
Box 36, Jeffersontown, and the kid will 
immediately be a winner. 

Because it's Christmas time in Kentucky 
you should take time to consider the follow- 
ing quotation by Basile taken from the De- 
cember issue of Guideposts: "A good deed 
i'\ never lost; he who sows courtesy, reaps 
friendship, and he who plants kindness, 
gathers love." This is the reason for the 
Dutchman's Corn Cob Pipe of Honor award 
which goes to those performing unselfish 
services for others. During the past year 
whom did you recommend to the Dutchman 
for a corn cob pipe award and whom are 
you thinking of citing in 1967? 

The Corn Cob Pipe Award for December 
goes to a basketball official from Cincinnati 
who sets a fine example for others with 
his service. Emmanuel H. Scott lives at 1614 
Potter Place in the Queen City but August 
of each year finds him in Lexington spend- 
ing a couple of days at the School for Bas- 
ketball Officials. Each September finds hjm 
at the Dutchman's clinic at Newport, al- 
ways trying to become a better official so 
he can give the kids who play ball in Cincin- 
nati's church, industrial and Y. M. C. A. 
leagues better officiated contests. Emman- 
uel works high school games in northern 
Kentucky as well as Ohio and a good bit of 
fees always goes to help what he calls the 
"Pee Wees." Merry Christmas, Manny. 
You've earned it. 

Because it's Christmas in Kentucky our 
reminiscing causes us to salute Cliff Harper, 
Alabama's former high school commission- 
er, for the fine Christmas present which he 




Emmanuel H. Scott 

gave to the nation in his book of cartoons 
illustrating every important play in basket- 
ball. It is the Dutchman's opinion that 
Cliff's book, which Cliff Fagan jointly edits 
with him, is the greatest contribution to 
uniformity of officiating which has ap- 
peared in the history of the sport. If you 
don't have one, get one! 

Reminiscing at this Christmas time, my 
memory brings back the year of 1928 when 
Coach Ed Diddle christened me the Flying 
Dutchman and said, "You've got to be a 
stubborn little Dutchman who must never 
forget to get up every time you get knocked 
down" — I never forgot this greatest coach- 
ing I ever received from the Old Master. 
It's 1942 and Commissioner Ted telephones 
from Henderson to say, "Dutchman, I want 
you to be my clinic director." This assign- 
ment has meant the difference between an 
exciting life and a humdrum one and it has 
opened many doors. One of these doors 
opened when, at another Christmas time in 
1952, H. V. Potter gave the Dutchman his 
first commission on the National Rules 
Committee. So, at this Yuletide I thank God 
for the friendships of Milt Sprunger, Ted 
Sanford, H. V. Porter, Doc Runyon, Cliff 
Fagan, Joe Billy Mansfield, Paul Landis, 
Harold Meyer, John Bunn, Phil Eskew, 
Herman Keller, Dave Arnold, Les Ansorge, 
Lyle Ouinn, L. V. Phillips. Bob Henshaw, 
Russ Williamson and a hundred or two oth- 
ers. Some years have passed, that's true, 
so to these old friends I pass on this poem 
by an unknown author: 

I shall not mind 

The whiteness of my hair, 



THE KENTQCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR DECEflVEBER, 1966 



Page Seven 



EASTERN — CLASS AAA, REGION 2. DISTRICT 2, CHAMPION 



iF_7^ rf i:t^:t 



-f 







(Left to Kight) Front Row: D. Green, J. Pope, P. Moser. M. Parsons, R. Frantz, B. Whitehouse, 
J, Phelps, N. Dearner, B. Davenport. Second Row: R. Green, J. Costanzo, H. Trowell, F. Cunningham, 
N. Kaufman, J. Schulze, A. Rothenburger, A. Carroll, G. Estes. Third Row: M. Skinner, T. Shelby, 
M. Lyons, B. Reynolds, B. Blanton. L. Jacobson, R. Jackman, H. CaMwell, T. Stephens. Fourth Row: 
M. Campbell. M. Stewart, J. Foley, D. Jackman, P. Whitson, P. Massey, J. Foree, B. Troutman, M. 
Lewis. Fifth Row: Mgr. B. Greer, K. Dadisman, G. Russell, B. Skinner, B. Tarpley, M. Watson, L. 
Wooten, R. Wallace, Mgr. E. Goyne. Sixth Row : Coaches McGuire, Young, Hall, Taylor, Trainer 
Watkins. 



CORBIN 



CLASS AA. REGION 4. DISTRICT I. CHAMPION 




(Left to Right) Front Kow : Ass't Coach Toby McCormiek, Jerry Lankster, John Hamlin, Jim Mobley, 
Tony Asbridge, Jim Ed Wilder, Phil Huston, Coach Hal Lockhart. Second Row: Mike MiisVk, Tommy 
Driggers, Frank Curry, Joe Butch White, Dennis Whitt, Mike Kersey, Ray Jones. Third Row : Mgr. 
Howard Thompson, Jim Malone, Mike Cobb, David Skeens, Scott Wilson, Kenny Mobley, Alvie B'ble. 



Or that slow steps falter 

On the stair, 
Or that young friends hurry 

As they pass, 
Or what strange image 

Greets me in the glass — 
If I can feel. 

As roots feel in the sod. 
That I am growing old to bloom 
Before the face of God. 
So it's Christmas time in Kentucky and 
it's a much different Kentucky than it was 
when the newspapers were recording the 



schoolboy athletic achievements of Mur- 
ray's Ty Holland, Corbin's Dean Eagle, Hop- 
kinsville's Oakley Brown, Bowling Green's 
Doug Smith, Kentucky's Turkey Hughes 
and Louisville's Earl Ruby — but Christmas 
time is unchanged because we are going to 
take personal inventory again, reminisce 
once more and count our blessings one more 
time. 

As the Dutchman closes his Merry Christ- 
mas column he anticipates eagerly a gigan- 
tic gift from hundreds of Kentuckians — 
Their friendship. 



Page Eight 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR DECEMBER, 1966 



Official Dickinson Ratings For The 1966 Football Season 



CLASS A 

REGION 1 
District 1 



Team 



W 



Russellville 5 

Murray 4 

Fulton 4 

Ft. Campbell 3 

Warren County 1 

Crittenden County 1 

Trigg County 1 



Fulton County 







♦Crittenden County defeated Trigg County 
District 2 

1. Campbellsville 4 

2. Tompkinsville 3 

3. Glasgow 3 

4. Greensburg 1 

4. Metcalfe County 1 

6. Cumberland County 

REGION 2 
District 1 

1. Bardstown 4 

2. Old Kentucky Home 4 

3. Lebanon 2 

4. Snepnerdsviile 

4. Wasnington County 

6. Eminence 2 

6. Louisville Country Day 2 

♦Bardstown defeated Old Kentucky Home 

District 2 

1. Frankfort 4 

2. Garrard County 4 

3. Anderson 4 

4. Boyle County 3 

5. Berea 3 

6. Stanford 3 

7. Georgetown 2 

S. Mercer County 2 

9. Burgin 

9. Harrodsburg 

11. Ky. School for the Deaf 

11. Sayre 

11. Scott County 1 

REGION 3 
District 1 



1. Dayton 4 1 

2. Bellevue 3 2 

3. Ludlow 4 2 

4. Lloyd 3 2 

5. Carroll County 2 3 

6. Beechwood 1 3 

7. Owen County 4 

*Ludlow defeated Lloyd 

District 2 

1. Millersburg Mil. Inst. 5 

2. Paris 3 

3. Mt. Sterling 4 

4. Nicholas County 3 

5. Bath County 1 

6. Irvine 

7. Falmouth 

REGION 4 
District 1 

1. Pineville 4 

2. London 5 

3. Harlan 1 

4. Lily 2 

5. Williamsburg 2 

6. Hazel Green 1 

7. Lynn Camp 1 

8. Mt. Vernon 

8. Lynch 2 

District 2 

1. Paintsvillc 6 

2. Fleming Neon 4 

3. Elkhorn City 3 

4. Catlettsburg 4 

5. Pikeville 3 

6. Morgan County 2 

7. Wheelwright 1 



Rating 

22. 6U 

21.25 

la.Ul) 

lo.JU 

12.50 

11.66* 

11.66 

N.R. 









26.0U 


1 


u 


21.25 


2 





18.00 


3 


1 


13.00 


a 


1 


13.00 


4 





10.00 


1 





21.25' 


1 





2l.a5 


■A 


u 


16.U0 


5 





lO.OO 


4 





10.00 


1 





N.R. 








N.R. 









25.00 


3 





22.50 


1 


1 


ai.87 


1 


1 


ia.60 


1 





18.75 


3 





16.67 


2 





15.00 


4 


u 


13.33 


4 





10.00 


6 





10.00 


1 





N.R. 


1 





N.R. 








N.R. 



23.75 

22.50 

20.00* 

20.00 

15.00 

12.50 

10.00 



11 





Z2.50 


1 


u 


18.75 


1 





17.00 


a 





13.33 


4 





12.00 


5 





10.00 


2 





N.R. 



8. Johns Creek 







9. Wurtland 



fl 


1 


21.25 


2 





18.57 


2 


1 


15.00 


3 





14.00 


4 





13.33 


3 





12.50 


4 





12.48 


n 





N.R. 


6 





N.R. 


n 





27.60 


T 





21.25 


2 





20.00 


2 





18.33 


4 





14.28 


4 





13.33 


5 





11.66 


4 





10.00 


1 





N.R. 



CLASS AA 

REGION 1 
District 1 



Team 



W 



1. Hopkinsville 6 

2. Caldwell County 4 

3. Mayfiekl 3 

4. Franklin Simpson 4 

5. Paducah Tilghman 2 

6. BoWiing Green 

6. Madisonville 



8. Chiist.an County 



District 2 







1. Henderson County 5 

2. Daviess County 3 

3. Owensboro Catholic 2 

4. Owensboro 2 

5. Henderson 2 

6. Union County 

REGION 2 
District 1 

1. Fort Kno.x 6 

2. St. Joseph 3 

3. Elizabethtown 2 

4. Oldham County 5 

5. LaRue County 4 

6. North Hardin 2 

7. Meade County 2 

8. Shelby County 1 

Ky. Military Inst. 1 



10. Henry County 



District 2 







1. Henry Clay 6 

2. Bourbon County 4 1 

3. Harrison County 5 11 

4. Dunbar 3 10 

5. Bryan Station 6 3 

6. Danville 5 10 

7. Lafayette 4 5 

8. Somerset 3 4 

9. Woodford County 2 3 

10. Clark County 16 

10. Madison 16 

10. Shelbyville 16 

13. Tates Creek 10 

13. Madison Central 3 

13. Jessamine County 12 

REGION 3 
District 1 

1. Highlands 5 

2. Holmes 4 2 

3. Campbell County 3 2 1 

4. Boone County 2 4 

5. Dixie Heights 2 4 

6. Newport 4 1 

7. Newport Catholic 3 

7. Simon Kenton 3 

* Boone County defeated Dixie Heights 
District 2 

1. Ashland 3 10 

2. McKell 6 1 

3. Boyd County 4 2 

4. Russell 3 2 1 

5. Raceland 13 2 

6. Rowan County 2 3 

7. Louisa 4 1 

8. Fleming County 3 

* Ashland winner by win over McKell 
REGION 4 
District 1 

1. Corbin 6 

2. Middlesboro 5 11 

3. Evarts 3 11 

4. Bell County 3 10 

5. Cumberland 13 

5. Knox Central 13 

7. James A. Cawood 5 

8. Whitley County 5 

District 2 

1. Belfry 5 

2. Jenkins 5 10 

3. Prestonsburg 3 2 

4. Hazard 2 3 

5. Whitesburg 14 

6. M. C. Napier 14 

7. Leslie County 3 

•Whitesbui-g beat M. C. Napier 



Rating 

27.50 
21.87 
20.62 
20.00 
14.00 
10.00 
10.00 
N.R. 



22.50 
19.10 
16.00 
15.00 
14.00 
10.00 



25.61 
23.75 
21.87 
20.00 
17.86 
13.33 
12.86 
12.50 
12.00 
10.00 



25.00 
23.13 
21.87 
21.25 
19.44 
19.17 
14.44 
14.29 
14.00 
11.43 
11.43 
11.43 
N.R. 
N.R. 
N.R. 



2S.&9 

21.25 

16.67 

13.33* 

13.33 

12.00 

N.R. 

N.R. 



23.75* 

23.75 

20.00 

19.17 

17.00 

14.00 

11.25 

N.R. 



25.00 
21.87 
19.50 
18.75 
12.50 
12.50 
10.00 
10.00 



25.00 

21.25 

18.00 

14.00 

12.00* 

12.00 

N.R. 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR DECEMBER, 1935 



Page Nine 



HENRY CLAY — CLASS AA, REGION 2, CHAMPION 



» 




(Left to Right) Front Row: Hilary Skees, Bobby Ell.oti, Gene Zimmer. Hareld Critchfield, John 
Bloom field, Mike Wodtke, Don Young, Joe Stidham. Kirk Chiles, Mike Wainscott. Second Row : I^arry 
Small wood. Tommy Lambert, Bobby Beck, Mike Green, Mark Schreiber, Jimmy Daniels. Mike Hart, 
Danny Featherston, Charles Neville, Wallace Jones. Third Row : Steve Watts. Russell Hopkins, Bruce 
Wilkinson, Frank Purdy, Steve Marlowe, Do well Piatt. Mike Allen, Mike Fiveash, Steve Nelson, 
Dick Arnspiger. Fourth Row: Steve Green. Robert Ross, Mickey Lambert, Ernie Vicars, Darrell 
Ball, Mark Hopkins, Gary Moore. Bobby Cheatham, Stenson Henderson, Mark Skees. Fifth Row: Ass't 
Coach Elmer Gilb. Ass't Coach Buford Bingham. Do well Harper. Roger Jackson, Phillip Murray. 
Charles Rhoads, Ass't Coach Al Prewitt, Head Coach Andy Hopkins. Sixth Row : Mgrs. George 
Prewitt, Mike Brown, Danny Allen, David H/irper. 

HENDERSON COUNTY — CLASS AA, REGION I, DISTRICT 2, CHAMPION 







L'li **'*> "Y^ rw -,"► .•".'^ 







(Left to Right) Front Row: Sigler, G. Wilson, Boono. liarnes. Hopper, t'oleman, Herron, Brady, 
Staples, Brown, Griffith. Second Row: Fellows, Kellon, Posey, Lambert, Dawson, Minton, Overton, 
Fruit, Floyd, Logan. Third Row: Mattingly, Thornberry, Peckenbaugh, Springs, Brackett, C. Wilson, 
Norsworthy, Cox, Stanley, Sutton, Taylor. Fourth Row: Cunningham, Wright, Long, Ligon, Dillard, 
Bentley, Rucks, Hancock, Fisher. Dempewolf. Fifth Row: Mattox, Rodway, Head Coach, Hellowell, 
Ass*t Coach Harper, Ass't Coach Benson, Ass't Coach Feix. 



CLASS AAA 

REGION 1 

Team W L 

1. Manual 8 

2. Male 7 1 

3. Flaget 5 2 

4. Shawnee 2 3 

5. St. Xavier 4 4 

6. Bishop David 2 3 

7. DeSales 3 5 

8. Atherton 1 4 

9. Central 1 5 

9. Trinity 1 5 

11. Iroquois 2 

*St. Xavier beat Bishop David 



Rating 






1 
1 


22.60 
19.37 
18.75 
15.83 





16.00 


1 


16.00 





13.75 


1 


12.50 





11.67 


n 


11 67 





N.R. 



REGION 2 
District 1 

Butler 4 

Pleasure Ridge Park 4 1 

Valley 3 2 

Western 2 2 

Fairdale 1 4 

Southern 5 

District 2 

Eastern 4 2 

Waggener 4 2 

Seneca 4 2 

Thomas Jefferson 3 3 

Westport 3 3 

Durrett 2 4 

Fern Creek 1 5 

*Seneca beat Thomas Jefferson 
**Durrett beat Fern Creek 






22.50 





21.25 





18.00 





16.00 





12.00 





10.00 


!) 


20.00 





19.17 





18.33* 





18.33 





16.00 





13.34** 





13.34 



Page Ten 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR DECEMBER, 1966 



FORT KNOX — CLASS AA, REGION 2, DISTRICT I, CHAMPION 



»#,• •' 









.W 






-V^-. 



(Left to Right) Front Row: Al Borum, Larry Browdus. Bill Haikelt. Al Irzyk, Bob Marble. Carl 
Wachter, Ron Karpinsky. Bob Blackman, Ken Dunn. Ken Wall. Second Row: Mgr. Bill Green, Ken 
LeVassuer, Bob Wheeler, Ed Dunley. Bob Kleystuber, Jerry Snodgrass, Pat Hartman, Denis DeWitt, 
Aldridge Newby, Nevel Pearson. Dave Borum, Mgr. A. Riveria. Third Row : John Gillispie, Dana Carver, 
Mike Cain, Mike Karpinsky, Vern Hartman, Dave Hogan. David Wilson. Scott Shively, Steve Schuler, 
John Good, Bill Brown. Fourth Row: Mims Jones. John Norwalk. Steve Fountain. Hayward McKinney, 
Stan Newton, Bradley Kight, Steve Hale, Ray Oakman, Andy Sheppherd. Paul Wallace. 



Doing What Comes Naturally 

By Thomas E. Shaffer, M. D. 

The more we learn about adolescents the more we 
recognize the fact that vigorous activity and compe- 
tition are vital to teen-age growth and development in 
all spheres: physical, psychological, and social. In 
stressing tlie importance of competition for youth, 
Donovan F. Ward, MD, immediate past president of 
the American Medical Association, said in a recent 
speech, "Competition is a part of life. To avoid com- 
petition would be to vegetate. Within limits, there is 
nothing wrong w.th competition. But I want to stress 
the importance of the qualifying words — within lim- 
its." 

"There has u;idoubtedly been an excess of specula- 
tion and condemnation su- rounding competitive ath- 
letics among adolescents, when there should have 
been more consideration for ways to make the best of 
the situation. Adolescents are simply going to com- 
pete, with or without sanction. The positive approach 
of assuring adequate safeguards for no m^l growth 
and development and prevention of injury is prefer- 
able to the negative attitude of restrictio.i and disap- 
proval. Larson and McMahan furnish some reassur- 
ances about one of the features of adolescent sports 
which have disturbed physicians. They point out that 
growing bones are indeed vulnerable to injury but not 
to the degree some experts have suggested. These au- 
thors further state that competent medical supervision 
of young athletes, through early diagnosis and treat- 
ment, controls the dreaded permanent damage. 

Our concerns should be aimed at the way in which 
sports are conducted more than at the adolescents' 
penchant for competitive, strenuous play. There are 
emotional and physiological risks involved in highly 
organized interscholastic sports when high-pressure 
"big league" atmosphere is permitted. There is rela- 
tively little exposure to harm in competitive sports, 
however, where good leadership, medicaj supervision, 
and acceptable educational aims are insisted upon. 
We should require adequate safeguards for hesdth, 
whether the sports are conducted within the school 
system or on community playgrounds. 



First and foremost is competent medical care by 
physicians who understand the characteristics of 
young people and the qjalifications for participation 
in the various sports as well as management of 
emergencies and treatment of athletic injuries. 

The public, and parents especially, have a right to 
look to physicians for advice about the kinds of sports 
which are desirable and the recommended health 
standards. Careful attention should be given to match- 
ing or grouping youngsters on the basis of physical 
maturity to obtain fair competition and avoid unneces- 
sary injury. 

There are additional safeguards for the health of 
young athletes which require some medical supervi- 
sion. One of these is the conditioning program which, 
though often overlooked, is absolutely necessaiy be- 
fore hard practice and games are started. 

Another responsibility of physicians is in advising 
on purchase and fitting of high-quality protective 
equipment. When medical supervision is combined 
with intelligent coaching and good officiating, and 
when a wide variety of sports is available to .satisfy 
ciiildren of all levels of development and competence, 
a program which all physicians could approve will 
result. 

— AMA Journal 



Coach-of-the-Year Clinic 

The 1967 Kodak Coach-of-the-Year Football Clinic, 
featuring some of the greatest names in the coaching 
fraternity, will be held JanuEuy 21 and 22 at the 
Chase-Park Plaza Hotel, St. Louis, according to Clinic 
Manager Bob Davis. 

'Siis faculty for the chnic, one of ten to be held 
around the nation for college and high school coaches, 
will include Duffy Daugherty of Michigan State Uni- 
versity, Bud Wilkinson, former University of Okla- 
homa coach, and the collegiate Coach-of-the-Year, to 
be selected by ballots of the 2,300-member American 
Football Coaches Association. In past years, the clinic, 
sponsored by the Eastman Kodak Company under the 
sanction of the A.F.C.A., has attracted the cream of 
the nation's collegiate coaches. 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR DECEMBER, 1966 



Paee Eleven 



BELFRY — CLASS AA, REGION 4, CHAMPION 




<Left to Right) Front Row: Mgr. Roger Taylor, Robert Paul Vipperman, Johnny King, Ikey McCoy, 
Gary Scott. David King, Jim Lockard, James Slater, David Phillips, Stanley Tannyhill, Dennis Van, 
Jerry Boggs. Second Row: Coach Frank Allara, Robert Taylor. Jim Sullivan, Paul May, Randy 
Scott, Freddy Warf, Donald Gillman, Robert York, Freddy Adkins, Walley Bevins, James Stepp, Donald 
Hackney, Terry Scott, Coach Albert Vipperman. Third Row: Coach Tommy D. Runyon, Danny Hat- 
field, Scotty Smith. Leon Guyton. James Runyon, Ronnie Brooks, Jasper Webb, Randy Runyon, 
Ronald Scott, Calvin Durham, Lanny Murphy, Lesley Estepp. Coach Milard Bevins. Fourth Row: 
Tom Bill McNeil, Roger May James Cole, Ronnie Hatfield. Albert Stafford. Scotty Moore. Sammy 
Stacy, Harold Borders. Charles Hensley. Michael Smith, Glenn AUred. James Hatfield, Teddy Smith. 



"The clinic is designed by coaches for coaches," 
S£dd Bob Davis. "In addition to detaiUng the plays 
and techniques that have welded their teams into 
football powerhouses, faculty members will be avail- 
able to exchange shoptalk on an individual basis 
throughout the clinic." 

Last year more than 7,000 coaches participated in 
the 10 two-day sessions. 



The Importance of Athletics 

By Ath. Dir. Don Sparks 
Parkway (Mo.) School District 

Athletics play an important part in the educational 
growth of Parkway pupils. We believe that participa- 
tion in athletics, both as a player and as a student 
spectator, enriches each student's educational experi- 
ence. The privilege of such participation carries with 
it responsibilities to the school, to the team, to the 
student body, to the community, and to the student 
himself. The athletic experiences themselves add to 
the knowledge, skills, and emotional i)attems of each 
student, making him a better person and a better 
citizen. 

We therefore feel that athletics hold a unique place 
in our educational curriculum and that it provides 
our boys and girls with lasting values. The annual 
budget of our fast-growing school district has many 
demands on it, with no provision for superficial offer- 
ings. The athletic program has several important di- 
mensions — physical development, character-building, 
personcdity improvement, group cooperation. Through 
these avenues it makes a solid contribution to total 
educational growth. 

The following letter which head football coach Jack 
WeUs received recently from a parent describes the 
positive effect of athletics in one Parkway home: 

Dear Coach Wells: 

It is with a genuine feeling of pleasure that we 
write you to express our appreciation for your efforts 
on behalf of the Parkway Colts. 

When our son decided he wanted to try out for the 
team we were not altogether happy with his decision. 



We felt that the only thing a football coach worried 
about was "win that game"— and very little emphasis 
was put on the moral, spiritual and ethical develop- 
ment of the boys. However, as he was fortunate 
enough to make the squad we determined to attend 
all games and share the expericence with him. 

As we grew with the team we began to realize that 
the football club was the core of a real school par- 
ticipation event— with the cheerleaders, the Marching 
Band, the Parkettes and the Pep Qub all contributing 
in establishing a fine school ' spirit. We also realize 
the boys were being developed into men who could 
suffer their lumps on and off the field. Feel the pride 
of victory and the bitterness of defeat. That you must 
work even harder in practice when no one is Cheering 
you on. That team spirit, hard work and determina- 
tion were the true requirements for victory. 

We feel this was a productive two way street, we 
gave you a very good 'boy' and you gave us back a 
fine young 'man.' 

To yourself and your excellent team of assistant 
coaches we offer our sincere and heartfelt thante lor 
a job well done. 

—Missouri H. S. Activ. Journal 



Points of Wisdom 

1. The coach who controls his team helps the offi- 
cial to control the game. 

2. The team is as good as its coach, the game is 
as good as its official. Both actually work toward the 
success of the game. Therefore, both should work as 
a team. 

3. A good team can look better with good officiat- 
ing. Therefore, cooperation toward better officiating 
helps the good team. 

4. The official and coach are both striving toward 
success through excellent achievement. The coach 
teaches his players to play well. The official encour- 
ages them to play well through good afficiating. 

5. The official can do a better job when he is not 
badgered or intimidated. The coach can do a better 
job when he is not provoked or needled. Both should 



Page Twelve 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR DECEMBER, 1966 



Season's 
Greetings 



*^U^ fCi4ix^de4t Qa^ttpjotuf^ 



GENERAL AGENT 



W. E. KINGSLEY 



121-123 LAFAYETTE AVENUE 
P. O. BOX 7100 



J. E. McCREARY, Mgr. 

Life Department 

LEXINGTON, KY. 



CHARLES C. PRICE 
PHONE 254-4095 



work toward preventing this. 

6. Coaciies and officials who back up each other 
need not back off from spectators or players. 

7. Coaching is a public trust; so is officiating. Both 
work for the welfare of the boy. 

8. Players look good when the coach and official 
look good. Bizarre incidents and arguments take at- 
tention and credit away from the players. 

9. The coach who wants an official to favor his 
team, and the official who does so, are both guilty 
of premeditated cheating. 

10. Good officiating complements good coaching. 
Both know and interpret rules and techniques simi- 
larly. 

11. The coach's job is to teach; the official's to 
arbitrate. Neither should encroach on each other's 
duties. 

12. The coach and official are worthy of the utmost 
in respect. However, they must earn this respect 
through their actions. 

13. The coach and official who live by the rules are 
apt to live right on the field or floor. 

14. To get others to do what you want them to do 
you must see things throug'h their eyes. Try to win an 
agreement, not an argument. 

15. The coach and official set the example; players 
foUow it. 

16. Dignified coaches and officials do not resort to 
childish regressions and behavior. Their efforts are 
absorbed in helping the boys to become men. 

17. The coach who creates better working condi- 
tions for officials attracts better officials. 



18. The official is a judge who prevents persecu- 
tion; he should not be the object of it. 

19. An alibi is like a crutch. It is only for the lame 
and the weak. 

20. Think big and your results wUl be big. 

— ^From lAABO Sportorials 



FILMS 



Golf 

SAVING STROKES WITH SAM SNEAD, s-c-a, 1 reel, 
$2.00 
Golf champion Sam Snead illustrates his grip, his 
stance, his swing on each of several types of golf situ- 
ations. Slow motion and "freeze" shots help to clarify 
the instruction. Shots and driver, brassie, and various 
irons for difficult lies are illustrated and finally his 
putting technique is shown. 

Tennis 

ADVANCED TENNIS, e-j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $1.50 

While working with a tennis pupil, BiU Tilden nar- 
rates and demonstrates, showing advanced techniques 
of tennis. 

BEGINNING TENNIS, e-j-s-c-a, V-k reels, (14 min.), 
$2.50 

Shows how the tennis instructor teaches tennis to be- 
ginning and advanced students. Includes an analysis 
of the basic fundamentals of tennis — serving, fore- 
hand and backhand drive, forehand and backhand 
voUey, and the smash. Shows actual play situations in 
which these fundamentals are emphasized, and also 
includes individual demonstration and analysis. 




UTCLIFFE'S 



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FOR COMPLETE ASSORTMENT 

FOR YOUR SELECTION. 



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Basketballs 



RAWLINGS 

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WILSON 

WILSON 



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sec 

100 
B 1200 
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TOIJRXAME^T NEEDS 

ORDER NOW 
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For Fast Service For In-Stock Merchandise 
Send Your Order To 

THE SUTCLIFFE COMPANY 



INCORPORATED 



115 So. 7+h Street 



LOUISVILLE, KENTUCKY 40202 



^-f pAYSTOJ Ij^ 




HUNTS ATHLETIC GOODS CO., INC. 

Phone CHapel 7-1941 

MAYFIELD, KENTUCKY 

CHRISTMAS — 1966 

Dear Customers and Friends: 

We at Hunt's want to take this time to thank you for 
the opportunity of serving you, given us through the 
past years. 

If in any way we have been successful in making your 
job as Coach, Principal or Athletic Director easier 
throughout the past year, then we feel that our efforts 
have not been in vain. 

We are at this Holiday Season reminding you that you 
have the very best wishes for the Happiest of Holidays 
from us at Hunt's and may 1967 bring good health and 
good fortune to all of you and yours. 

Very truly yours, 

HUNT'S ATHLETIC GOODS CO., INC. 

WADE BURLESON 
ROY BOYD 
JIM MITCHELL 
C. A. BYRN, JR. 
N. L. USREY 
ELIZABETH RULE 
DORIS MITCHELL 
EMILY BYRN 
H. S. BOMAR 
BILLY FARMER 
SONDRA POTTS 
JENNY SIMPSON 




CLASS A STATE CHAMPION DAYTON 



: i*^ 1^ jp. d 






-^iJTKi^^T 







(Left to Right) Front Row: Ass't Coach James Ullman, Fred Wilbnrn, Joe Fowee, Terry Fageley, 
Dennis Fergruson. Wayne Fryman, John Fowee, James Parker, John Wiseman, Bill Fleischman, Mike 
Fry, Dave Shelton, Mgrr. Larry Legner, Ass't Coach Terry Lightfoot, Head Coach Ray King. Second Row: 
Ath. Dir. George Houston, Mgr. Tom Williams, Larry Wiseman, David Wever, Ray Rosse, Herb Eddy, 
Dale King, Ken Richardson, Don Barth, Paul Ilg, Sam Wilbam, Barry Volkering, Dme Ferguson, Tom 
Fowee, Ass't Coach Dan Bash, Ass*t Coach Charles Highfield. Third Row: Coach Frank Lyons, Ass't 
Coach Tom Hood, Mgr. Tom Uphus, Fred Eddy, Larry Knuckles, James Stewart, Carlis Turner, Bill 
Bnschard, Rocky Wiefering, Dan Fowee, Sam Harpold, Ken Miller, Bob Montgomery, Bill Richardson, 
Alan Ramsey, Ernie Brooks. 



Dayton 13-HighIands 28 
Dayton 35-Simon Kenton 6 
Dayton 59-Owen County 
Dayton 37- Ludlow 19 
Dayton 40-Beechwood 



Dayton 27-Dixie Heights 6 
Dayton 18-Boone County 
Dayton 12-Campbell County 14 
Dayton 14-BeIlevne 19 
Dayton 14-LIoyd 



PLAYOFFS 

Dayton 13-M.M.L 7 
Dayton 20-Pineville 19 
Dayton 6-RussellyilIe 2 



Official Otean of tlie 

KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION 



January, 1967 



Conference Standings 



North Central Kentucky Conference 









— -zt 




Eminence 


4 










Barren Rivei Eight-Man 


Conference 


Oldham Co. 
CarroU Co. 


3 
2 


1 

2 








Cavema 
Hiseville 


8 
6 




2 









Henry Co. 
Owen Co. 


1 



3 

4 








Park City 


6 


2 

















Austin Tracy 
Temple Hill 


3 

2 


5 
6 








Northeastern Kentucky Conference 




North Warren 


2 


6 







McKell 


5 










Gamaliel 


1 


7 







Russell 
Boyd Co. 


3 
3 


1 
2 


1 






Big Eight Conference 






Raceland 


1 


2 


2 




Henderson Co. 


5 










Louisa 


1 


3 


1 




Daviess Co. 


3 


] 


1 




Wurtland 





5 







Owensboro Cath. 


£i 


2 


1 














Owensboro 


2 


■J 







Northern Kentucky Athletic Conference 


Henderson 


2 


3 

















Union County 





5 







Highlands 
Holmes 


7 

4 




1 






28.00 
21.00 


Blue Grass Conference 




Dayton 


5 


3 





19.44 


Berea 


4 










Lloyd 


5 


2 





19.28 


Country Day 


4 










Bellevue 


5 


4 





18.88 


Sayre 


3 


2 







Campbell Co. 


5 


3 


1 


'18.88 


iVIt. Vernon 


2 


3 







Ludlow 


3 


4 





15.71 


Burgii. 


" 


4 


1 




Dixie Heights 


4 


6 





15.00 


Falmouth 





4 


1 




Beechv.ood 


1 


3 





15.00 


Central Kentu 


icky Conference 




Boon- Co. 


2 


6 





12.50 


Henry Clay 


6 





^\ 


2hOC 


;<ew]"u 


n 


c 


-1 


11.66 


Frankfort 


6 


1 


u 


26.00 


Simii. i-^enton 


1 


C 


6 


11.42 


Anderson 


5 


1 





23.00 












DanvUle 


5 


1 


'^ 


-r.-oo 


South Kentucky Conference 




Georgetown 


6 


3 





^l.CO 


RussellvUle 


3 





c 




Woodford Co. 


4 


3 





li..29 


Franklin-Simpson 


2 


1 







iVI. M. I. 
Standford 


3 
5 


2 

2 







19.00 
18.57 


Bowling Green 
Glasgow 






2 
2 


1 
1 




Mt. Sterling 


5 


3 





18.13 












Somerest 
Garrard Co. 


3 
3 


3 
3 






16.67 
15.00 


Southern Kentucky Athletic Conference 


Madison 


3 


5 





15.00 


Campbellsville 


4 










Jessamine Co. 


3 


6 





13.33 


Tcnipkinsville 


3 


1 







Paris 


2 


4 





13.33 


Glasgow 


2 


2 







Nicholas Co. 


1 


5 





11.66 


Greensburg 


1 


3 







Harrodsburg 


1 


7 





11.13 


Metcalfe Co. 





4 







ShelbyviUe 





5 





10.00 












Irvine 





7 





10.00 


Southeastern Kentucky Conference 




Cumberland Valley Conference 




Corbin 


4 





1 


27.50 


Lynch 


3 










Pineville 


6 





2 


27.00 


Evarts 


2 


1 







London 


6 


1 





27.00 


Cumberland 


1 


2 







Harlan 


3 


2 


1 


20.60 


James A. Cawood 





3 







Middlesboro 


4 


2 





20.00 


Eastern Kentucky 


Mountain Conference 


Williamsburg 


5 


4 





17.80 


Fleming Neon 


5 










BeU Co. 


3 


5 


1 


16.70 


Belfry 


5 










Lynn Camp 


2 


4 


1 


15.70 


Elkhorn City 


4 


1 







Hazel Green 


2 


4 





15.00 


Jenkins 


3 


2 







Knox Central 


2 


8 





15.00 


Hazard 


2 


3 







Whitley Co. 





7 





10.00 


Pikeville 


2 


3 

















Whitesburg 


1 


4 







Western Kentucky 


Athletic Conference 


Wheelwright 


1 


4 

















M. C. Napier 


1 


5 







Hopkinsville 


7 








24.29 


Mid-Kentucky Conference 




Russellville 
Caldwell County 


7 
7 



1 






22.66 
22.16 


Bardstown 


4 








22.50 


Fulton 


4 


1 





20.00 


Old Ky. Home 
Lebanon 


3 
2 


1 
2 






18.75 
15.00 


Franklin-Simpson 
Mayfield 


4 
4 


3 
3 






19.29 
17.86 


Washington Co. 





3 





10.00 


Fort Campbell 


4 


3 





17.14 


Shepherdsville 





3 





10.00 


Murray 


4 


5 





16.67 


Mid-State 


Conference 






Christian County 


2 


2 





15.00 


* Bourbon Co. 


3 





1 




Paducah Tilghman 


3 


3 





15.00 


'Harrison Co. 


3 





1 




Bowling Green 


1 


6 





14.25 


Bryan Station 


2 


2 







Crittenden County 


1 


6 





11.43 


Clark County 


1 


3 







Trigg County 


1 


7 





11.25 


Franklin County 





4 







Madisonville 





5 





10.00 


*Co-champions 










Warren County 





4 





10.00 



The Kentucky High School Athlete 

Official Organ of the 

Kentucky High School Athletic Association 



VOL. XXIX— NO. 6 



J.WU.VRY, 1967 



H.OO Pe Year 



Early Season Basketball Questions 



EDITOR NOTE: These rulings do not set aside nor 
modify any rule. They are interpretations for some of 
the early season situations which have been presented. 

Clifford B. Fagan 

1. Play; Bl is guarding Al. Al starts a dribble 
drive for the basitet with Bl following and maintaining 
a legal position. Bl is moving quickly when he is ob- 
structed by the screen which has been set legally be- 
hind him and which he could "Ot see. The impact is 
such as to displace thj icicener. A2. 

Ruling: The contact by Bl lo n<n an infraction pro- 
vided Bl stopped his advance as .jnon as the contact 
was made, and provided Bl did not a^'ain make con- 
tact with A2 after he had stopped. This is a situation 
in which B had to move swiftly and with speed in or- 
der to "stay with his man," and due to the fact that 
the screen by A2 was behind Bl, the contact is, of 
itself, not an infraction. This is incidental contact. 

2. Play: As the 4th quarter ends, the score is: (a) 
tied; or (b) Team A 61— Team B 60. Al commits a 
foul before the ball becomes dead; or clearly after 
the ball becomes dead. 

Ruling: If the foul occurs before tthe ball becomes 
dead, the free throw is attempted as a part of the 4th 
period. This applies in either (a) or (b). If tlie foul is 
clearly after the ball has bcome dead, an e.xtra peri- 
od is played in (ai and this ex'.ca. period begins with 
the throwing of the Lr°e tbxow o^- throws. In (b), the 
score is not tied at Lhe a/.ie the ball becomes dead 
and there is no reason for playing the extra period 
unless the free throw or throws result in a tie score. 
Consequently, in (b), the free throw or throws are at- 
tempted as a part of the 4th period and unless the 
free throw or throws result in a tie score, no extra 
period is played. 

3. Play: With 8 seconds remaining in the 4th quar- 
ter, Al scores a field goal to make the score 87 to 86 
in favor of Team B. When it appears that Team B is 
not going to rush the ball into play, Al requests a 
time-Liut: (a) immediately after he scores the field 
goal; or (b) after Bl has secured the ball and is hold- 
ing it out of bounds; or (c) just as Bl starts his 
throw-in v motion). 

Ruling: Official should grant Al's request for a 
time-ouf in (a) and (b) and ignore the request in (c). 

4. Play: While dribbling, Al bats the ball over the 
hf'ad of Bl and then pushes the ball to the floor to 
continue the dribble. 

Ruling: Legal air dribble. One air dribble is legal 
during any single dribble play. 

5. Play: A player on offense (A) or defense (B) 
reaches out and touches an opponent for the purpose 
of keeping in "contact" with the opponent. 

Ruling; Personal foul. Such contact is not classified 
as incidental. Incidental contact is that contact which 
results from a legal act. Touching an opponent to 
maintain "contact" (or tagging as it is sometimes 
called) is purposeful, by design and gives the playe"- 
so doing an advantage not intended by the rules. The 
player on defense (B) is moving with his opponent and 



is extending his arm to "feel" an anticipated screen 
thereby alerting himself (B) to the position ol the 
screener (A), making it possible for B to avoid the 
screen. This is oushing if B so contacts a legal 
screener. 

6. Plav: Al i- fouled in the act of making a field 
goal altc-mpt. P'^.e try is not successful. His first free 
throw liy is ;nissed but through error the clock is 
siarU'd and play is continued. May the error be cor- 
rectL'd? 

Ruling. The error is interpreted to have occurred 
vshile the clock was stopped. 

7. Play: A technical foul is cissessed against Team 
A. 136 replaces Bl and makes the free throw attempt. 
After the attempt, B7 enters to replace B6 

Ruling; Legal procedure. 

8. Play: Field goal try by Al is succps-sful, bring 
ing the score to Team A 80, Team B 81 ^Vith 4 sec- 
onds of remaining time, Bl takes the ball out cil 
bounds and makes no attempt to put it in play. Al 
requests time. 

Ruling: The request of Al should be granted because 
he is comp^yuio ' -th the provisions under wiiicli a 
time-out is grante;. Only if a change of status of the 
ball is imminent, tha: is, if Bl had started to makt a 
throw-in, would tlie request of Al be ignored. 

9. Play; (a) A2 climbs upon the shoulders of Al; 
or (b) B2 climbs upon the shoulders of Bl. That is, 
teammates of either the offensive or defensive team 
take the position indicated. 

Ruling: Technical foul in either (a) ' (b). This is 
an unsportsmanlike idCtic, as listed i. Rule 10-5. 
Item d. 

10 Play: Team A requests and is ffranted a 
charged time-out. At the expira'lon of 30 seconds, 
Team A indicates to the referee that il desires to re- 
siune play. 

Ruling: Because the time-out was charged to Team 
A, Team A has tae privilege of having play resumed 
before the expiration of the time-out period. Team H 
is required to respond to the call for play when Team 
A wants to proceed. In other words, Team E is not 
privileged to take .i f"ll minute time-out •.vl-en it is 
charged to Team A :jr.d Team A wamts t<- ri-_,ame play 
before time is up. 

11. Play: Ther„' ic a 3-foot re.s'cnining lint at the 
end of the court, the end "'le of which is flush against 
the wall. The .lome tearr -.as r: "groimd rule' which 
would require that the ja.\ be put in play from the 
side of the court wheneve '.ne official rales specify 
that the 'arow-in be made "rom behind the end line. 

Rulinp. The "ground rule' is illegal. The rules pro- 
vide d. finite coverage for this kind of situation. It is 
not possible for the home team to change the rule. 
Nei'jier may a rule be set aside by mutual agreement. 
T'.e restraining line is used at the end of the court in 
tnLs case. 

12. Play: While an attempt for a field goal by Al 
is in flight, Bl strikes the backboard with his hand. 
causing it to vibrate. The ball hits the rim of the bas- 

(Continued on Page Seventeen) 



Page Two 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR JANUARY. 1967 



JANUARY, 1967 



VOL. XXK— NO. 6 



Pnblished monthly, except Jane and July, by the Kentucky 

Higrh School Athletic Association 

Office of Publication, Lexington. Ky. 48501 

Second class postage paid at Lexington, Kentucky. 

Editor THEO. A. SANFORD 

Assistant Editor J. B. MANSFIELD 

Lexington, Ky. 
BOARD OF CONTROL 

President Sherman Gish (1963-67). Greenville 

Vice-President Don Davis (1963-67), Independence 

Directors — Morton Combs (1964-68), Carr Creek; Ralph C. 
Dorsey (1966-70), Horse Cave; Preston Holland (1965-69). 
Murrav; Don R. Rawlings (1965-69), Danville; Foster J. 
Sanders (1966-70), Louisville; Gran C. Teater (1964-68). 
Paintsville. 

Subscription Rate $1.00 Per Tear 

jtiom the Commissione'i s (Jfflce 



REPORTS PAST DUE 

1. 1966 Football Participation List 

2. School's Eeport on Football Officials 

3. Official's Report on Schools (Football) 



Approved and Certified Officials 

A large number of K.H.S.A.A. registered officials 
(lualified for the advanced rating of Approved and 
Certified as a result of tiie National Federation bas- 
ketball examination which was given in Kentucky on 
December 5, 1966. The Approved rating does not carry 
carry forward from year to year, but must be earned 
each year. After an official has received the Certified 
rating, he keeps this rating provided that he attends 
the clinic for the current year and worked in at least 
twelve first team high school basketball games during 
the previous year. Only officials receiving these high- 
er ratings are eligible to work in the regional tourna- 
ments. Only Certified officials who are residents of 
Kentucky are eligible to work in the State Tourna- 
ment. 

Basketball officials who (jualified for advanced rat- 
ings during the current season are as follows: 

CERTIFIED OFFICIALS 



Alexander, Rex 
Allen, Nelson R. 
BeU, Clarence T. 
Bowling, Roy 
Boyles, Paul E. 
Bradshaw, Bill 
Brizendine, Vic 
Brown, E. C. 
Brown, John W. "Scoop" 
Browning, Earl E. 
Bruner, Jack C. 
Bins, Nathaniel A. 
Combs, Keith A. 
Combs, F. D. 
Conley, George 
Conley, Ted L. 
Cooksey, Marvin 
Crosthwaite, John S., Jr. 
Cunningham, Julian R. 
Davis, Harold T. 
Davis, Ralph E. 
DeVary, BUI 
Disken, James W. 
Dobson, Kenneth 
Dorsey, James 
Dotson, John B. 
Drake, Richard R. 
DriskeU, Earl, Jr. 



Duerson, Wm. R. 
Duff, Earl 

DuvaU, Thomas J., Sr. 
Fades, James M. 
Edwards, Don 
Elliott, CarroU L. 
Emery, George A. 
Ferrell, Doctor T. 
Flynn, Bobby 
Foster, Bob 
Freese, Oliver T. 
Fritz, Sherman 
Fuller, John R., Jr. 
Gardner, Howard E. 
Gettler, John F. 
Gilbert, Gerald L. 
Golden, BiUy Joe 
Goley, James E. 
Green, Walt 
Gour, Bob 
Gustaison, Al, Jr. 
Hagan, Joe 
Hammons, Norman 
Hamed, Victor C. 
Haynes, John 
Hewitt, R. T. 
Hill, Ea-1 F. 
Hinton, Henry E., Jr. 



Hofstetter, Joe 
Howard, Carl 
Hunley, Neil P. 
Huter, Jim 
Hyatt, Bob 
Invin, Charles R. 
Jenkins, James 
Johnson, James M. 
Johnson, Wm. Bernard 
Johnson, Walter 
Kimmel, Jerry 
King, Jim 
Knight, Bill 
Laubheimer, Donald T. 
Lee, Robert L. 
Long, Bill 
Louden, Hubert 
Loudy, Kenneth 
Lowe, Gene T. 
Lucas, Gene 
Lusby, George H. 
Lytle, Wm. Price 
McAnelly, David 
McClure, W. S. 
McCoy, Hayse 
McGehee, G. K. 
McLane, Albert I. 
Mahan, Carle 
Maines, George 
May. E. B., Jr. 
Meade, Foster "Sid' 
Meredith, Denny 
Meyer, IBud 
Miller, Bob 
IVIiller, Ferrel 
MUler, Rex J. 
Mitchell, Billy N. 
Moore, Robert 
Moore, Roy 
Morse^ Richard K. 
Moser, Rudy C. 
Mudd, Ed 
Neal, Gene 
Nevil, Vernon E. 
Nixon, James W. 
Nord, Ed 
Omer, Harold G. 
O'Nan, Norman 
Padgett, R. K. 
Peay, Curtis 
Pergrem, Bernard 
Perry, James E. 

APPROVED 

Benzinger. Joseph 
Blevins, Boone, Jr. 
Brock, Alben 
Brown, Bill C. 
Butcher, Douglas 
Butcher, Granville "Bo" 
Butler, Bob 
Carlberg, John H. 
Cox, Alva J. 
Cravens, Robert 
Dame, L. J. 
Denham, Ronald 
Dieterle, Owen M. 
Fey, AUen 
Finley, Albert R. 
Gaither, Gene 
Gentry, Dale J. 
Graham, James 
Hammock, Don L. 
Harper, Robie 

(Continued on 



Phelps, Ralph "Rudy" 
Points, Charles 
Prather, Wilbur E. 
Radjunas, Stan 
Rawlings, Harold 
Reed, Charles R. 
Reed, Gordon 
Reinhardt, Myron 
Rexroat, Jerry L. 
Ricketts, C. O. 
Ring, William H. 
Ritter, Goebel 
Rogers, Howard 
Roller, Otis 
Rubarts, Leland G. 
Russell, Allen W. 
St. Clair, Robert L., Jr. 
Schlich, Paul E. 
Settle, Roy G. 
Shaw, Earl 
Small, BiU 
Smith, Wayne N. 
Smith, Willard N. 
Smith, WiUiam E. 
Smith, Wyatt Jack 
Speck, IVLiohael E. 
Spencer, Irvin E. 
Steenken, William R. 
Stephenson, Hcirry S. 
Stiff, Maurice 
Stikeleather, Qyde L. 
Strain, Richard 
Strong, Amett 
Sullivan, Don C. 
Tarlton, Thomas 0. 
Taylor, Ed 
Thompson, Jacdc 
Thompson, Ralph 
Tinsley, Marion R. 
Varble, William 
Vettiner, Charlie 
Weaver, Ray 
Wesche. James A. 
White, David B. 
Williams, Roger 
Winchester, Roy L. 
Winfrey, Shelby 
Wise, Bm V. 
Wise, Jack 
WcKjds, Gene 
Wurtz, Emil 

OFFICIALS 

Harris, BiUy 
Harrison, John L. 
Holt, Robert E. 
Holthouser, Ora L. 
Horsman, BUI, Sr. 
Howard, Bob 
Jent, Riciiard 
Johnson, Ronald L. 
Jones, William L. 
KeUy, Charles 
Kuhl, Lawrence 
Leonard, Dale E. 
Ule, Clyde F. 
McCargo, Frank 
McPike, Ray S., Jr. 
Madon, Robert L. 
Maynard, Joe E. 
Metzger, Don 
Montgomery, Chester 
Mooneyhan, James 
Page Eleven) 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR JANUARY, 1967 



Page Three 



1966-67 MEMBERSHIP IN THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION 


School 


Address 


Tel. No. 


Principal 


Coach 






REGION 1 




D. 1 Carlisle County 


R. 3, Bardwell 


628-5411 


0. J. Mitchell 


Bobby Hoskins 


Fulton 


Fulton 


472-1741 


J. M. Martin 


Scott Boehringer 


Flilton County 


Route 4, Hickman 


236-3168 


Harold Garrison 


Dale Alexaiiaer 


Hickman County 


Clinton 


653-5461 


James H. Phillips 


Faurest Coogle 


D. 2 Ballard Memorial 


R. 1, Barlow 


665-5151 


Robert G. Fiser 


Albert L. Norris 


Heath 


Paducah 


488-1345 


Larry Powell 


Frank Wright 


Lone Oak 


Paducah 


444-5542 


John Robinson 


Jack McKinney 


Paducah Tilghman 


Paducah 


443-6296 


Bradford D. Mutchler 


Barney Thweatt 


Reidland 


R. 8, Paducah 


898-2441 


Richard L. Winebarger 


Billy Brown 


St. Mary 


Paducah 


442-1681 


Bro. Ignatius 


Jim Voight 


D. 3 Cuba 


R. 1, Mayfield 


382-3400 


W. W. Chumbler 


Gene Mason 


Fancy Farm 


Fancy Farm 


623-4349 


Sr. Helen Constance 


Bob McCord 


Farmington 


Farmington 


345-2171 


James A. Baker 


Joe Mikez 


Lowes 


Lowes 


674-5333 


Howard V. Reid 


Scott Schlosser 


Mayfield 


Mayfield 


247-4461 


Barkley Jones 


Don Sparks 


Sedalia 


Sedalia 


328-3241 


James A. Pickard 


Ken Wray 


Symsonia 


Symsonia 


851-3231 


Cecil Reid 


Donald Butler 


Wingo 


Wingo 


376-2236 


C. W. Jones 


Bill Owens 


D. 4 Benton 


Benton 


527-9091 


A. N. Duke, Jr. 


Joe Warren 


Calloway County 


R. 2, Murray 


753-5479 


Howard R. Crittenden 


Roy Cothran 


Murray 


Murray 


753-5202 


Eli Alexander 


Bobby Toon 


Murray University 


Murray 


762-3824 


Vernon E. Shown 


Garrett Beshear 


North Marshall 


Calvert Qty 


395-4400 


Robert Goheen 


Buddie Poe 


South Marshall 


R. 1, Benton 


527-2891 


William A. Cothran 


Joe Mathis 






REGION 2 




D. 5 Caldwell County 


Princeton 


365-2635 


William F. Brown 


Harold Jones 


Crittenden County 


Marion 


965-4226 


Ercel Little 


George Whitecotton 


Fredonia 


Fredonia 


545-3431 


Joseph W. Qark 


Gerald Tabor 


Livingston Central 


Burna 


988-3263 


Kenneth T. Hardin 


Don Ringstaff 


Lyon County 


Eddyville 


388-2296 


John E. Floyd 


Jerry Scott 


Trigg County 


Cadiz 


522-6653 


John Randolph 


Duke Burnett 


D. 6 Henderson 


Henderson 


826-9568 


WiUiam B. Posey 


James Smith 


Henderson County 


Henderson 


826-9056 


J. W. Duncan 


Donald Glsh 


Holy Name 


Henderson 


627-9297 


J. Francis Powers 


Robert Martin 


Providence 


Providence 


667-2411 


B. K. Lane 


Jackie Winders 


St. Vincent Acad. 


St. Vincent 


568-2611 


Sr. Raymunda 


Ronald D. McAlister 


Union County 


R. 4, Morganfield 


389-1454 


H'Earl Evans 


Earl Adkins 


Webster County 


Dixon 


639-2661 


Ivan RusseU 


Bob Bradley 


D. 7 Earlington 


Earlington 


383-55U 


Robert B. Fox 


Robert B. Fox 


MadisonvUle 


MadisonviUe 


821-2824 


Fr<;d Murray 


Charles Sutherland 


South Hopkins 


R. 1, NortonvUle 


676-3443 


David Siria 


James Beshears 


West Hopkins 


R. 1, Nebo 


249-3151 


A. 0. Richards 


Gary Moretan 


D 8 Attucks 


Hopkinsville 


885-8278 


Frank B. Simpson 


William FaUs, Sr. 


Christian County 


Hopkins ville 


886-4463 


Neal R. Tucker 


Harlan Peden 


Dawson Springs 


Dawson Springs 


797-3811 


B'll Outland 


Jerry Gamble 


Fort Campbell 


Fort Camobell 


798-2645 


Bill R. Perry 


Tom Morgan 


Hopldnsville 


HopkinsviLle 


866-3384 


Cletus Hubbs 


Roy Woolum 


Todd County Central 


Elkton 


265-2506 
REGION 


Robert N. Bush 
3 


Harold Ross 


D. 9 Calhoun 


Calhoun 


273-3264 


L. D. Knight 


Don Parson 


Daviess County 


Owensboro 


684-5285 


W. P. Wheeler 


Charles Combs 


Livermore 


Livermore 


278-2522 


Kenneth Middleton 


Carl Ashby 


Owensboro 


Owensboro 


684-7221 


Joe 0. Brown 


Bobby Watson 


Owensboro Catholic 


Owensboro 


684-3215 


Rev. Henry O'Bryan 


George Abernathy 


Sacramento 


Sacramento 


736-2343 


Donald R. Hayes 


Douglas Walsh 


St. Mary's 


WhitesviUe 


233-5253 


Sr. Thomas Veronica 


Bryce Roberts 


D. 10 Bremen 


Bremen 


522-3411 


Paul PhiUips 


Randy Swan 


Central Qty 


Central City 


754-2272 


Deknas Gish 


Jackie Day 


Drakesboro 


Drakesboro 


476-2630 


W. J. Wilcutt 


James H-'i 


Graham 


Graham 


338-1317 


L. A. Wells 


Tommy Willi.s 


GreenvUle 


Greenville 


3384650 


J. Emest Atkins 


Jerry Y. Shanks 


Hughes Kirk 


Beechmont 


476-2204 


Charles Eades 


Tomy Lyons 


Muhlenberg Central 


Powderly 


338-3550 


Lyle C. Baugh 


Bob Revo 



Page Four 


THE KENTUCKY HIGH .<^r.HOOT, ATHT,ETE FOR JANUARY, 19fi7 


School 


Address 


Tel. No. 


Principal 


Coach 


D. 11 Breckinridge County 


Harned 


756-2149 


W. 0. Jackson 


Donald R. Morris 


Fordsville 


FordsviUe 


276-3601 


Noble H. MidMff 


Don Coppage 


Frederick Fraize 


Cloverport 


788-3386 


V. M. Vibbert 


Ed Belcher 


Hancock County 


Lewisport 


927-2531 


Clifton Banks, Jr. 


Denzel Mefford 


Ohio County 


Hartford 


274-3366 


Shelby C. Forsythe, Jr. 


Ralph UnderhiU 


St. Romuald's 


Hardinsburg 


756-5504 


Sr. Florentia 


John K. CecU 


D. 12 Butler County 


Morgantown 


526-3753 


Darrell C. Hampton 


W. 0. Warren, Jr. 


Caneyville 


Caneyville 


879-4211 


Ramon Majors 


BiU Lee 


Clarkson 


Clarkson 


242-3061 


r. E. Cunningham 


Bowman Davenport 


Edmonson County 


Brownsville 


597-2932 


John M. Lane 


Billy Clemmons 


Grayson County Cath. 


Leitchfield 


242-4847 


Sr. Jamesina 


Richard Ewing 


Leitchfield 


Leitchfield 


2594175 
REGION 


John H. Taylor 
4 


Cecil Goff 


D. 13 Adairville 


Adairville 


539-7711 


Jesse L. Richards 


Ralph Townsend 


Auburn 


Auburn 


542-4181 


Tom Barrett 


Howard GorreU 


Chandler's Chapel 


R. 2, Auburn 


542-4139 


Morris Shelton 


Ivan G. Pogue 


Lewisburg 


Lewisburg 


755-'^! 91 


BiU McKinney 


Bob BirdwhisteU 


Olmstead 


Olmstead 


734-4621 


R. E. Price 


James Milam 


RusselhTlle 


RusseUville 


726-6434 


R. D. Reynolds 


John McCarley 


D. 14 Alva ton 


Alvaton 


843-8067 


Robert Morgan 


Dallas Embry 


Bowling Green 


Bowling Green 


842-1674 


Chester C. Redmon 


Larry Doughty 


Bristow 


Bowhng Green 


842-1960 


Kenneth Harvey 


Lowell Hammers 


Franklin-Simpson 


Franklin 


5864763 


Don Stephenson 


John Price 


North Warren 


Smiths Grove 


563-2041 


Aaron Turner 


Ron Chumbley 


Richardsville 


Richardsville 


777-3232 


GUbert Richardson 


Ronald Beckham 


University 


Bowling Green 


745-3852 


James A. Carpenter 


Doug Smith 


Warren County 


Bowling Green 


842-7302 


Jacob Stagner 


Andrew Renick 


D. 15 Allen County 


Scottsville 


237-3841 


T. C. Simmons 


Tommy Long 


Austin-Tracy 


Austin 


434-8911 


Kenneth B, SidweU 


Jimmie Manion 


Glasgow 


Glasgow 


651-8801 


Earl Bradford 


Jim Richards 


Hiseville 


Hiseville 


453-2611 


F. P. Newberry 


Bob Sturgeon 


Park City 


Park aty 


749-2665 


Edwin R. Hopper 


DarreU Florence 


Scottsville 


Scottsville 


237-3751 


Bruce Stewart 


Lyle Dunbar 


Temple Hill 


R. 4, Glasgow 


427-2611 


Zeb Ricketts 


Roy Withrow 


D. 16 Clinton County 


Albany 


387-2891 


Perry C. Hay 


LJndle Castle 


Cumberland County 


Burkesville 


864-3451 


Samuel L. Smith 


Larry McDonald 


Gamaliel 


Gamaliel 


457-2341 


Edwin Steen 


Leon Mudd 


Metcalfe County 


Edmonton 


432-2481 


Norman Antle 


Russell VanZant 


Tompkinsville 


Tompkinsville 


487-6217 


Randall Grider 


Prentice Stanford 






REGION 5 




D. 17 East Hardin 


Glendale 


854-2300 


Damon Ray 


Donald Cothran 


Elizabethtown 


Elizabethtown 


765-5237 


Paul E. Kerrick 


Charles Rawlings 


EUzabethtown Cath. 


Elizabethtown 


765-5207 


Sr. Mary Anton 


Hardin McT^ne 


Flaherty 


R. 3, Vine Grove 


828-6625 


H. W. Hunt 


Don Hawkins 


Fort Knox 


Fort Knox 


4-7019 


John W. Hackett 


Bob Burrow 


Meade County 


Brandenburg 


422-3214 


Stuart Pepper 


Jim Lambert 


North Hardin 


Vine Grove 


877-2210 


James T. Alton 


Bennie Keen 


West Hardm 


Stephensburg 


862-3924 


Kenneth Riddle 


Bill Johnson 


D. 18. Caverna 


Horse Cave 


773-7951 


B. H. Weaver 


Ralph Dorsey 


Cub Run 


Cub Run 


524-2925 


Wandel Strange 


Francis W. Cook 


Hart Memorial 


HardyviUe 


528-2271 


Reathel Goff 


Bob Burris 


I-aRue County 


HodgenviUe 


358-3195 


Everett G. Sanders 


Corky Cox 


Munfordville 


Munfordville 


5244651 


H. D. Puckett 


Ray Hammers 


D. 19. Bardstown 


Bardstown 


348-5913 


John H. Branson 


Garnis Martin 


Bloomfield 


Bloomfield 


252-2311 


J. B. Sparks 


Ernest Rubv 


Old Kentucky Home 


Bardstown 


348-8473 


T. G. Florence 


Joe Holcomb 


St. Catherine 


New Haven 


549-3143 


Sr. Mary Catherine 


Michael PoUio 


St. Joseph Prep. 


Bardstown 


348-3989 


Bro. Howard 


ayde E. Smith 


Washington Co. 


Springfield 


336-3718 


Robert L. Robertson 


Michael Marks 


Willisburg 


Willisburg 


375-2217 


Z. T. Lester 


Robert B. Bottoms 


D. 20 Adair County 


Columbia 


384-2751 


Brooks Coomer 


John Burr 


CampbeUsville 


CampbeUsville 


465-8774 


Richard L. Bower 


Don Shaw 


Greensburg 


Greensburg 


932-5^31 


Eugene E. Tate 


Carl Deaton 


Lebanon 


Lebanon 


692-3441 


R. H. Brawner 


Hubert Edwards 


St. Augustine 


Lebanon 


692-2063 


Sr. Edward Mary 


James Thompson 


St. Charles 


R. 1, Lebanon 


6924578 


Sr. Charles Marie 


Don Martin 


St. Francis 


Loretto 


865-2301 


Sr. Cordelia Spalding 


Sam B. Thomas 


Taylor County 


CampbeUsville 


465-4431 


E. L. Cox 


Billy B. Smith 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR JANUARY, 1967 


Page Five 


School 


Address 


Tel. No. 


Principal 


Coach 






REGION 6 




D. 21 Bishop David 


Louisville 


4474363 


Bro. Richard Reaume 


Jim Ballard 


Butler 


Louisville 


448-4620 


H. L. Hatfield 


Robert Dotson 


Loretto 


Louisville 


778-2122 


Sr. Ann Francis 


Jean Daugherty 


Pleasure Ridge Park 


LouisviUe 


935-2428 


Bobby Green 


Gary Schaffer 


Valley 


Louisville 


937-2300 


J. C. Cantrell 


Bobby S. Pace 


Western 


Louisville 


447-3221 


John D. Brown 


Jerry Rexroat 


D. 22 Ahrens 


Louisville 


583-9711 


Lawrence A. Burdon 


J. E. Smith 


Central 


Louisville 


584-6193 


J. Waymon Hackett 


Robert Graves 


Flaget 


Louisville 


778-5528 


Bro. Hilaire 


Tom Finnegan 


Shawnee 


Louisville 


774-2353 


Robert B. Qem 


Robert Atkinson 


D. 23 DeSales 


Louisville 


368-6519 


Rev. Murray Phelan 


James Huter 


Holy Rosary Acad. 


Louisville 


361-2213 


Sr. Suzanne 


Miss Betty Dwyer 


Iroquois 


Louisville 


366-0396 


Edwin K. Binford 


Jadie Frazier 


Southern 


Louisville 


969-1331 


T. T. Knight 


William Kidd 


Thomas Jefferson 


Louisville 


969-3271 


W. D. Bruce 


Harold Andrews 


Fairdale 


Louisville 


366-1468 


Harry K. Hardin 


Clyde Copley 






REGION 7 




D. 25 duPont Manual 


Louisville 


636-1441 


Arthur J. Ries 


Lou Tsioropoulos 


Ky. Sch. for the Blind 


Louisville 


897-1583 


William E. Davis 




Louisville Coun. Day 


Louisville 


895-3452 


Patrick Boardman 


Kenneth Goldsmith 


Louisville Male 


Louisville 


582-2613Foster J. Sanders 


John Rendek 


Mercy Academy 


Louisville 


584-5589 


Sr. M. Joachim 




Presentation Acad. 


Louisville 


583-5935 


Sr. Lucina Marie 




Trinity 


Louisville 


895-9427 


A. W. Steinhauser 


W. C. Sergeant 


Ursuline Academy 


Louisville 


567-1717 


Sr. M. Columba 


Joyce Andriot 


D. 26 Angela Merici 


Louisville 


447-5911 


Sr. Mary Carmel 


Mrs. Yates 


Aquinas 


LouisvUle 


895-9411 


Malachy F. Cleary 


Paul Dezarn 


Eastern 


Middletown 


2454161 


John W. Trapp 


William B. Hoke 


Ky. H. School for Girls Louisville 


452-2163 


Mrs. Alwyn Dickerson 




Ky. Military Inst. 


Lyndon 


425-7901 


N. C. Hodgin 


Lowell R. Watson 


Sacred Heart Acad. 


Louisville 


897-1811 


Sr. George Marie 


Mrs. Lavada Larkins 


Seneca 


Louisville 


4514330 


K. B. Farmer 


Eddie Creamer 


Waggener 


Louisville 


895-0567 


Earl S. Duncan 


Roy Adams 


Westport 


Louisville 


425-2541 


V. M. Brucchieri 


William C. Olsen 


D. 27 Atherton 


Louisville 


459-3610 


Russell Garth 


Eugene Minton 


Durrett 


Louisville 


368-5831 


James C. Bruce 


Howard Stacey 


Fern Creek 


Fern Creek 


239-3267 


W. K. Niman 


Hugh Gabbard 


Louisville Col. School 


Louisville 


451-5330 


Nancy E. Kussrow 




St. Xavier 


Louisville 


636-2525 


Bro. Conrad 


Joe Reibel 






REGION 8 




D. 29 Lebanon Junction 


Lebanon Junction 


833-4626 


George E. Valentine 


Glen B. Smith 


Mt. Washington 


Mt. Washington 


538-4227 


C. L. Francis 


John F. Games 


ShepherdsvUle 


Shepherdsville 


543-7614 


Roger A. Phelps 


Tom Collins 


Taylorsville 


TaylorsviUe 


477-2230 


Harvey G. Bush 


Larry Cheek 


D. 30 Eminence 


Eminence 


8454071 


Ray C. Warmath 


J. T. Stinson 


Henry County 


New Castle 


346-8421 


Arnold S. Oaken 


Don Turner 


Shelby County 


Shelbyville 


633-2344 


Bruce Sweeney 


Bill D. Harrell 


Shelbyville 


Shelbyville 


6334869 


William McKay 


Evan Settle 


D. 31 Carroll County 


Carrollton 


732-5215 


WiUiam L. Mills 


Dalton Oak 


Gallatin County 


Warsaw 


7-5041 


James C. Wilson 


James Gainey 


Oldham County 


LaGrange 


241-4458 


A. L. Roberts 


Paul Watts 


Trimble County 


Bedford 


255-3268 


Charles Scott 


Bruce Springate 


D. 32 Georgetown 


Georgetown 


863-3805 


Robert J. Elder 


William Nutter 


Grant County 


Dry Ridge 


824-5001 


Leo H. Brewsaugh 


Carl Wenderoth 


Owen County 


Owenton 


4'?4-^509 


Cyrus Greene 


Ken Martin 


Scott County 


Georgetown 


863-2640 


Ed Sams 


John Crigler 


Williamstown 


Williamstown 


824-5771 


Earl Pfanstiel 


Tom Hatley 



Page Six 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR JANUARY, 1967 



School 


Address 


Tel. No. 


Principal 


Coach 






REGION 9 




D. 33 Boone County 


Florence 


282-2223 


Jack Clifford 


Sam Karr 


Dixie Heights 


So. Ft. MitcheU 


341-7650 


Arthur J. Walsh 


Roy McKenney 


Lloyd 


Erlanger 


341-7530 


Robert Gschwind 


Charles Perry 


St. Henry 


Erlanger 


341-9309 


Sr. Joseph Marie 


WiUiam Code 


Simon Kenton 


Independence 


356-7354 


George Edmondson 


Joe Stark 


Walton-Verona 


Walton 


485-4293 


John Shoemaker 


Jim Taylor 


D. 34 Beechwood 


So. Ft. MitcheU 


331-1220 


Thehna W. Jones 


Tom Creamer 


Covington Catholic 


Covington 


431-5351 


Bro. Donald C. McKee 


"Mote" Hils 


Holmes 


Covington 


431-3604 


H. B. Tudor 


Tom Ellis 


Holy Cross 


Covington 


431-1335 


Sr. M. Michelle 


George N. Schneider 


Ludlow 


Ludlow 


261-8211 


Arthur T. Tipton 


Robert Jones 


Notre Dame Acad. 


Covington 


261-4300 


Sr. Mary Honora 




D. 35 Bellevue 


Bellevue 


261-2980 


William M. Armstrong 


Lynn Stewart 


Dayton 


Dayton 


2614357 


Dr. W. Dwight Sporing 


Frank Lyons 


Newport 


Newport 


261-2860 


Edwin K. Burton 


Stanley Arnzen 


Newport Catholic 


Newport 


441-7100 


Br. Mark Sullivan 


Ronald Albrinck 


D. 36 Bishop Brossart 


Alexandria 


635-2108 


Rev. Joseph W. Minogue 


Donald R. Fangman 


Campbell County 


Alexandria 


635-2191 


Robert Burkich 


Ken Lehkamp 


Highlands 


Ft. Thomas 


441-1301 


Harold MiUer 


James Bradbuiy 


St. Thomas 


Ft. Thomas 


441-2211 


Sr. Rose Francis 


Kenneth Shields 


Silver Grove 


Silver Grove 


441-3873 


Robert F. Dozier 


Richard Morris 






REGION 10 




D. 37 Bourbon County 


Paris 


987-2550 


Joe E. Sabel 


Fred Creasey 


Harrison County 


Cynthiana 


234-39IL 


Paul Wright 


Jerry Jenkins 


Millersburg M. Inst. 


Millersburg 


848-3352 


W. D. Haynes 


John Pressler 


Nicholas County 


Carlisle 


477 


Ledger Howard 


BiU Mathes 


Paris 


Paris 


987-4545 


Paul Patrick 


Earl Redwine 


D. 38 Augusta 


Augusta 


756-4282 


Alice Kate Field 


Larry Stephenson 


Bracl^en County 


Brooksville 


735-3891 


Jarvis Parsley 


Jarvis Parsley 


Deming 


Mt. Olivet 


724-2700 


H. 0. Hale 


Billy Anderson 


Falmouth 


Fabnouth 


654-3316 


Opp Bussell, Jr. 


Herbert Childers 


Pendleton 


Faknouth 


654-3355 


Terry Cummins 


Phillip Wood 


D. 39 Flenung Co. 


Flemingsburg 


845-6601 


Martin Marlar 


Joe Simons 


Lewis County 


Vanceburg 


796-5441 


Teddy Appplegate 


Donnie Gaunce 


Mason County 


R. 1, Maysville 


564-6409 


Elza Whalen, Jr. 


Jim Mitchell 


Maysville 


Maysville 


564-3856 


Oi-ville B. Hayes 


Wood row Telle 


St. Patrick 


Maysville 


564-5329 


Sr. Mary Jude 


Bin Foreman 


Tollesboro 


Tollesboro 


798-2541 


Charles M. Hughes 


Alan Bane 


D. 40 George Rogers Clark 


Winchester 


744-6111 


Letcher W. Norton 


Tommy Harper 


Montgomery County 


Mt. Sterling 


498-2250 


Calvin Hunt 


J. R. Cunningham 


Mt. Sterling 


Mt. Sterling 


498-3484 


James McAfee 


Donald Lane 


St. Agatha Acad. 


Winchester 


744-6484 


Sr. Elizabeth Marie 


James Fanning 






REGION 11 




D. 41 Frankfort 


Frankfort 


223-8030 


Lee T. Mills 


Jack Black 


Franklin County 


Frankfort 


227-2236 


John Underwood 


John Lykins 


Good Shepherd 


Frankiort 


227-9232 


Sr. Maureen 


Charles Furr 


Woodford County 


Versailles 


873-5434 


Charles 0. Dawson 


Edward Allin 


D. 42 Anderson 


Lawrenceburg 


839-3431 


Henry Frazier 


Jack Upchurch 


Burgin 


Burgin 


748-5170 


L. B. OUver 


David Feeback 


Harrodsburg 


Harrodsburg 


734-3242 


Bobby L. Ohaney 


Jerry Gray 


Jessamine County 


R. 3, NicholasviUe 8854849 


Billy Lockridge 


BiUy Case 


Mercer 


Harrodsburg 


7344195 


Cardin Carmack 


Tilden Deskins 


Western 


R. 1, Sinai 


839-3608 


Robert B. Turner 


WUey Brown 


D. 43 Bryan Station 


Lexington 


2994027 


R. L. Grider 


Charles Shipley 


Dunbar 


Lexington 


252-0270 


Mrs. Qara W. Stitt 


Louis Stout 


Henry Clay 


Lexington 


255-5581 


ayde T. Lassiter 


Al Prewitt 


Lafayette 


Lexington 


277-5430 


J. L. Smith 


Herkie Rupp 


Lexington Catholic 


Lexington 


2774775 


Rev. Leo G. Kampsen 


Harry T. Starnes 


Sayre 


Lexington 


254-1361 


Donn HoUingsworth 


Gerald Walton 


Tates Creek 


Lexington 


266-0115 


A. C. Thomas 


Richard Jones 


D. 44 Berea 


Berea 


986-3521 


Phillip Cox 


Charles Eckler 


Estill County 


Irvine 


723-3537 


Luther Patrick 


James Kiser 


Foundation 


Berea 


9864911 


Roy N. Walters 


Lester B. Abbott 


Irvine 


Irvine 


723-3616 


Joe Ohr 


Joe Ohr 


Madison 


Richmond 


6234959 


Patrick E. Napier 


Ray Vencill 


Madison Central 


Richmond 


623-1530 


James B. Moore 


Don Richardson 


Model 


Richmond 


623-7451 


Walter Marcum 


Shirley Kearns 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR JANUARY, 1967 



Page Seven 



I 



School 


Address 


Tel. No. 


Principal 


Coach 






REGION 12 




D. « Boyle County 


Danville 


236-5047 


Roy R. Camic 


Dickie Parsons 


Crab Orchard 


Crab Orchard 


355-2541 


James Ledford, Jr. 


Gene Middleton 


Danville 


Danville 


236-6373 


Don R. Rawhngs 


David Cottrell 


Garrard County 


Lancaster 


792-2147 


Johnnie Ray Laswell 


Dale Moore 


Hustonville 


Hustonville 


346-3831 


Cecil Purdom 


Albert WaU 


Ky. School for the Deaf Danville 


236-5132 


Robert T. Baughman 


James Morrison 


McKinney 


McKinney 


346-2101 


M. C. Montgomery 


Mike Chandler 


Memorial 


Waynesburg 


365-7018 


Lester M. MuUins 


Jim Reynolds 


Stanford 


Stanford 


365-2191 


Norman McGuffey 


Doug Pendygraft 


D. 46 Casey County 


R. 4, Liberty 


787-6151 


Nathaniel Buis 


Danny Trent 


Liberty 


Liberty 


787-6961 


Stanley E. Bryant 


Bob Payne 


Monticello 


Monticello 


3484681 


Eldon E. Davidson 


Joe W. Harper 


Russell County 


Russell Springs 


866-2545 


Vertis Tarter 


Allen Feldhaus 


Wayne County 


Monticello 


348-3311 


Arthur J. Lloyd 


Gerald Sinclair 


D. 47 Burnside 


Burnside 


561-4250 


Collas Simpson 


Oscar Fitzgerald 


Eubank 


Eubank 


3794661 


Harold Carter 


Denton Ping 


Ferguson 


Ferguson 


678-5229 


Bob Overby 


Dan W. Ornlor 


McCreary County 


Whitley City 


376-2213 


W. Norris Manning 


Landon Sexton 


Nancy 


Nancy 


6784942 


Dewey Huff 


Garvis Burkett 


Pine Knot 


Pine Knot 


354-2511 


Carlos F. Lester 


T. E. Daugherty, Jr. 


Pulaski County 


Somerset 


6794721 


Garva G. Wilson 


Bill Mauney 


Shopville 


ShopviUe 


274-3181 


Hobert R. Thompson 


Hulen Wilson 


Somerset 


Somerset 


6784721 


W. B. Jones 


John Loyd 


D. 48 Bush 


Lida 


864-2331 


C. Frank Bentley 


Joe T. Gregory 


Hazel Green 


East Bernstadt 


843-2135 


Qark E. Chesnut 


Raymond Reed 


Lily 


Lily 


8644330 


Harold Storm 


Harvey Mize 


London 


London 


864-2181 


Leighton Watfcins 


Roy Bowling 






REGION 13 




D. 49 AnnviUe 


AnnviUe 


364-3320 


Jason Kuipers 


Jerry Hacker 


Brodhead 


Brodhead 


758-3385 


D. A. Robbins 


Billy Riddle 


Clay County 


Manchester 


598-3737 


Robert Campbell 


Henry J. Garrison 


Jackson County 


McKee 


287-2631 


David B. Gover 


Robert Morris 


Livingston 


Livingston 


453-2121 


Charles B. Parsons 


Preston Parrett 


Mt. Vernon 


Mt. Vernon 


256-2953 


Cleston Baylor 


Jack L. Laswell 


Oneida Inst. 


Oneida 


847-2202 


David C. Jackson 


Winston Kilgore 


D. 50 Barbourville 


Barbourville 


6-3129 


Charles Singleton 


H. D. Tye 


Corbin 


Corbin 


528-3902 


Louie Martin 


Bill Smith 


Knox Central 


Barbourville 


5464136 


Clinton B. Hammons 


Donald Bingham 


Lynn Camp 


Corbin 


528-5429 


P. M. Broughton 


Charles G. Dixon 


Whitley County 


Williamsburg 


6915 


Warren Peace 


Paul Rice 


Williamsburg 


Williamsburg 


6500 


James L. Davis. Jr. 


Al^n LeForce 


D. 51 Bell County 


PinevOle 


337-2329 


James A. PursifuU 


Willie Hendrickson 


Henderson Settlement 


Frakes 


337-3618 


Herby J. Roark 


Wayland Jones 


Lone Jack 


Four Mile 


337-2435 


Chester L. dick 


Shirley Goodin 


Middlesboro 


Middlesboro 


248-1000 


James B. Edwards 


Willie Hendrickson 


Pineville 


PineviUe 


337-2439 


Kffie Arnett 


Tom Stapleton 


Red Bird 


Beverly 


337-3300 


W. L. Knuckles, Jr. 


Jim Malcolm 


D. 52 Cumberland 


Cumberland 


5894625 


Ross Barger 


Freddie Parsons 


Evarts 


Evarts 


837-2502 


O. G. Roaden 


Charles Hunger 


Harlan 


HarlEui 


573-5027 


John Brock 


George Francis 


James A. Cawood 


Harlan 


573-1950 


Claude R. Dozier 


Jim Howard 


Lynch 


Lynch 


848-5486 


Richard A. Smithson 


Edward Miracle 






REGION 14 




D. 53 Fleming Neon 


Fleming 


855-7597 


Roy T. Reasor 


Ralph Roberts 


Jenkins 


Jenkins 


832-2184 


Henry E. Wright 


Don Burton 


Kingdom Come 


Linefork 




I. L. Frazier 


Harold Cornett 


Letcher 


Letcher 


633-2524 


D. C. Taylor 


William D. Bacfk 


Whitesburg 


Whitesburg 


633-2339 


J. M. Burkich 


U. G. Horn 


D. 54 Buckhom 


Buckhom 


398-7176 


Fred W. Johnson 


Winfred Smith 


Combs Memorial 


Jeff 


436-2500 


Homer Jones 


Harvey Combs 


Hazard 


Hazard 


436-3711 


John C. Stringer 


Roscoe Shackelford 


Leatherwood 


Leatherwood 


675-4431 


Ronald V. Woods 


Lloyd Smith, Jr. 


Leslie County 


Hyden 


672-2337 


P. P. Estridge 


R. B. Singleton 


M. C. Napier 


Hazard 


fr4541 


Paul H. ColweU 


Albert Combs 



Page Hght 




THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHI.ETE FOR JANUARY, 1967 


School 


Address 


Tel. No. 


Principal 


Coach 


3. 55 BreatWtt 


Jackson 


666-2805 


Millard ToUiver 


Fairce 0. Woods 


Can- Creek 


Can Creek 


642-3580 


Morton Combs 


Morton Combs 


Oordia 


Hazard 


251-2207 


Alice H. Slone 


George W. Comett 


Ilindman 


Hindman 


785-5361 


Vesper Singleton 


Pearl Combs 


Jackson 


Jackson 


666-5164 


James B. Goff 


James B. Goff 


Knott County 


Pippa Passes 


785-5783 


Edward Madden 


James Moore 


Oakdale Christian 


R. 1, Jackson 


666-5422 


WiUard Trepus 


Norman Engell 


tv'verside Christian 


Lost Creek 


666-2359 


Dr. Harold E. Rarnett 


Doran Hostetler 


0. H Hazel Green Acad. 


Hazel Green 


6624475 


George W. Buchanan 


J. W. Ballard 


Lee County 


Bcattyville 


464-8126 


Gordon Cook 


Heber Dunaway 


Owsley Co. 


Booneville 


593-2815 


W. 0. Gabbard 


J. D. Seale 


Powell County 


Stanton 


6634475 


Russell Bowen, Jr. 


James Davis 


Wolfe County 


Campion 


668-3845 


Bill C. Hurt 


Granville Deaton, Jr. 






REGION 15 




D. 57 Blaine 


Blaine 


652-3624 


Max E. Calhoun 


Joe P. BlankensMp 


Flat Gap 


B\at Gap 


265-2164 


W. H. Conley 


Jesse Salyers 


Inez 


Inez 


298-3264 


Russell Williamson 


Billy Ray Cassady 


Louisa 


Loaisa 


638-4574 


J. I. Cheek 


William E. Haines 


Meade Memory J 


Williamsport 


789-5050 


Harold L. Preston 


Howard W. Wallen 


Oil Springs 


0.1 Springs 


297-3674 


Virgil Porter 


Paul Williams 


Paintsville 


Paintsville 


789-3881 


Paul W. Trimble 


Gary Knight 


Salyersvil'it 


SalyersvUle 


349-5761 


Garland Arnett 


Robert L. Slone 


Van Le-'ii 


Van Lear 


7694932 


Hysell Burchett 


Howard Ramey 


WarfieJf' 


'v\arfield 


395-5341 


Russell H. Stepp 


John Williams 


0. n Betsv Layne 


Betsy Layne 


478-2255 


D. W. Howard 


Thomas Boyd 


Garrett 


Garrett 


358-3461 


Burnice Gearheart 


John Campbell, Jr. 


M( -Dowel] 


McDowell 


377-6202 


Lloyd Stumbo 


Pete Grigsby Jr. 


Miutin 


Martin 


285-3011 


Philip Dingus 


Denzil Halbert 


Maytov"! 


Langley 


285-3346 


Edwin V. Stewart 


Gene Erasure 


Prestoosburg 


Prestonsburg 


886-2252 


Woodrow AUen 


Jack F. Wells 


Wa viand 


Wayland 


358-3911 


James V. Bolen 


James David Hensley 


Wheelwright 


Wheelwright 


2110 


Boone Hall 


Franklin Francis 


D. 59 Lwrton 


Dorton 


2832 


Charles Wright 


Fleetwood Johnson 


Hellier 


Hellier 


754-8184 


Paul L. Owens 


Robert L. Walters 


Mullins 


R. 1, Pikeville 


432-2733 


Phenis Potter 


Bun Jack Bumette 


Pikeville 


Pikeville 


437-6870 


Berry Thacker 


John Lee Butcher 


Virgie 


Virgie 


639-2774 


Fred W. Cox 


Arnold Meek 


D. 60 Belfry 


Belfiy 


353-7362 


W. F. Doane 


Jim Hutchens 


Elkhom City 


Elkhom aty 


754-7981 


James V. Powell 


Billy R. Powell 


Feds Creek 


Feds Creek 


835-2286 


Nelson Hamilton 


Ronald Francisco 


Johns Creek 


R. 1, Pikeville 


437-6361 


James T. Dotson 


Aubrey Taylor 


Phelps 


Phelps 


456-9310 


J. H. Cromer 


James E. Carter 






REGION 16 




D. 61 Bath County 


Owingsville 


674-2501 


L. C. Smith 


Ewell Smoot, Jr. 


Ezei 


Ezel 


7254545 


Conrad Rowland 


Henry E. Cochran 


Menifee County 


Frenchburg 


768-2373 


Hiram C. Walters 


Joe Paul Blankendiip 


Morgan County 


West Liberty 


743-3705 


Thomas W. Wilson 


Charles E. Cain 


Rowan County 


Morehead 


7844153 


Russell Boyd 


Warren Cooper 


Univ. Breckinridge 


Morehead 


7844181 


Reedus Back 


Dienzel Dennis 


D. 62 Carter 


Carter 


474-6151 


William N. Collins 


Cy Richardson, Jr. 


Hitchins 


Hitchins 


474-5784 


Leonard Marshall 


Roy F. Murphy 


Olive HiU 


Olive Hill 


286-2481 


Glenn M. Sparks 


Jack Fultz 


PrichEird 


Grayson 


474-5421 


H. R. Bowling 


Dick Vincent 


Sandy Hook 


Sandy Hook 


738-5225 


John H. Vansant 


Jesse J. Adkins 


D. 63 Greenup 


Greenup 


473-3781 


Mrs. Ethel McBrayer 


Ramey Fletcher 


McKeH 


South Shore 


932-3323 


Charles E. Mullins 


Robert Crotty 


Raceland 


Raceland 


836-8221 


James E. Conley 


Bert Green 


Russell 


Russell 


836-3531 


Frank V. Firestine 


Marvin Meredith 


Wurtland 


Wurtland 


836-5931 


Charles Banks 


Larry Jordan 


D. 64 Boyd County 


R. 2, Ashland 


9394428 


Doug Cole 


Mike Jupin 


Catlettsburg 


Catlettsburg 


739-4663 


WUliam Holbrook 


Jack Ison 


Fairview 


Ashland 


324-9226 


Webb Young 


George Cooke 


Holy Family 


Ashland 


324-7040 


Sr. Caroline Maiy 


William Carroll 


Paul G. Blazer 


Ashland 


3254706 


Clyde Hunsaker 


Harold Cole 



THE KENTUCKY fflGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR JANUARY, 1967 



Page Nine 



RUSSELLVILLE — CLASS A FINALIST 




(Left to Right) Front Row: Gregg Arnold, Mike Bnrchett, Jim Welker, Toby Nichols. Larry Bell, Fred 
Atkinson, Tom Bonasso. Gary Todd, Rickie Stack. John Pulley, Alan Neal. Donnie Baggett. Second Row; 
Jim Drake, Charles Page, Larry Duffey, Gary Nnyt, Henry Noe, John Mallory, Mitchell Campbell. Mike 
Williamson. Chris Watson, Francis Marren, Johnny Neill, Mike Threlkeld, Paul Ditzer. Third Row: Sieve 
Tattitch, James Kees. Dennis Nnyt, Billy Warden, Eddie Mallory, Danny Belcher, Randy Cowan, John 
Richards. Tom Threlkeld, Larry Clark, Randy Arnold. Mike Gilliam, Joe Strange, BUly Costello, Ronnie 
Bell. Fourth Row: Tommy Kemp, Coach Clarence Baker, Ass't Coach Maarice Linton, AasH Coach Elmer 
Murray, Dickie Switzer. 

CAMPBELLSVILLE — CLASS A. RESIGN I, DISTRICT 2, CHAMPION 




(Left to Right) Front Row: Johnny Allen, Terry Tucker. Dong Canlk. Bill Wade. Brace Carter, Jan 
Netherland, Forest Wise, Ray Netherland. John Perkins, Phil Blevina. Terry Farmer. Larry Phillips, Guy 
Smith. Dale Wolford. George Smith. Second Row : David Meyers, Bill Shely, Ronnie PenH-i-ton Randy 
Keltner, Bobby Phillips, Darrell Dooley, Bradley Clark, John Wagster, Ernie Gabehart ' . Wright. Gar- 
net Montgomery, Bob Backner, Bobby Farmer, Third Row : Ass'l (^ach Ken* .1 - < " hi,ir.s, Ass't Coach 
Walter McHargue. Mark Rippy, Terry Wilkins, Dee Wade, Greg Stiles, Bill Wrigiit ^arry Whitley. David 
Harding, James Dix, Anthony Holland, Richard Jeter, Coach Vincent Hancock, .'figr. Richard Sandefar. 



I 



PINEVILLE — CLASS A, REGION 4. CHAMPION 




(Left to Right) Front Row: James Croley, Ray Sams, Benny Adams, Ricky Washington, Steve Akere, 
Lncian Hodges, Don Walters. Kenneth Rosenbalm, Russell Howard, Gary Howard, Morris Lefevers. Second 
Row: Mgr. Gary Warren, Rnssell Broolis. Bill Stewart, Mike Downey, James Harrison, Edward Davis, 
Danny Jones, Tim Stephens, Mike Mills. Sidney Allen, Milton Lewis, Darrell Johnson, Mgr. Jimmie Col- 
lett. Third Rr>w: Coach Bill Adams, Don Bnchanon, Bruce Hendrickson, David Baker, Ralph Rossell, Len 
Suiter, Clayton Woods, Lyle Bailey, John Lefevers, Hogh Cnlton, David Asher, Foley Rego, Coach Tom 
Stapleton. 



Page Ten 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR JANUARY, 1967 



The Flying Dutchman 

The next time you are in Louisville's 
Brown Hotel, drop in The Louisville Apothe- 
cary and say "Hello" to a kindly, silver- 
haired gentleman whom you'll find working 
at a small desk right alongside the prescrip- 
tion counter. Tell him that the Dutchman 
sent you. Only on rare occasions does any- 
one know when he is in the presence of one 
of "Nature's Noblemen," but that's what 
will happen when you shake the hand of 
Fred Kluth. This is the best method the 
Dutchman can recommend for a good start 
on this new year. Mr. Fred is a legend in 
his own time. Here's his story: 

Right after the turn of the century Fred 
Kluth, who is now pushing seventy-five, 
and a couple of his buddies decided to open 
a drugstore on Louisville's Fourth Street. 
Between the three of them they scraped 
together five hundred dollars and went into 
business. Mr. Fred parlayed this humble 
drug business into a chain of Louisville 
Apothecaries dotted all over Louisville. My 
old friend. Art Nieman, now operates the 
chains and Mr. Kluth devotes about a hun- 
dred per cent of his time toward bringing 
happiness into the lives of others. 

Every kid in this Metrooolitan Area and 
hundreds of youngsters yet to be bom owe 
this gentleman a debt. As a member of Jef- 
ferson County's Park and Recreation Board 
he constantly gives his time and money to 
the job of building new parks and play- 
grounds as well as looking for more poten- 
tial park ground. 

A musical group called the Chordians 
needed a thousand dollars for a trin — so 
whom did these kids call on? — Fred Kluth 
— and Mr. Fred sold enough calendars carry- 
ing advertising to send the youngsters mer- 
rily on their way. A few days before Christ- 
mas he was selling fruit cakes for a service 
club and one day last summer he was oper- 
ating a peanut stand for the good of an- 
other public project. 

Fred Kluth is making three trips start- 
ing now. First he is going to Mexico, then 
to Florida, and finally to Spain, but he will 
come back between each trip to Louisville so 
that he doesn't miss any meetings of his 
beloved Jefferson County Parks and Recrea- 
tion Board. You'd just better believe that 
he's a legend ! Remember to drop in on him 
just to have the privilege of shaking his 
hand. It has been almost three years since a 
Kentuckian has qualified for the Nature's 
Nobleman award, so the Dutchman's first 
recoemition of 1967 is the Nobleman's plaque 
to Fred Kluth. 




Fred Kluth 

The second Flying Dutchman award in 
this New Year of 1967 is a recognition of 
another one of Kentucky's game guys. Eliz- 
abethtown's Howie Gardner is interested in 
Dave Harmond. "E'Town High School has 
every reason to be proud of Dave," writes 
Howie. This lad had the potential of a great 
athlete, but damaged his spleen in his soph- 
omore year. When mononucleosis developed, 
everybody thought Dave was finished ex- 
cept the lionhearted lad himself. The young 
fighter came back to play football again and 
became an outstanding baseball player. Al- 
though Dave missed many classes he main- 
tained a B average and is now editor of the 
school paper. A lionheart award has been 
sent Dave Harmond and he is now eligible 
for consideration for the Game Guy Citation 
of 1967. 

All of you Kentuckians who have learned 
to love and help boys and eirls and the 
sports they play are lucky — ^There's no way 
for you to grow old. Walt Disney looked 
twenty years younger than his sixty-five. 
There's Orville Schmied of St. Matthews 
and Fern Creek's Ennis Johnson, both push- 
ing fifty and looking thirty, while Nelson 
Hornbeck, whom Fairdale proudlv claims as 
a favorite son, is now seventy-five and is 
still building playgrounds, golf courses, 
lakes and bowling greens for his beloved 
children — and he has thousands. 

Another remarkable "Kentucky young- 
ster" is that lovable mountaineer, Russ Wil- 
liamson of Inez. His "go-go" has never got 
up and went, and this "kid" has got to be 
near sixty. For your information the Dutch- 
man just checked up and was surprised that 
he 'had racked up fifty-eight winters him- 
self and, in spite of this, is still picking up 
momentum. Boys and girls do this for you, 
provided you do something for them. Ex- 
pand your efforts for the sports program of 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR JANUARY, 1967 



Page Eleven 



the K.H.S.A.A. and you are headed in the 
right direction. 

Fern Creek's Don Metzger and his Jeffer- 
son County Officials Association want to 
know how many seconds must be consumed 
before a technical foul is called in a no- 
action "Farce" basketball game. Here's the 
way it goes, fellows : The covering official 
estimates 25 seconds of no activity and then 
with a chopping motion of his hands tolls 
off 5 more seconds. He then motions in the 
direction the play should go and calls out, 
"Play ball." After this warning he allows 5 
more seconds for the responsible team to 
supply proper activity. Finally, he calls a 
technical foul if the responsible team has 
failed to comply. 

So it's a new year again and here comes 
some more Dutch philosophy: Don't worry 
about yesterday. Those mistakes are "water 
over the dam" — Don't worry about tomor- 
row because that belongs to God and your 
brooding might be wasted because you 
might not even be around. Today is all you 
have, so get with it. 

Happy New Year! 



FROM THE COMMISSIONER'S OFFICE 



(Continued 

Nash, Dennis B. 
Norwood, Thomas R. 
Pack, James W. 
Purcell, Billy D. 
Radjunas, Edward 
Rees, Gayle H. 
Salyer, Henry E. 
Sharp, Lloyd 
Shuck, Thomas G. 
Sims, Frank D. 
Singleton, Bobby L. 



from Page Two) 

Stoess, Henry L. 
Thomas, Billy G. 
Triplett, Herbert W. 
VanZant, Jim 
Vescovi, Raymond B. 
Waller, Bob 
Weiner, Dick 
Wirtz, Howard 
WoprJce, Ron 
York, Jim 



Correction 

In the list of Swimming events, appearing on page 
51 in the 1966-67 K.H.S.A.A. booklet, appears the 200 
Yard Freestyle Relay. The event should have been 
listed as the 400 Yard Freestyle Relay. 



Coaching For A Lasting Victory 

Democracy is both a pohtical and social philosophy. 
It is based on the Judaic-Christian ethic that the indi- 
vidual soul is sacred and therefore of supreme impor- 
tance. Lying at the heart of our American values are 
the fundamental beliefs in the dignity and integrity of 
human personalities, in the inherent worth of the 
individual and in the sacredness of human life. An 
lAmerican boy or girl has a right to the freedom of 
being an individual. 

Dean Stephen K. Bailey, speaking before the Na- 
tional Association of Secondary School Principals in 
January, 1965, said: "If we in education do nothing 
but hone the mind and extend the range and utility 
of human knowledge and wisdom, we will have missed 



our most compelUng function. The ultimate responsi- 
bility of education is to affirm and to restore man's 
sense of his own nobility. The insistent message of the 
prophetic geniuses of history is that there is a quali- 
tative difference between man and beast, that man 
has the capacity to enter into a special relationship 
is a man's glory and meaning." 

Each boy or girl needs to know much about them- 
selves, their origin, their dual nature (animal and 
spiritual), their weaknesses, their strengths and the 
potential of their bodies, minds and spirits for these 
are the tools with which they will make a life. 

iVIany thousands of years ago, at a certain period 
in the metamorphosis of the being who was to become 
man, the Creator gave him the ability to ask himself 
the question as to whether a contemplated act was 
"good" or whether another was "better." He acquired 
a liberty that distinguished him from other animals. 
He was endowed with a conscience, a will, and be- 
came man. Henceforth, he had the freedom to make 
choices, to criticize and control his desires, which 
were previously the only law. The Bible records that 
God "breathed into his nostrils the breath of life; and 
man became a living soul." To man's animal nature 
was added the spiritual and moral nature. Man, there- 
after, had the choice either of obeying the orders of 
the flesh, of regressing, or by his will struggling 
against these animal instincts and affirming the dig- 
nity of his spirit and his manhood. 

As a high school or Junior high coach, you are in 
a position of greater influence than possibly any other 
member of the faculty. Every word, mannerism, habit 
and decision is evaluated and, in many cases, imitated 
by the students. Do you point the training and devel- 
opment program only for the sport season, the school 
year, or the student's period of eligibiUty, rather than 
as a foundation development for an active and healthy 
way of life? 

Our sports are highly competitive and often bodily 
contact is involved. The matching of the body skills, 
strength and stamina under pressure, tend to magnify 
the animal characteristics and instincts, but neverthe- 
less, set the stage for the participant to exhibit his 
manhood or her womanhood, to demonstrate the de- 
gree of self-mastery necessary to subdue these in- 
stincts and enthrone the dignity of his or her own 
ethical, moral and spiritual personality. The coach 
who neglects the development of these moral and spir- 
itual ethics may develop a skillful player who is also 
a bully, a liar, a cheat and a thief. Capabilities, self- 
confidence and assurance attained in sports must be 
enlarged into responsibilities, self-esteem, honor and 
integrity of personality. 

The next step in the development of an individual 
capable of assuming the full responsibilities for his 
acts is acceptance of the fact that each member of his 
team, his coach and his opponents are all individual 
personalities of potential equal qualities with those of 
his own, with unquestioned equal rights, and that the 
dignity of their individuality and the reverence of their 
personality are to be respected. Albert Schweitzer 
has said: "As soon as a man begins to reflect upon 
himself and his relationships to others, he becomes 
aware that men, as such, are equal and his neigh- 
bors." 

This self-esteem that begets honor and these atti- 
tudes towards others and the behaviors which they 
motivate which distinguish man from beast, are not 
inherited. They must be taught to individuals "for 
learning takes place one learner at a time." Each 
success is a lasting victory. 

—Oklahoma S.S.A. Bulletin 



Page Twelve 



THE KENTUCKY fflGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR JANUARY. 196 



Why Not Soccer? 

By Mohammed Sabie, Ed.D. 
Associate Professor, Morehead State U. 

Soccer is generally acclaimed to be the world's most 
popular sport. One of the essential sports of the game 
is that an individual can be in active play starting at 
the fourth grade up on into the college level. Weight 
and height are no problem to the agile, good soccer 
player. Body co-odmation is developed through vigor- 
ous participation on the part of each olayer in the on- 
going movement throughout the game of running, kick- 
ing, heading the ball, throwing, passing, tackling, and 
packing. Idleness on the part of any player is least 
likely to be appreciated by members of his team. 

Though there is enough contact in the game of soccer 
to satisfy the need for good competition among team- 
mates, there is a minimum of hazard to the players' 
life on the risk of his physical or mental wellbeing. 

Dr. Harry A. Roselle, member of the staff of St. 
Luke Hospital at New York, in an article, "Football 
Danger? Soccer Urged As Safer," says, "I think that 
one of our problems relative to physical fitness is that 
most of our sports actually do not require participants 
to be in top condition." He adds, "For example, I used 
to play baseball a great deal in my student days, as 
an outfielder. I would spend hours just standing about, 
rarely stretching a muscle or straining myself to catch 
a ball." 

Today soccer is gaining in popularity. Increasingly, 
junior colleges, colleges and universities are playing 
soccer. In Kentucky five higher education institutions 
have formed soccer teams: Berea College, Kentucky 
Southern College, University of Kentucky, University 
of Louisville and Morehead State University. This year, 
1966, Morehead State University played in the state of 
Tennessee against the University of Chattanooga and 
Vanderbilt University; in the state of Georgia against 
Emory University; and in the state of West Virginia 
against Marshall University and Morris Harvey Col- 
lege. 

To start a soccer program in a school places no 
burdens on the budget since the game is financially 
economical , and requires little equipment. It gives 
students a chance to air their hostilities as well as 
train their sense of responsibility, courage, self-confi- 
dence, stamina, discipline, and a chance to use basic 
human skills in some organized situation. Once the 
program is started appreciation is bound to follow and 
soon enthusiasm and participation becomes very ap- 
parent. 

INDIVIDUAL TACTICS 

Goalkeeper: 

1. A good goalkeeper never uses his feet when he 
can use his hands. 

2. Don't leave your goal unless it is very important 
to do so. 

3. A goalkeeper must catch the ball with both hands 
and always keep it close to his chest. 

4. A goalkeeper has to watch all players on the 
field and keep his eyes mostly on the baU at all times. 

5. The goalkeeper should be able to judge which of 
the players is going to do the shooting at the goal. 

6. A good goalkeeper never makes the same mis- 
take twice in a game situation. 

7. A good goalkeeper never gets upset easily during 
the game. 

8. A good goalkeeper should know when and where 
to throw the ball or kick it to a teammate. 

9. A good goalkeeper should be alert. Good decision 
before going to the ball is essential. 

Fullbacks: 

1. A good fullback should place himself in a correct 




v^v^e 



UHS 










;-AJ 






Rn>/ 







UE-f T f oU-^fccK 



ifeHT Fu\.\.%ftt< 



position on the field to prevent the attacker from g< 
ting the ball through. 

2. A fuUback has to follow his opponent closely mo 
of the time and play him man to man defense. 

3. A fullback has to force his ooponent to the sid 
line of the fiek' raiher than letting him go into tl 
middle of the field. 

4. In a dangerous situation he must quickly kick tl 
ball away from his goal's area. 

5. He must be able to tackle the attacker with eith 
leg in order to save the ball. 

6. He must be capable of hard heading the ball to 
teammate. 

7. When the attacker has the ball, the fullbai 
should wait and watch carefully until the attacker tak 
his first move with the ball, then the fuUback mu 
move in the ball's way. 

8. Head the ball at the highest point of your jum 

9. You should learn how to cover a definite zone in 
given situation. 

10. You should never dribble the ball into play 
zones, but kick quickly and accurately to a teammal 

11. Give as much assistance to your halfback as y< 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR JANUARY, 1967 



Page Thirteen 



PAUL G. BLAZER — CLASS AA, REGION 3, DISTRICT 2. CHAMPION 

53j 







30 ' 70^7; 



.«%.10.a22^3V31^f 8^3^17 1|^7$^^ 3j 




I .,!-.- 



(Left to Right) Front Row; Mgr. Tom Bumette, Mgr. Danny Dove, James Sievert, Smoke Ingram. Mike 
Johnson, Jim Gallaway, Larry Stambaugh, Bill Bailey, Edward Church, Jim Rayburn. Tony Mulvaney. 
Mgr. Keith Mills, Mgr. Terry McMeans. Second Row : Coach Zeke Myers, Tom Sloan, Jim Skaggs, Bob 
Eckhart, Don Lentz, Toby Tolbert, Jerry Reams, David Wolfe, Roger Frazier, Mike Tackett, Paul Hill. 
John Radjunas, Larry Johnson, Neil Frost, Coach Cagle Curtis. Third Row : Coach Herb Conley, Steve 
Hemlepp, Mike John, John Sargent, Danny Ingart, Steve Gerrard, John Moore, Bob Ison, Gary Bays. Terry 
Spears, Guy Gibbons. Les Lyons, Jim Lyons, Ed Meadors, Jack Dempsey, Coach Jake Hallum. Fourth Row: 
Joe Franklin, John Benton, Bill Cunningham, Doug Stanley, Robby Spence, Robby Keeton, Bill Culbertson. 
Steve Scott, Tom Lyons, Doug Freeman. Roger Williams Mgr. Condit Steil, Bob Tilton. Fifth Row: Jeff 
Daniels, Bill Gannon, Bob Salyer, Larry Webb, Bill Brown, Brower Moffitt, Wayne Workman, Larry 
Sparks, Ellis Childers, Rick Fannin, Russell Jones, Ellis Gilliam. 



possibly can. 

12. You should know that your main duty is the 
ball, which means not only the securing of the ball, 
but also placing it in the right position. 

13. You should make good judgment in tackling so 
£LS to get the ball; without getting the ball you will be 
helpless. 

Halfbacks: 

1. A good halfback usually covers more ground in 
a game situation than other players. 

2. His main job in the game is to act or transmit 
the ball between the fullbacks and the forwards. 

3. He should be capable of choosing when to be 
close to his opponent or when to fend away from him 
in order to intercept the ball and start attacking. 

4. He can play or attack only when he is sure that 
one of his teammates has replaced his defensive posi- 
tion. 

5. He should know that he is the backbone of the 
team, because on the defensive side he must be able 
to tackle just as strongly and accurately as a good 
fullback. On the offensive side he must be able to drib- 
ble, pass, shoot and handle the ball just as effectively 
as a good forward. 

6. He should be able to do the freekicks and the 
indirect sideline kicks. 

7. Always place yourself in offside situations when 
you are playing near the opponent's area. 

8. Watch your opponent consistently throughout the 
game. 

Forwards: 

1. A forward's main duty is to put the ball in the 
opponent's goal. 

2. A good forward should be able to use both feet in 
passing, dribbling, and accurate kicking to different 
angles on the field. 

3. He should know how to head the ball to the differ- 
ent cuigles of the goal. 

4. He should be able to judge distance and pass the 
ball with enough force. 

5. When a forward is in the penalty zone with the 
ball his best cheince is to shoot at the goal. When he is 
outside the penalty zone he may stop the ball, dribble 
it or pass it on to a teammate. 

6. He should find an open place for him on the field 
to make it easier for a teammate to head him with the 



ball. 

7. He should stop short passes and not try to raise 
the ball high. 

8. He should be very active and never depend com- 
pletely on the halfback to feed him with the bail at all 
times. 

9. He must prevent himself from being in an offside 
situation. 



SUPPLEMENTARY LIST OF 
REGISTERED BASKETBALL OFFICIALS 

(List Compiled December 23) 

If one telphone number is given for an official listed, it is 
the home phone unless otherwise designated. If two numbers 
are given, the first number is that of the home phone. 

,\rnold. Bill W.. 3915 Tracy Ave.. Covington. 581-7420, 431-6990 
Ausmus, William H., 105 Edgewood Rd., Middlesboro. 248-2176 
Bailey, Benny Ray. Wheelwright High School. Wheelwright 
Bailey, Preston. Route 1. Bonnieville, 765-2630 (Bus.) 
Bales, Don B.. 705 Link Ave., Paris 987-2327. North Middle- 
town 362-4523 
Beck, Robert Earl. 7530 Merlyn Circle, Louisville. 368-1965 
Beck. Ronald D.. 1504 Chestnut St.. Bowling Green. 842-6722 
Bienick. Stanley A.. 11702 Harden Court, Cincinnati, Ohio, 

825-5651. 681-2945 
Blackburn. Adrian. 407 Scott Court, Prestonsburg. 886-2401 
Bottom. Lawrence W.. K. A. House, Georgetown. 863-2882 
Bunch. Charles D.. 108 Media Ave.. Bowling Green 
Campbell Lonnie. 678 Fairview Court, Harrodsburg, 734-4962, 

734-3292 
Cantrall. James R., 1810 Hounz Lane, Anchorage, 245-8760, 

.f;«9-5.t;«3 
Carroll, Ronald D., 1708 Oakhurst, Apt 8, Louisville. JU 

7-8411 District 2 rB„s.) 
Certain. CaWand. 1302 W<i<ihinKton. Sturgis. 333-2828. 333-4008 
Chanev. Bobby L.. 372 College Manor. Box 60, HaiTodsburg, 

734-9877. 734-3242 
Chanev, Rex. 304 West Sun, Morehead 

323 
Clark. Owen B.. 106 Kentucky Ave.. Georgetown 

LexiTieton 252-8717 
Cloud Ralph L.. Bailey Hill. Box 535 

B''60 
Coffman. C. Morris. P. O. Box 200. 

821-5150 
Collins. Wonald. 2.=i90 Old Buttermilk, 

341-0578 431-9962 
Dyke Orville Dean. Box 231. Crestwood. 241-4109, 

pxt. '574 
VHelen Bpn .Tr.. 3203 Klondike Lnne. Lo"isvi1Te 
Ferqriison Thomas L.. 407 Cahell Court, Hun+inerton 
Fisho- Michael Tlomri^s '35 West Hall. W.K.U.. 

r-.-pen 745-4564 745-4564 
■irlpt,.her Cnrfis Chattflvnv W. Va. 

i^nllev. Di"k. Route 2 Ml-- <5tpvHn(r 498-5318. 408-2660 
Garland. Danny A.. 256 McKenzie Drive. Frankfort. 223-8608 



84-7880. 784-4181 cxt. 
863-3719. 
Harlan. 573-5902, 573- 
Madisonville, 821-2600, 
Villa Hills, Covington, 
454-7511 



W. Va. 
Bowling 



Page Fourteen 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR JANUARY, 1967 



BARDSTOWN — CLASS A, REGION 2, DISTRICT I. CHAMPION 




(Left to Right) Front Row: Larry Donald, Frank Cambron, Travis Scott, Ritchie Oakley, Donnie Rogers, 
Alan Kraus, Jimmy Bose, David Shelton, Marshall Garrett. Second Row: Phillip Lindsey, James Mason, 
William Hamilton. Frank Boblitt, Anthony Martin, Bill Trigg, Phil McKay, Buddy Martin. Third Row: 
Boyd Kidwell, John Arnold, Glenn Cammack. Tommy Byrne, Bill Unseld, Alan Bottom, Bob Fulkerson, 
Terry Allen. Fourth Row: Mgr. Arch McKay, Tommy Durham, Greg Florence, Robert Wayne, Bruce Rowe, 
Ricky Barnes, Joe Werner, Billy Gilky, Landon Mathews. 



Gai-n-ood, David, 8451 Pollux Court, Cincinnati, Ohio, 622-7137, 

251-6025 
Gibson, Eddie, Box 96, Pippa Passes, 786-5659 
Giordano, A], 107 Ratliff, Princeton, 365-5680. 366-5615 
Glasscock. William E., Route 2, Cecilia, 862-3853 
Green, Walt, 411 N. 25lh St., Mlddlesboro, 248-4569, 248-1000 
Haney, Phillip, 2808 ilton Ave., Ashland, 326-2437, 326-4706 
Hinsdale, James Keuben, Berea College, Box SU9, Berea 
Holland, David, Beechmont, 476-8248 
Houcnens, Joe Danny, 106 Travis Court, Glasgow 
Hurst, Dale, 22 West Lexington, Wincnester, 744-7716, 744-4915 
Hutchcraft, Winn V., Jr., 164 East Main St., Paris, 987-1911. 

254-0290 
Jenkins, Walter L., Route 1, Box 12C. Ironton, Ohio, 632-9592 
Kemplm, Frank, Georgetown College Box 162, Georgetown, 

863-7291 
Kenneth, Ronald L.. 1037 Cross Keys, Lexington, 278-6791, 

264-3847 
King. P. J., 3776 Thruston-Dermont Rd., Owensboro, 3-3169 
Kiser, Arvle, Jr., 308 Tulane Drive. Lexington, 277-8949, 254- 

6143 
Kitchen, Leslie, 1701 Lindy Lane, Lexington, 255-6062, 299- 

4381 
Knight. Rodney, Route 1. Box 282A, Greenville, 338-3535 
Lambert, Robert, Ohio River Road, Greenup, 473-3766 
Lane, Dorman, Faubush 
Langolf, Alfred Robert, 1750 Chichester Ave.. Louisville, 

464-7876, 687-0501 
Lester, J. L., 467 High St., Danville, 236-3694 (Bus.) 
Lindenberger, John B.. 6001 Morning Glory Lane, Louisville, 

935-3189 
Lloyd, David, 615 Elm St., Ludlow, 581-1119, HI 1-7100 
Louden, Forrest W., Western Ky. Univ., Bowling Green, 

842-9790. Bedford, 255-3538 
McMenama, John H., 1713 Sarasota Court , Lexington, 299- 

1876, 265-7327 
McWhorter, Jim E., Box 72, East Bernstadt, 843-5852 
Marshall, James E., Campbellsville College, Box 154, Camp- 

bellsville. 466-9913 
Mayer, John P., Bo.x 27, Frenchburg 
Maynard, Raymond L., Collins Creek, Box 87, Warfield, 395- 

5222. 298-3501 
Menifee, Charles F., Box 60, Hitchins, 474-5860 
Moore, Jimmie Glenn, Shawneetown, Apt. A-211, Lexington, 

277-9164 
Moore. William G., 1923 Dixon St., Ashland, 325-3683, 325-3683 
Moynihan, Michael John, 1803 Newburg Road, Louisville, 459- 

4779 
Osborn. Philip, 1401 Paul Ave., Louisville 
Osborne. Gary, Box 192, Pikeville. 437-4667 

Otis, Billy, Route 2, Hutcherson Heights. Hodgenville, 368-3615 
Perry, Tom, Route 2, Box 494, Mt. Sterling, 498-3827, 498-3800 
Poe. James R.. Box 10, Benton, 627-9537. 627-9537 
Powers, Elmer, Jarvis, 546-3339 

Pratt. Gregory, Morehead State Univ., Box 651, Morehead 
Rardin, James W., 262 Clay Ave., Lexington 



Rash, Lindell L., Box 278, Mortons Gap, 258-6136, 258-6362 

Redden, Robert B., Flatwoods, 836-3140, 836-3140 

Rich, Barry Joe, Bee Spring, 697-2000, 697-3296 

Ricketts, Claude O., 1506 Larchmont Ave., Louisville, 635-6636, 

634-1651 ext. 220 
Rose. Wally C, 623 Southridge Drive, Lexington, 299-6881 
Rothfuss, Richard, 37 Gregory Lane, Ft. Thomas, 441-9190, 

431-6990 
Rowe, Steve, 4133 Flintlock Drive, No. BIO, Louisville 
Russell, Richard, Route 2, Box 209, Hazard, 251-2916 
Sadler, George A., Wilson Row, Morehead, 784-5473 
Sanford, Dutton, Jr., 6008 Green Manor Drive, Louisville, 

964-0401, 964-6931 
Scott, Jerry L., 600 Flamingo, Frankfort, 223-5065, 255-2840 
Seay, Gai-y, Route 1, Calvert City, 898-3665 
Sellier, Edward F., Jr., 2251 Winterberry Drive, Lexington, 

278-1465, 277-5430 
Sherrow, Harry T., 606 Eden Road, Lexington, 299-8830, 

252-2260 ext. 3257 
Skaggs, Bobby L., Route 3, Box 110, Russell Springs, 866-4342 
Skaggs, Robert L., 515 North Broadway, Leitchfield, 269-3438, 

259-4144 
Sledd, Seldon Dale, 318 Davis Drive, Clarksville, Tenn., 647-8597 
Smith, Barry, Route 2, Sonora, 369-2864, 862-3924 
Smith, Richard R., 3853 Walhampton Drive, Lexington, 277- 

6881, 278-5013 
Stephenson, Harry S., 1612 Hawthorn, Lexington, 299-1757, 

265-2960 ext. 284 
Stewart. Buddy, Main St., Brownsville, 597-2193 
Taylor, George D., Jr., 514 East Cherry, Scottsville, 237-3798 
Taylor, Ricky D.. Route 1, Crittenden, 485-4063, 282-2915 
Tracy. Ronnie G., Route 4 Mt. Sterling 498-0020 498-2550 
Triplett, Michael Douglas, Warfield, 396-6325, 395-5331 
Trout, Justin D., 3616 Valley Drive. Ashland, 324-9600, 324-1155 

ext. 462 
Turner, Bruce, 1456 High St., Paris, 987-2713. 987-9030 
Turner. Tommy, 111 Molly St., Versailles, 873-5666, 227-4985 
Vermillion, C. D.. 1402 Roosevelt, Corbin. 628-2942 
Vickery, Dan D., Union College, Box 236, Barbourville, 546-9913 
Voorhis, Kenneth, 142 Woodmore Ave., Apt. 8, Louisville, 

368-7664. 937-2300 
Walter, William Grady, 55th St., Ashland, 324-7585 
Walters, Darwin. P. O. Box 103. Cawood. 573-5868. 673-1950 
Walton. Roy, 106 Vanderbilt, Lexington, 277-2241 
West, Bob, 1413% College St., Bowling Green, 843-9136 
Wheat. Sonny Bnell. 403 North 6th St., Scottsville, 237-3057 
Wilson, Jim, 5 Girard St., Florence. 282-7862. 282-3666 
Wise. Larry, 1820 Appleton, Apt. 8, Louisville, 366-2946, 

366-4633 
Woofter, William Clintin 11, Hendricks Hall, Box 435 P. C, 

Pikeville, 432-1898 
Wulfeck. James Andrew, Jr., Ill Burdsall Ave., So. Ft. Mitch- 
ell. 331-3599 
Yeiser, Gerald N., Village Green Apt. 3-G, Fairvievr Ave., 

Bowling Green, 842-6967 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR JANUARY. 1967 



Page Fifteen 



FRANKFORT — CLASS A, REGION 2, CHAMPION 




(Left to Right) Frent Row: Tommy Clay, Larry Robinson. Tommy Bennett. Bill Brown. Jerry Calhoun, 
Mickey Mills, Bobby Bodell. Second Row: John Medlock. Grant Satterly, Ronnie Wig:glesworth, Donnie Wig- 
fflesworth. Granville Coblin. Richard Thornton. Frank Dye, Fantley Smither. Tony Bennassi. Third Row: 
Coach Ollie Leathers, Edward Rail, Mac Quarles, David Cheek, Huston Wells, David Lauffhlin, Ben Smith, 
Danny Luttrell. Frank Goin, Coach Raymond Webb, Coach John Krute. Fourth Row: Coach Bob Shaw, 
Steve Harp, Mike Wise, Mike Clark. Tommy Calhoun, Steve Ritchie, Harold Purvis, Greg Maynard, John 
Barton. 



What Makes A Champion? 

By Fred Russell 

Vice President and Sports Editor 

Nashville (Tenn.) Banner 

EDITOR'S NOTE: WHAT MAKES A CHAMPION? is the 
unique title of the keynote presentation made at the National 
Federation's 47th Annual Meeting at French Lick. Indiana in 
June. 1966. Mr. Russell has been doing sports reporting, feature 
writing and daily columns for over thirty-five years. He is a 
graduate of Yanderbilt University Law School, who. after be- 
ing a practicing attorney, chose the profession of sports writing. 

To be your keynote speaker Ls a rare privilege. You 
gentlemen, as leaders of state high school athletic 
associations, are fortunate to be close to competitive 
sports. I, as a sports writer, am equally lucky. I say 
that not because all of us are in on a lot of excite- 
ment and thrills; that part's fine. But I believe there's 
an even more appealing factor. 

According to my reading of The Bible, the game we 
call Life got off to an unusual start. The Referee ex- 
plained the rules; the rules got broken ri,ght off the 
bat; a penalty was inflicted. You may ask what was 
unusual about that? Well, it was the severity of the 
penalty — banishment forever from the Garden, and the 
guilty man would henceforth have to work for a 
living. 

I start off this way only to try to set up the fact 
that sport is the opposite of work. 

Sport has been with us for a long time, but I'm 
not yet sure of its full meaning. You can look up the 
word sport in the dictionary and find two meanings 
One is "to carry away from work." It means enjoy- 
ment, relaxation. It's the abbreviation of disport, 
which means to divert, to amuse, to make merry. 
Another, and more serious meaning, is "competition 
for a prize, discipline, effort for self-improvement." 
I think these two definitions make for the greatest 
combination in the world. 

I think there are probably higher degrees of happi- 
ness in some things other than sport. But, I say that 
happiness is found most readily in sport, and more pre- 
dictably — by plan — than in almost anything one does. 
I once heard a very learned man say: "Man's great- 
est moment of happiness is to be tested beyond what 
he thought might be his breaking point — and not fail." 

Out of this comes the life of self-improvement, the 
striving for greater achievement. In other words, the 



continuous effort to put into actual practice man's 
limitless potentialities. In this way, records are bro- 
ken year in and year out; the impossible of today 
becomes the average of tomorrow. 

Effort in sport is a matter of character, rather 
than reward. It is an end in itself and not a means 
to an end. That's why, in defeat, one can rest on his 
character and keep a stout heart. 

I make the claim that sport offers the highest- 
grade happiness to man on the most convenient terms 
available anywhere. 

Now to get down to another of its great values — 
and virtues. 

The field of sport is a place "where people can suc- 
ceed — beyond their success anywhere else — in behaving 
themselves while having fun. I'm talking about fair- 
ness. 

Where else do we always give evei^ybody an even 
start and an equal number of times at bat? 

Sport is quick to outlaw any piece of unfairness that 
can be covered or controlled by a rule. But sports- 
manship is more than mere observance of the letter 
of the law. Sportsmanship means obedience to the 
unenforceable. Yet, even the true meaning of sports- 
manship fails to cover another aspect of the fairness 
that pervades sport. I refer to the kindly workings 
of the Law of Averages, and to the fair distribution 
of talents that commonly occurs between teams and 
individuals. Great size and great speed are very sel- 
dom found together in one person; the greatest size 
and the greatest speed — never! ! 

There is a balance, which, to me, somehow, seems 
not totally unrelated to fairness. 

To surpass others is a common aspiration among 
human beings. Sport offers the opportunity, and some 
can succeed. 

To surpass ourselves is even better, and is also a 
common aspiration. Here, sport offers opportunity 
wherein all can succeed. 

Those who succeed to the highest degree are the 
champions. 

What makes a champion in competitive sports? 

Certainly physical ability is an essential ingredient. 
But how many times have you seen the young man of 
exceptional physical ability fail to develop into any 
hind of champion? 

Calisthenics can build up the body. Courses of study 



Page Sixteen 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR JANUARY, 1967 



M. M. I. — CLASS A, REGION 3, DISTRICT 2, CHAMPION 




(Left to Right) Front Row: Joe Berta, Pete Anderson. Bob Best, Rick Redella. Mike Farabaue:h, Gary- 
Long, Tony Stalder, Phi! Warf, John Bizzack. Second Row: Jerry Maynard, Tom Dean, Suk Han Kim, 
Pete Allen, Glenn Dohn, Mitch Nagy, Ralph Keiffer. Dave Hopkins. Third Row: Mark Skulstad, John 
King, John Steele, Dan Jansen, Pres Hall, Richard Creekmore, Joe Unverferth, Skip Hollingsworth. Joe 
Roseberry. Fourth Row: Mgr. David Turner, Charles Tichenor, Mike Lorance, John Graham, Tom Cook, 
Richard DesCombs, Mgr. Warren Greer. 



can train tlie mind. But thie real cliampion is tlie 
person wliose lieart can be educated. 

How? 

There are many ways, but I thinly one stands out. It 
might be called "The Experience of Having Failed." 
Not failing just once, but many times. What I mean is, 
failing in something, and finding out that it wasn't the 
end of the world. 

I believe that a prime factor in the making of a 
champion is this conquering of the fear of making a 
mistake. Later, there comes the realization that with- 
out errors, there could be no competitive sports — ^just 
like there could be no living. 

In practically every moment of competitive athlet- 
ics, there's a mistake, a failure of some kind. We 
think a baseball player with a .300 average is a pretty 
good hitter. Yet that average shows that in 7 out of 
10 times, he has failed. Or in footbadl, a runner gains 
20 yards; somebody missed a tackle. A runner is 
thrown for a 10-yard loss; somebody failed to block. 

When a mistake happens, the potential champion is 
the person who doesn't tuck his tail or blow Ms top. 
He is developing a feel for pressure; he is becoming 
clutch-worthy; he is gaining the championship attitude. 

I like the story about the hill in China, where two 
gangs of coolies, one on each side of the hUl, were 
digging a tunnel. The idea of the engineers was that 
they would meet in the middle. Someone asked the 
foreman: "Suppose they don't meet?" He replied: 
"In that case, we'll have two tunnels." 

So the time comes when an athlete gains that con- 
fidence, that emotional maturity, of being at his best 
when the going is roughest, when he experiences that 
tremendous satisfaction of keeping his presence of 
mind in the deepest difficulty, that genuine joy of be- 
ing able to function in disaster — and finish in style. 
That's the true champion. 

I have been asked: Why does our society give such 
adulation to sports champions? Why do athletes seem 
to be admired the most — more than the successful 
business man, professional man or politician? 

I think we are always eager to pay tribute to excel- 
lence, but in our modern industrial society it becomes 



increasingly harder to identify excellence. The world 
has grown so complex that we don't know whom to 
admire, or for what reasons. With the successful poli- 
tician or business man and professional man, nobody 
really knows how much of their success comes from 
talent and how much from low cunning, from self- 
serving, from politics and publicity and all the other 
highly organized strategies of today. 

But with the athlete it remains clear. He cannot 
fake. He cannot cheat. He cannot use others, or hide 
behind them, or blame them. His excellence is out in 
the open, for everyone to see. We need personal 
heroes, and the champion in athletics is one who can- 
not fool us. He exists on merit, and that's what makes 
it so refreshing. 

In distilling the qualities that make a champion, 
there is skill, of course — a special kind of skiU, pol- 
ished by practice and fully harnessed through under- 
standing. And there are the common denominators of 
determination and pride. But above aU, I think, is 
that quality of emotional balance which enables a per- 
son to operate at his optimum level, regardless of 
the tenseness of the situation. 

In athletics, tension is the No. 1 enemy of top per- 
formance. A competitor in sports has to be loose, has 
to be relaxed, in order to put all his energy and 
strength into his muscles when the brain commands. 
It's my belief that nothing can relieve tension quicker 
than humor — that quality that makes something seem 
funny. 

The person with the best chance to become a cham- 
pion — I think — not only has a backbone and a wish- 
bone—he also has a funny bone. 

Just a smidgen of humor helps, but blessed is he 
who can laugh. Laughter cheers the soul. I regard it 
as the lubrication of the human spirit. Most of the 
champions I've known could laugh. 

I think of you men of the National Federation of 
State High School Athletic Associations as champions 
in your endeavor. I treasure my association with 
Foster Bridges in Tennessee. Throughout the nation, 
there is genuine respect for the vital leadership all of 
you demonstrate, for your splendid contribution in the 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR JANUARY, 1967 



Page Seventeen 



PAINTSVILLE — CLASS A, REGION 4, DISTRICT 2. CHAMPION 




(Left to Right) Front Row: Jim Brugh. Mike Baldwin, Charles Williams, Jim Cox, J. L. Ratliff. Galib 
Kawaja, Harold Taylor. Sid Garland. Marvin Walker. Ronnie Wells. Benny Music. Second Row: Glen 
Taylor, Bill Davis. Randell Taylor. Dan Kinner, Nick Pack. Keith Morris. Wade VanHoose, Bob Stafford, 
Larry Vickers. Danny Burgess. Third Row: Andy Melvin. Larry Setser. Doug Kennard, Joe Porter, Carl 
Melvin, Mike Crothers, Danny Williams, Clarence Meade, Leon Jones. Roy Simpson. Fourth Row: Mffr. 
Gary Fairchild, Mgr. Gregg Burke. Mgr. Ray Powers, Jim Rediford, Will MuUins. 



way you help to make athletics a pattern for living. 
I wish to conclude with some lines which the late 
Grantland Rice, were he writing them today, might 
have dedicated to you men: 

If somebody whispered to me, 

You can have your pick, 

If kind fortune came to woo me 

Where the gold is thick, 

I would still, by hill and hollow, 

Round the world away, 

Stirring deeds of contest follow 

'Til I'm bent and gray. 

Sport is youth and youth's eternal 

Where the flame is bright, 

And our hearts will still be vernal 

When our hair is white. 

And tho' wealth may never love us, 

Say that we have seen. 

That the sky is blue above us. 

And the turf is green. 



BASKETBALL QUESTIONS 

(Continued from Page One) 
ket and falls off so that it does not go through the 
basket. 

Ruling: Technical foul on Bl for unsportsmanlike 
conduct. If circumstances warrant, a flagrant foul 
may be called and two free throws awarded. There 
is no rule provision whereby the official may award 
two points to Team A in lieu of a field goal. See Case 
Book Plays 24 and 2718. 

13. Play: Stationary Bl is guarding Al who has a 
high post position. A2 takes a position with his back to 
Bl and a full step behind Bl. Contact occurs when Bl 
attempts to "stay with his man" (Al) who cuts for 
the basket. 

Ruling: A2 (the screener) has taken a legal position. 
No specific facing is required for screening. The con- 
tact is incidental. 

14. Play: Al jumps into the air while attempting a 
field goal. The momentum carries him forward. Bl, 
who was not in the path of Al when Al left the floor, 
moves into the path of his opponent. In returning to 



the floor. Al comes down on top of Bl. 

Ruling: Intentional foul by Bl. Two free throws are 
awarded Al. If the action by Bl is such that it might 
cause injury to Al. the foul is deemed to be flagrant 
and then Bl must be disqualified. 

15. Play: Al replaces A6. A6 requests a time-out 
which is granted. During the time-out, Al replaces A6. 
The scorers inadventently permit Al to reenter and 
the referee beckons him onto the court. 

Ruling: Unless the official has reason to believe that 
the illegal return of Al was intentional, there is no 
penalty. If the return of Al were deliberate, he is as- 
sessed a technical foul for an unsportsmanlike tactic. 
If the illegal reentry is discovered before the game is 
resumed. Al should be asked to withdraw. If the ir- 
regularity is not discovered until after play is re- 
sumed (clock is started) there is no penalty. 

16. Play: As Al begins a pass, B2 slaps the hand 
of Al while it is holding the ball. 

Ruling: There has been no infraction. Contacting the 
hand of opponent while that hand is on the ball, pro- 
viding the contact is incidental in an attempt to play 
the ball, is not a foul. 

17. Play: Al receives a pass. He throws the baU 
against: (a) the official; or (b) the leg or back of Bl. 
Then Al catches the ball and dribbles. Is this legal? 

Ruling: Double dribble in (a). If the ball is thrown 
against the official, the olayer has completed a drib- 
ble (air dribble) when he catches the ball. He may, 
therefore, not dribble again. In (b) the action is legal. 
Rule 9-5-c permits a player to dribble a second time 
after a pass or a fumble has been touched by another 
player. The coverage in (c) provides that the dribbler 
has lost control when a pass or fumble has been 
touched by another player and if Al again secures 
control, he has the right to dribble again. 

18. Play: Bl touches the ball while a throw-in is in 
the cylinder above the basket or the ball is on the 
basket ring. 

Ruling: Basket interference. Team A is awarded 2 
points. Team B is given the ball for a throw-in, as 
after a scored goal. 

19. Play: Bl is charged with a foul. 

Ruling: Bl is required to raise his hand at ami's 
length above his head. He may not raise or lower it 
in a manner which indicates resentment. After calling 
the foul, the official shall: (a) assume a position near 



Page Eighteen 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR JANUARY, 1967 



and facing tJie player charged with the foul; (b) iden- 
tify the player; (c) hold his position for approximate- 
ly 3 seconds so that the player will have time to raise 
his hand; and (d) penalize any failure to comply with 
the rule. The official shall not ask for nor motion a 
player to raise his hand. 

20. Play: While the ball is touching the ring of the 
basket on a field goal attempt, a player grasps the 
ring. 

Ruling; This is a double infraction. It is both basket 
interference and a technical foul. The moment the 
hand touched the ring, it was basket interference. 
When the player grasped the ring, a technical foul 
occurred. 

21. Play: While rebounding, Al is attempting to tap 
the ball (not a controlled push) into the basket when 
Bl charges into him. The tapped ball: (a) does not go 
into the basket; or (b) goes in. 

Ruling: In both (a) and (b), the foul causes the ball 
to become dead. Al is awarded one free throw and a 
bonus throw, if that circumstance prevails. The tap 
toward the basket is not considered a try and, there- 
fore, there is no continuous motion involved. The ball 
becomes dead even though it is in flight when the 
whistle sounds. 

22. Play: What are the factors which determine the 
legality of player equipment? 

Ruling: The legality of player equipment is based 
on the following criteria: first, no player is permitted 
to wear any equipment which, in the judgment of offi- 
cials, is dangerous to other players. Specifically pro- 
hibited are arm, elbow, finger, hand and wrist guards 
or casts or braces made of sole leather, plaster, metal 
or any other hard substance. These are always illegal, 
even though the hard substances be covered with soft 
padding. No official is permitted to set this provision 
aside. The prohibition of the use of hard substance 
material applies to the finges, hand, wrist, forearm 
and elbow. It does not apply to the upper arm, shoul- 
der, thigh, or lower leg if it is padded or is otherwise, 
in the judgment of the official, not a hazard to other 
players. Even though the rule spells out equipment 
which shall always be declared illegal, it cannot list 
c\ery item specifically. Therefore, as in any code, a 
general category is required, for no list can be as- 
sured of being inclusive. The general category prohib- 
its "any other hard substance" in addition to those 
specified, as not permissible. The second criteria pro- 
vides that equipment, whether hard or not, is illegal if 
it is dangerous to other players. Equipment and items 
worn which could cut or cause an opponent to have 
an abrasion are always prohibited. Thirdly, any equip- 
ment which is unnatural and designed to give a player 
an advantage through the use of this equipment is 
illegal per se. Such equipment just may not be used. 
Fourth, equipment used must have been made for use 
in basketball. Therefore, football face masks and hel- 
mets are not permissible. A player may wear the 
traditional basketball knee brace, if it is properly cov- 
ered or a protector for a broken nose, even though 
made of hard material, if it does not protrude un- 
duly, and if it is not sharp and if is has no cutting 
edges. The same criteria are used to determine 
whether an eyeglass protector is to be used. 

23. Play: Do the rules specify what kind of twine 
must be used for basket nets? 

Ruling: No. However, the rules do require that nets 
must be made of white cord, not less than 120 nor 
more than 144 thread seine twine. The net must be 12 
mesh and 15 to 18 inches in length and, of course, 
flexible. Cotton is the material most frequently used, 
although nets made of nylon twine and which other- 
wise qualify, are legal. 



MINUTES OF BOARD MEETING 

The Board of Control of the Kentucky 
High School Athletic Association met at 
the K.H.S.A.A. building, Lexington, on 
Friday morning, December 23, 1966. The 
meeting was called to order by President 
Sherman Gish at 10:00, with all Board 
members. Commissioner Theo. A. Sanford, 
and Assistant Commissioner J. B. Mansfield 
present. The invocation was given by Pres- 
ton Holland. 

Ralph C. Dorsey moved, seconded by Pres- 
ton Holland, that the reading of the min- 
utes of the October 1st meeting be waived, 
since the members of the Board had re- 
ceived copies of these minutes. The motion 
was carried unanimously. 

The Commissioner reported that the 1966 
football championship playoffs had been 
very successful, with increased attendance 
at the preliminary and final games. He rec- 
ommended that each of the four teams par- 
ticipating in f^e playoffs in Lexington be 
allowed an additional amount of $200.00 for 
incidental expenses. Don Davis moved, sec- 
onded by Oran C. Teater, that the appropri- 
ations recommended be allowed. The motion 
was carried unanimously. 

Foster J. Sanders, Chairman of the Tro- 
phy Committee, reported that his Commit- 
tee had met at the K.H.S.A.A. office on 
October 22, 1966, at which time sealed bids 
for the 1967 district and regional basketball 
trophies were opened. He stated that the 
Committee accepted the bids of The Sport 
Shop, Glasgow, Kentucky, for both district 
and regional trophies. The price per set of 
the district trophies was $40.00, and the 
price per set of the regional trophies was 
$50.00. 

Foster J. Sanders moved, seconded by Don 
Davis, that the next Board meeting be held 
in Louisville on January 21, 1966; and that 
the summer meeting of the Board be held 
in the Kentucky Lake area late in July, on 
a date when lodging could be arranged by 
the Commissioner. The motion was carried 
unanimously. 

President Gish announced the appoint- 
ment of Rev. Richard Grenough and Greg 
Bobrow to membership on the State Swim- 
ing Committee. The Commissioner recom- 
mended that the Aquatics chairman of the 
Kentucky D.G.W.S. each year be a member 
of the State Swimming Committee by virtue 
of the office. Don Davis moved, seconded by 
Oran C. Teater, that the recommendation of 
the Commissioner be made a Board policy. 
The motion was carried unanimously. 

The Commissioner read a letter from 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR JANUARY, 1967 



Page Nineteen 



Prin. Russell Garth of the Atherton High 
School concerning possible sanction of an 
invitational track meet to be held during the 
week following the state meets. The Com- 
missioner had sent to each member of the 
Board of Control a copy of his reply to Mr. 
Garth, in which he stated that it was his 
considered opinion that the Board would not 
give its sanction to the type of meet men- 
tioned. Oran C. Teater moved, seconded by 
Foster J. Sanders, that the position of the 
Commissioner as outlined in his letter to 
Mr. Garth be sustained and approved. The 
motion was carried unanimously. 

The Commissioner read letters from Prin. 
Roy T. Reasor of the Fleming-Neon High 
School and from Prin. Henry E. Wright of 
the Jenkins High School requesting that 
the schools be placed in Class A, District 2 
of Region IV, for the 1967 and 1968 football 
seasons. After a considerable discussion of 
these requests, Morton Combs moved, sec- 
onded by Don R. Rawlings, that the requests 
of Prin. Roy T. Reasor of Fleming-Neon and 
Prin. Henry E. Wright of Jenkins be grant- 
ed. The motion was carried unanimously. 

The Commissioner reported that he had 
imposed a penalty on the Owensboro High 
School for violation of K.H.S.A.A. By-Law 
17, Practice of Sportsmanship, during and 
following the Owensboro-Henderson football 
game played on November 4, 1966. He stat- 
ed that he had placed the school on proba- 
tion for a period of two years and that he 
had made the school ineligible for the 1967 
football playoffs. 

Oran C. Teater moved, seconded by Pres- 
ton Holland, that all bills of the Association 
for the period beginning October 1, 1966, 
and ending November 30, 1966, be allowed. 
The motion was carried unanimously. 

There being no further business, the 
meeting adjourned. 



FILMS 



By-Laws 7 and 17 

By-Law 7-2 provides that an official who has dis- 
qualified a player shall report the name of the player 
to the principal of the home team school, and that tlie 
Commissioner shall be notified of such action imme- 
diately by the principal. Only the home principal or 
his representative is involved in this situation. It is 
not necessary that the official make a report to the 
Commissioner on the disquaUfi cation unless in his 
opinion the conduct of the player is so unsportsman- 
like that serious trouble might have developed. In 
such an event, the officials should make reports. If 
the principal of either school involved is in doubt 
concerning whether or not a troublesome incident 
should be reported under the provisions of By-Law 17, 
he should make a written report. 



The films listed below are in the Film Library of the Uni- 
versity of Kentucky College of Education. The rental prices 
shown do not apply to schools which nse one of the special 
subscriptions serrice plans, offered by the Bureau of Audio- 
visual Materials. 

Baseball 

BASEBALL ALL-STAR GAME OF 1956, j-s-c-a, 2 
reels, color, $1.00 

The All-star Game of 1956 was played in Griffith 
Stadium at Washington. Stars of the American and 
National Leagues are pictured in action during the 
pre-game activities. Highlights of the game are shown 
as the National League wins by a score of 7-3. 
BASEBALL ALL-STAR GAME OF 1958, j-s-c-a, 2 
reels, color, $1.00 

Twenty-five all-stars from tlie Ameiican League 
defeat an equal number of National League greats by 
a score of 4-3 at Baltimore. Close-ups of the baseball 
stars of today and interesting plaj's of the game are 
shown in the film (KHSAA). 

BASEBALL AUL-STAR GAME OF 1965, e-j-s-e-a, 2 
reels, color, $1.00 

In the 36th all-star baseball game at the home of 
the Minnesota Twins in Minneapolis the National 
League conquered the American League by 6-5. A 
crowd of over 47,000 saw Wilhe Mays hit the first 
pitch of the game for a home run. (KHSAA) 
BASEBALL FOR MILLION, j-s-c-a, 3 reels, color, 
$1.00 

In this film a colorful Big League Manager and an 
outstanding student of the game naiTates play situa- 
tions covering the official interpretation of a panorama 
of basic rules involving batting, pitching, base run- 
ning, and fielding. It is recommended for use by offi- 
cials, coaches, players and fans. 

BASEBALL HALL OF FAME, e-j-s-c-a, 3 reels, color, 
$1.00 

This film shows the annual meeting at Coopers- 
towTi, New York, when new names are added to the 
Hall of Fame list. Numerous stars of the past return 
to the shrine each year at this time and are shown as 
their feats on the diamond are related. The history of 
Cooperstown and the purpose of the Hall of Fame are 
explained in the picture. 
BATTER UP, e-j-s-c-a, 2 reels (22 JMin.), color, $1.00. 

Produced by National and American Leagues of 
Baseball. Shows the proper techniques of batting as 
demonstrated by hitting stars of the majors, Stan 
Musial, Ted WiUiams, Mickey Mantle, Ernie Banks, 
Willie Mays and others. 
BATTING FUNDAMENTALS, j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $1.50 

Basic skUls which must be mastered before one 
becomes an accomplished hitter. Bat selection, stance, 
grip, stride, swing and foUow-through are clearly dem- 
onstrated in this film by professional players. 
THE BATTING STARS OF BASEBALL, s-c-a, 3 reels, 
$1.00 

Who are the big names among batters and what 
makes them good? Watch the featured hitters as 
shown in this film, learn the secrets of their styles 
and forms, and try it yourself. For clubs as well as 

CATCHING IN BASEBALL, e-j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $1.50 
The basic skiUs in catching baseball are presented 

in this film. How to catch a high rapid bedl, a batted 

ball, a thrown ball, and a ground ball are shown. 

Stance, motion and close-up photography are used to 

enable the viewer to foUow each step or movement in 

each of the basic skills. 

CATCHING STARS OF BASEBALL, j-s-c-a, 2 reels, 
$1.00 
This is a fitai designed to assist in the coaching 



Page Twenty' 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR JANUARY, 196i 



SOUTHLAND SPORT SHOP 

348 Southland Drive Phone 277-3977 Lexington, Ky. 

J. A. McFadden, School Rep. 

649 Northside Drive 



Lex., Ky. Phone 299-1635 
IN STOCK— for immediate delivery by UPS 

All Star Cotton socks— sized 10, 11, 12, 13 

Coat Style sweaters 

6" Chenille letters (plain) 2-3 weeks 

J & J Speed Pack tape 

Adidas Track shoes & Flats 

Knit Baseball Uniforms 

#68 Baseballs (excellent for practice) 

#95 Official league baseballs 

Lou Slugger bats # Adirondack "Pro" Bats 

Nylon warmup jackets — 5 colors 

Trophies — in stock in all price ranges 

Engraved in our store for quick delivery 

Most all baseball and track items in stock for 
quick shipment 

Collect calls accepted on all orders 

SOUTHLAND SPORT SHOP 

Gene Stokley Dick Wallace 



? 4.50dz 
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of catchers but it is also interesting and entertaining. 
Correct methods and techniques or receiving, throw- 
ing, signaling and fielding are illustrated by Bill 
Dict:ey, Sherman LoUar, Yogi Berra and Roy Campa- 
nella. 
DEMOCRACY OF BASEBALL, e-j-s-c-a, 2 reels, $1.00 

The purpose of this film is for further development 
of young baseball players in our modem democracy 
and illustrates this through sports and sports compe- 
tition. This film includes a brief history of baseball 
along with a cavalcade of past and present stars. 
DOUBLE-PLAY KINGS OF BASEBALL, j-s-c-a, 2 
reels, $1.00 

This film presents an analysis of the double play in 
baseball. Different players from several major leagues 
are shown in action. Fielding, tagging, and throwing 
are illustrated and e.xplained. 
FIFTY YEARS OF BASEBALL, e-j-s-c-a, 3 reels, $1.00 

Facts of the immortal stars of baseball are recalled 
in this fifty years of memories. Shows some famous 
oldtimers as their exploits are narrated and great mo- 
ments of action in the lives of the more recent base- 
ball heroes. (KHSAA) 
HITTING IN BASEBALL, e-j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $1.50 

Slow motion and close-up photography are used to 
follow accurately and graphically tihe basic fundamen- 
tals of hitting in baseball. Coordination of feet, legs, 
hips, shoulders, arm, and head is explained. How to 
select a bat, how to hold it, and correct batting posi- 
tion are shown. 

INFIELD PLAY AT 1st AND 3rd, e-j-s-c-a, 2 reels, 
$1.00 

The fundamentals and finer points of infield play at 
first and third base are illustrated by big league play- 
ers. Fielding, stance, throwing, tagging runners, etc., 
pictured often in slow motion. Sponsored by A. G. 



Spalding Co., The American and National Leagues. 
INSIDE BASEBALL, j-s-c-a, 3 reels, $1.00 

Fundamentals of baseball, including pitching, ba' 
ting, fielding, and base-running, are demonstratec 
Note: This film was placed with the library throug 
the courtesy of the Kentucky High School Athleti 
Association. 
OFFICIAL BASEBALL, e-j-s-c-a, 3 reels, color, ?1.C 

Informative and entertaining play situations use 
to depict official rules interpretations covering th 
phases of batting, pitching, base running, fielding an 
umpiring. Stimulates interest and knowledge for fan; 
players, officials and baseball administrators. 
PITCHING STARS OF BASEBALL, e-j-s-c-a, 2 reeL 
$1.00 

Shows four of the leading pitchers in action. Type 
of pitches and methods of practice are portrayed. 
PLAY BALL, SON, j-s, IVo reels, $2.50 

Joe Cronin introduces this film showing a group ( 
fourt en-year-old boys; who are experts in basebal 
Correct methods of hitting, catching, and throwing at 
demonstrated in natural and slow motion. Based o 
book by Bert V. Dunne. 
STRIKE THREE, j-s-e-a, 2 reels, color, $1.00 

Designed to train pitchers. The greatest pitchers i 
the game today show the pitching and fielding finess 
that brought them fame. 
THROWING IN BASEBALL, e-j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $1.50 

Slow motion, close-up and stop photography are use 
in presenting the basic fundamentals of throwing i 
baseball. Instructions are given for the overthrowi 
three-quarter side, side, and underhand throws. Coo: 
dination of foot and arm motion is stressed, as well a 
coordination of the body as a whole. 

(Continued in February Issue) 



The KINGDEN Company 

LIFE DEPARTMENT 

121-123 Lafayelle Ave. 
Scholastic, Alhlelic, . p q. Box 7100 

Life, Accident - Heallh, Lexington, Kentucliy 40502 

Special Risks. Telephone 254-4095 

January 10, 1967 



Dear Reader : 

How about a change of pace? 

For a good many years you have seen our ads in this space. You 
may have decided that they are repetitious, lacking in imagin- 
ation, or even inept. 

You may be right. But consider our dilemma. Our product is 
intangible until it is needed - then it becomes very tangible 
indeed - in terms of prompt service and hard cash to pay the 
expenses of an injury. 

Intangibles cannot be readily shown by pictures or charts in 
ads. Our interest in and understanding of your problems are 
real. Our years of experience in providing the best coverage 
and claim service at a realistic price are also real. The fact 
that the cheapest is rarely the best or most serviceable has 
been proven over and over. 

But, how do you express these facts? We try in two ways: 

1. By the use of our simple ads. 

2. By trying every day to make our coverages and service 
the best avai labl e. 

Now, we'll probably revert to the same old ads. In the meantime, 
if you want proof of our statements, why not ask some of our 
clients. There are several near you. 

S i ncerel y, 

THE KINGDEN COMPANY 



'-ZTT^^O^ 



J. (0. McCreary, Mana 
Life Department 

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K.H.S. A. A. TOURNAMENT DIRECTORS 

District and Regional Tournament Directors can get all of their supplies 
and needs to run a tournament from Hunt's. We have the merchandise 
listed below in stock for immediate shipment. Call or write us your needs. 

BASKETBALLS 

Get the feel of a basketball same as will be used in the State Tournament in 
Louisville in your District or Regional Tournament. We have the following: 

No. AFR Last Bilt ball made by Spalding. 

No. ARX panel lock molded ball endorsed by Coach Adolph Rupp 

and used by the University of Kentucky Basketball Team. 

Both of these balls will definitely be used in the State Tournament 

in Louisville. 

ADMISSION TICKETS 

Complete stock of admission tickets, 2,000 tickets to the roll, printed with 
established admission prices and numbered consecutively. Also PASS OUT 
tickets, ADMIT ONE tickets, all in different colors. $1.25 per roll of 2,000. 

TROPHIES AND AWARDS 

We can take care of your Sportsmanship trophies, individual charms for 
All-Star teams. All-Tournament teams, etc. Our stock is complete and we 
can engrave and ship to you at once. 

ACCESSORIES 

Nets, scorebooks, first-aid supplies, whistles, stopwatches, timers' horns, 
powdered resin, bath towels, shoe laces, colored top sweat socks, carry-all 
bags. All of this merchandise in stock for at once delivery. 

BANKS AND GOALS 

We have a complete stock of fan-shaped steel, fan-shaped wood, and fan- 
shaped glass backboards complete with goals and nets in stock for at once 
delilvery. A phone call will get them off to you at once. 

FAIR-PLAY ELECTRIC BASKETBALL SCOREBOARDS 

We have IN STOCK the Tick-A-Way FF-IS Fair-Play in our warehouse 
ready for immediate shipment. A call will get one to your gymnasium 
before tournament time. 

Turn all of your needs over to us. We will be glad to handle them for you. 
ROY BOYD, JIM MITCHELL, WADE BURLESON or C. A. BYRN, JR. 
are always ready to assist you in every way possible. 

If you want the BEST QUALITY and the BEST SERVICE contact HUNT'S 

HUNTS ATHLETIC GOODS, Inc. 

CH 7-1941 — PHONES — CH 7-1942 

MAYFIELD, KENTUCKY 
PHONE 451-0576 LOUISVILLE, KY. 



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^fmio.' 











(Left to Right] Front Row: Richard Watl<ins, Gary Evans, Richard Calhoun, Paul Robinette, 
Gordon Ferman, David Sutton, Robert Ballard, Dana Koch, Russell Gibson, Steve Craig. 
Second Row: Keith King, Tim McDaniels, Roxie Holton, Jerome Perry, Tommy Flood, 
Wilbur Hackett, Arthur Knight, Bill Paris, Arnold Drury, Rickey Underwood, Stanford 
White. Third Row: Lester Morrison, David Marshall, Richard Benz, Richard Reynolds, Bill 
Zimmerman, David Plato, Nelson Ratchford, Gary Tatum, Lenard Hargrove, William 
Schultz, Ronnie Englert. Fourth Row: Nat Hutchson, Loyd McGee, Calvin Davis, Clarence 
Frank, Kenneth Bivens, Rick Hutchinson, Jeffery Moody, James Mathis. 



Manual 40 — Bishop David 
Manual 27 — Shawnee 
Manual 41 — St. Xavier 13 
Manual 31 — Central 7 
Manual 51 — Atherton 



14 



Manual 20 — Flaget 7 
Manual 48 — Trinity 7 
Manual 6 — Paducah 
Manual 25 — ^DeSalea 



PLAYOFF 
Manual 33 — Butler 



Official Organ of the 

KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION 

February, 1967 



A 






Letter From the Commissioner 

To the District Tournament Managers: 

Will you please refer to your K.H.S.A.A. 
booklet which gives rules and regulations 
governing basketball tournaments. You 
should familiarize yourself with these rules, 
found on pages 30-38. Your special attention 
is called to the second paragraph of Tourna- 
ment Rule VI-A-3, relative to the enrollment 
of your district coaches in the Kentucky 
High School Coaches Association. 

The forms for your various reports are 
self-explanatory. The report of games 
should be mailed to the manager of the 
regional tournament not later than Monday, 
March 6. Send your financial report, your 
checked eligibility lists, and the second copy 
of the report of games to the Commissioner 
as soon after the tournament as possible. 
For your convenience, the following check 
list is given: 

1. Invite member schools to your tourna- 
ment AT ONCE, reminding each school to 
send each other member school in the dis- 
trict a COMPLETE preliminary list of play- 
ers on or before February 1, and to send you 
THREE copies of a final list one week prior 
to the district tournament. See Rule VHI. 

2. Announce the time of drawings in 
your letter. See Rule IX. 

3. At your meeting, conduct the draw- 
ing and select the officials. The state plan 
for division of tournament receipts is recom- 
mended. If any other plan is used, a major- 
ity vote of the participating schools must 
be obtained. 

4. Your attention is called to the last 
paragraph of Tournament Rule V-A, which 
says: "An official shall not work a district 
or regional tournament in the district or 
region in which he resides." Also note the 
provisions of Tournament Rule V-C concern- 
ing twelve first team high school basketball 
games. 

5. The following procedure has been es- 
tablished by the Board of Control in the 
selection of tournament officials under au- 
thority given in Tournament Rule V-A: (a) 
Each school represented at the meeting may 
submit the names of one or more officials. 
There shall be a minimum of eight names 
on the list of officials to be voted on. NO 
NAME SHALL BE MARKED OFF THE 
LIST, (b) Each school representative shall 
rank eight officials in the order of his pref- 
erence, the first choice being assigned eight 
points, the second seven points, etc. _(c) The 
tournament manager shall communicate at 
once with the highest ranking official or 
officials in order of their rank. If the offi- 
one hour of the time of his selection, or if 
cial who is selected cannot be reached within 



he is not available, the tournament manage: 
shall attempt to employ the next official o 
officials on the list in the order of the! 
selection. If the tournament manager at 
tempts to contact the official by telephone 
and there is no answer, the manager shouL 
check with the operator for a possibl 
change in the official's number, (d) If tw 
officials are tied on points, the highest rank 
ing official shall be determined by flippin; 
a coin, (e) If none of the officials on th 
list is available, the tournament manage 
shall have the sole responsibility of securin, 
an official or officials for the tournameni 

6. Tournament Rule XV says: "Th 
Board of Control is authorized to seleci 
standardize, and purchase trophies for a 
district and regional tournaments and th 
cost of these trophies shall be borne by th 
respective districts and regions." The Boar 
has contracted with The Sport Shop, Glas 
gow, Kentucky, to supply all of the officii 
K.H.S.A.A. district first place and secon 
place basketball trophies for the 1967 toui 
naments, each trophy complete with th 
Association seal and engraving. Your tn 
phies will be shipped to you prior to Marc 
1. 

7. It is the responsibility of the tournj 
ment manager to secure adequate polic 
protection. 

8. THE BOARD OF CONTROL HA 
RULED THAT NOT MORE THAI 
TWELVE PLAYERS MAY BE IN UN: 
FORM FOR ANY ONE TOURNAMEN 
GAME, AND THAT OTHER SQUA: 
MEMBERS SHALL NOT BE ALLOWE: 
TO PARTICIPATE IN WARM-UP EXEI 
CISES, THIS BEING IMPLIED IN TOUI 
NAMENT RULE XI. 

9. Please ask your officials to designal 
the goals prior to the warm-up time fc 
each game. 

10'. You will receive three copies of 
final eligibility list from each school. Ha\ 
one of these checked by the coach of eac 
competing team, before his team plays, ft 
the twelve players he willl use in each gam- 
,Use only one list for checking players o 
each team since the other two copies ma 
be needed by the regional and state toum: 
ment managers. Send the Commissioner a 
of these checked copies with your othf 
reports. Send the two unchecked copies c 
eligibility lists of the winner and runner-u 
to the manager of your regional toumj 
ment, along with one copy of your report c 
games, not later than March 6. 

11. It has been ruled that the 2:0 
o'clock mentioned in Tournament Rule IV-: 
may be considered Eastern Standard Tim 
(Continued on Page Eleven) 



The Kentucky High School Athlete 

Official Organ of the 
Kentucky High School Athletic Association 



VOL. xxrx— NO. 7 



FEBRUARY, 1967 



Jl.OO Per Year 



Basketball Questions 

These rulings do not set aside nor modify any rule. 
They are interpretations for some of the early season 
situations which have been presented. 

Clifford B. Fagan 

23. Play: The jersey is blue. The front and back 
■r^umbers are legal in size. The stroke or bar (basic 
part) of the numbers is the same color as that of the 
jersey. Each number has a one-fourth inch white bor- 
der. 

Ruling: Illegal number. This interpretation is by 
individual item action on the part of the committee for 
the purpose of removing any doubt regarding the ille- 
gality of outlined numbers. To be legal, the stroke or 
bar of the number must be of solid color contrasting 
with ithe color of the shirt. The color of the border 
of the number, when used, is not specified in the rule. 

24. Play: Al is at the foul line prior to attempting 
an awarded free throw. As he addresses the basket, 
the home spectators are cheering wildly. Al places the 
Ibali under his arm, walks out of the circle, and re- 
fquests the official to ask the spectators to be quiet 
while he is shooting. 

Ruling: This is a free throw violation by the offen- 
sive team w.hich ends the free throw attempt. 

Commemt: The rules do not protect a player from 
crowd noise. Provisions governing "disconcerting acts" 
during a free throw apply only to opposing players. 
Even if the opponents were, in the opinion of the free 
throw shooter, "disconcerting," he may not walk out 
of the circle during the free throw (while the ball is 
alive) . 

25. Play: After a successful field goal or free throw, 
Bl and B2 are out of bounds at the end of the court. 
Bl throws the ball to B2 who passes it inbounds to 
B3. Bl is still out of bounds when he throws the ball 
to B3 on the court. 

Ruling: Bl should be moving toward or onto the 
court when the pass to B3 is made. If Bl has not pur- 
posely delayed his return to the court there has been 
no violation. However, if Bl has intentionally delayed 
his return (which would usually be for the purpose of 
deception) Bl has committed a technical foul. 

26. Play: Al jumps to make a pass. He sees that 
his pass will be intercepted so he drops the ball to the 
floor and dribbles into an unguarded area where be 
makes a try cmd scores a field goal. 

Ruling: Al has committed a running violation by 
starting a dribble illegally. His goal does not count 
and the ball is awarded to an opponent at the spot out 
of bounds nearest where the violation occurred. 

27. Play: After receiving the ball with only the right 
foot on the floor, Al places his left foot on the floor 
behind his right foot. 

Ruling: He may pivot, using the right foot, but he 
may not pivot with the left foot. Al may dribble but 
the ball must leave his hands before the right foot (in 
this case, the front foot) leaves the floor. 

28. Play: Bl pushes Al. Al then kicks at Bl but does 
not make contact. 



Ruling: False double foul. Foul by Bl is personal. 
Al has committed a technical foul. Free throws are 
awarded because this is not a double foul. A jump at 
the center circle between any two opponents follows 
the last of the free throws. 

29. Play: Al and Bl simultaneously foul each other 
and, at the same instant, B2 fouls A2. 

Ruling: This combination constitutes a false double 
foul of which one of the elements is a double foul. 
No free throws are awarded for the double foul (Al 
and Bl). The free throw, or throws, resulting from 
the foul by B2 are awarded A2. The ball becomes 
dead after the last free throw by A2 and then is put 
in play by a jump ball at the center between any two 
opponents. 

30. Play: For a free throw by Al, Bl is in the first 
space and A2 in the second space. Is it legal for A2 to 
leave his space as soon as the ball is in flight, and 
may he move into the 4-foot space behind the plane of 
the backboard? 

Ruling: It is permissible for A2 to back out of his 
space after the ball is in flight but he may not enter 
the first space until the ball has touched the ring or 
the backboard, or the free throw has ended. The first 
space is 7 feet wide and 3 feet in depth. Therefore, A2 
must be at least 3 feet from the lane back of the first 
space until the ball touches the ring or the backboard, 
or the free throw has ended. 

31. Play: A throw-in by Al is touched but not con- 
trolled by a teammate. Ball then lies on the floor in 
team A's back court with no one securing control. 

Ruling: Following a reasonable time period, the 
referee should declare the ball dead. He will award it 
out of bounds to team A and direct them to put the 
ball in play and to attempt to advance it. If A does 
not comply with the referee's order, the referee 
should penalize that team with a technical foul. 

32. Play: From behind the plane of the backboard: 
(a) a throw-in is such that some part of the ball passes 
above the backboard without touching any of the sup- 
ports; or (b) a try for a field goal is such that some 
part of the ball passes above the backboard without 
touching any supports. 

Ruling: If the rectangular board is used, the ball 
remains dead in (a) and becomes dead in (b). If the 
fan-shaped backboard is used, the Uve or dead status 
of the ball is not affected by the ball passing over the 
board itself. 

33. Play: Bl pushes Al while Al is trying for a field 
goal. A2 interferes with the ball on the ring or the bas- 
ket cylinder. 

Ruling: The violation by A2 causes the ball to be- 
come dead. Therefore, it is an unsuccessful try and Al 
is awarded two free throws. This is one of the few sit- 
uations in which a foul and a violation occur during 
the same Mve ball. 

34. Play: Near the expiration of time for the second 
quarter, Al is fouled. Time expires while the ball is in 
flight on a try. The foul occurs before the basket is 
made or missed. 

(Continued on Page Nine) 



Page Two 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR FEBRUARY, 1967 



FEBRUARY, 1967 



VOL. XXIX— NO. 7 



Published monthly, except June and July, by the Kentucky 

High School Athletic Association 

Office of Publication, Lexington, Ky. 40501 

Second class postage paid at Lexington, Kentucky. 

Editor THEO. A. SANFORL 

Aasistant Editor J. B. MANSFIELL 

Lexington, Ky. 
BOARD OF CONTROL 

President Sherman Gish (1963-67). Greenvilli 

Vice-President Don Davis (1963-67), Independence 

Oirectors — Morton Combs (1964-68), Carr Creek; Ralph C 
Dorsey (1966-70), Horse Cave; Preston Holland (1965-69; 
Murray; Don R. Rawlings (1965-69), Danville; Foster .> 
Sanders (1966-70), Louisville: Gran C. Teater (1964-68,, 
Paintsville. 

Subscription Rate $1.9» Per Year 

-f%om the Commissionei s Dffice 



1, 

2. 

3. 

4, 

5. 

6. 

7. 

8 

9. 
10. 
11. 
12. 
13. 
14. 
15. 
16. 
17. 
18. 
19. 
20. 
21. 
22. 
23. 
25. 
26. 
27. 
29. 
30. 
31. 
32. 
33, 



1967 District Tournament Sites 

Carlisle County 34. Covington Cath. 
Paducah Tilghman35. Newport 
Lowes 36. Campbell County 

Murray Univ. 37. Harrison County 
Livingston Cent. 38. Pendleton 
Henderson 39. Mason County 

West Hopkins 40. George R. Clark 
Christian County41. Woodford County 
Owensboro 42. Jessamine County 

Muhlenberg Cent. 43. Lafayette 
Breck. County 44. Model 

45. Boyle County 

46. Russell County 

47. Somerset 

48. London 

49. Annville Institute 

50. Barbourville 

51. Bell County 

52. James A. Cawood 

53. Kingdom Come 

54. Hazard 

55. Breathitt 



Leitchfield 

Russell ville 

Bowling Green 

Glasgow 

Metcalfe County 

Elizabethtown 

Hart Memorial 

Bardstown 

Campbellsville 

Valley 

Central 



Thomas Jefferson56. Lee County 
Louisville Male 57. Louisa 



Westport 
.Atherton 
Taylorsville 
Henry County 
Gallatin County 
Scott County 
Boone County 



58. Martin 

59. Virgie 

60. Johns Creek 

61. Univ. Breck. 

62. Prichard 

63. McKell 

64. Paul G. Blazer 



1967 Regional Tournament Sites 

(1) Murray State University, (2) Union 
County High School, (3) Owensboro Sports- 
center, (4) Western Kentucky University, 
(5) Campbellsville High School, (6) Freedom 
Hall, (7) Freedom Hall, (8) Henry County 
High School, (9) Campbell County High 
School, (10) Mason County High School, 
(11) Eastern Kentucky University, (12) 
Danville High School, (13) Harlan High 
School, (14) Hazard High School, (15) 
Prestonsburg High School, (16) Paul G. 
Blazer High School. 




Dutchman Honored 

Charlie Vettiner, Jefferson County play- 
ground and recreation superintendent, the 
K.H.S.A.A.'s veteran basketball clinic direc- 
tor and Flying Dutchman, was named Lou- 
isville Man of the Year for 1966 by WHAS 
Radio-TV News on a special news roundup 
program presented on January 1. Barry 
Bingham, president of WHAS, the Courier- 
Journal and the Louisville Times, made the 
presentation. 

Mr. Vettiner was lauded for leadership in 
recreation "which has earned him a national 
reputation." The county's parks chief was 
especially praised for his efforts to alert the 
public and elected officials about the need 
to acquire parks now for needs in the future. 

News About Swimming 

The 1967 Class AAA State High School 
Swimming Meet will be held at the Planta- 
tion Swim Club pool, Louisville, on February 
24-25, the Class AA meet at the University 
of Kentucky pool, Lexington, on March 24- 
25. The meet for girls will be held on Friday 
at each location, beginning at 1:00 P.M.; 
the meet for boys on Saturdav, beginning at 
9:00 A.M. 

Class AAA will include those high schools 
with an enrollment of 800 or more (grades 
10-12), and Class AA will include those 
schools with an enrollment of less than 800. 
All-male or all-female schools with an enroll- 
ment of 400 or more are placed in Class 
AAA. Any school may enter a class above 
its classification. General regulations con- 
cerning the meets appear in the K.H.S.A.A. 
booklet. In the booklet list of events appears 
the 200 Yard Freestyle Relay. The event 
should have been listed as the 400 Yard 
Freestyle Relay. All rules appearing in the 
1967 scholastic section of the N.C.A.A. 
Swimming Guide will be followed unless 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR FEBRUARY, 1967 

there is some difference between these regu- 
lations and those adopted by the Board of 
Control. In such an event, K.H.S.A.A. rules 
will prevail. 

Only those swimmers who qualify for the 
finals will be given expense allowances for 
transportation, lodging, and meals. 



Page Three 



Certified Official 

Curt Selvy has qualified recently as a 
Certified basketball official. 



TRACK ASSIGNMENTS 

Track regulations adopted by the Board of Control 
provide that the state shall be divided into classes and 
regions by the Commissioner who will assign the 
schools to the regional sites. The 1967 assignments 
are as follows: 

TRACK— GIRLS 

Paducah Region — Ballard Memorial, Calloway County, Chris- 
tian County, Daviess County, Lone Oak, Madisonville, Murray, 
North Marshall, Paducah Tilghman, Reidland, St. Mary (Padu- 
cah), Webster County, West Hopkins. 

Glasgow Region — Adair County, Bowling Green, Franklin- 
Simpson, Greenville, Hiseville, Metcalfe County, Ohio County, 
Park City, Russellville, Temple Hill, Warren County. 

Fort Knox Region— Bardstown, Bloomfield, Campbellsville, 
Fort Knox, Hancock County. Henderson, Henderson County, 
LaRue County, Meade County, North Hardin, Old Kentucky 
Home. Owensboro, Taylor County. 

West Jefferson — Angela Merici, Central, Holy Rosary, Lo- 
retto, Louisville Male. Ursuline Academy, Valley, Western. 

East Jefferson Region — Carroll County, Durrett, Eastern, 
Fern Creek. Kentucky School for the Blind, Lady of Mercy, 
Oldham County. Sacred Heart, Shelbyville, Shelby County. 

Lexington Region — Anderson. Franklin County, Harrison 
County, Harrodsburg, Henry Clay, Jessamine County, Lexing- 
ton Catholic. Paris, Pendleton County, Sayre. Scott County, 
Silver Grove, Tates Creek. 

Richmond Region — Boyle County, Bush, Corbin, Danville, 
Evarts, Hazel Green, London, Lynn Camp, Madison, Madison 
Central. Montgomery County. Monticello. 

Morehead Region — Flat Gap, Fleming County, Louisa, Mason 
County. Paintsville, Paul G. Blazer, Prestonsburg. Prichard, 
Raceland, Rowan County, Russell, University Breckinridge, 
Wurtland. 

TRACK— CLASS A BOYS 

Paducah Region — Attucks. Ballard Memorial, Calhoun, Fort 
Campbell, Fulton, Murray, Providence, Reidland, St. Mary, 
South Hopkins, South Marshall. Trigg County. 

Glasgow Region — Austin-Tracy, Caverna, Cumberland Coun- 
ty, Edmonson County, Gamaliel, Hiseville, Metcalfe County, 
Park City, Russellville, Temple Hill. Tompkinsville, Warren 
County. 

Fort Knox Region— Bardstown, Bloomfield, Campbellsville, 
Caneyville, Clarkson, Cub Run, Grayson County Catholic, 
Hancock County, Kentucky School for the Blind, Leitchfield, 
Liouisville Country Day, Munfordville, West Hardin. 

Bellevue — Beechwood. Bellevue, Carroll County. Dayton, Emi- 
nence, Falmouth, Grant County, Ludlow, Nicholas County, 
Trimble County. 

Lexington Region — Anderson, Burgin, Frankfort, George- 
town. Good Shepherd, Harrodsburg, Lexington Catholic, Mer- 
cer County. Millersburg Military Institute, Paris, Sayre, Scott 
County, Shelbyville, Washington County. 

Richmond Region — Berea, Garrard County, Irvine. Jackson, 
Kentucky School for the Deaf, Madison, Monticello. Mt. Ver- 
non. Pulaski, Shopville. 

Barbourville Region — Barbourville, Bush. Corbin, Fleming- 
Neon, Harlan, Hazard. Hazel Green, Jenkins, Lily, London, 
Lynch. Lynn Camp. McCreary County, Pineville, Riverside. 

Morehead Region — Blaine. Elkho»-n City, Flat Gan. Johns 
Creek, Louisa, Morgan County, Mullins, Paintsville. Pike- 
ville, Prichard, Raceland, University Breckinridge, Wurtland. 

TRACK— AA BOYS 

Paducah Region — Caldwell County, Calloway County, Chris- 
tian County, Hopkinsville, Lone Oak, Mayfield. North Mar- 
shall, Paducah Tilghman. 

Henderson County Region — Daviess County, Henderson, Hen- 
derson County. Madisonville. Ohio County, Owensboro, Owens- 
boro Catholic, Union County, Webster, County. 

Glasgow Region — Adair County, Bowling Green, Butler 
County, Franklin Simpson. Glasgow, Greensburg, LaRue Coun- 
ty, Wayne County. 

Fort Knox Region — Breckinridge County, East Hardin, 



Elizabethtown, Fort Knox, Henry County, Kentucky Military 
Institute, Meade County, North Hardin, Oldham County, Old 
Kentucky Home, St. Joseph, Shepherdsville, Shelby County. 

Bellevue Region — Boone County, Campbell County, Covington 
Catholic, Dixie Heights, Highlands, Holmes, Lloyd Memorial, 
Newport, Newport Catholic, Pendleton County, Simon Kenton. 

Lexington Region— Bourbon County, Bryan Station, Dunbar, 
George Rogers Clark, Harrison County. Henry Clay, Jessa- 
mine County, Lafayette, Tates Creek, Woodford County. 

Richmond Region — Bell County, Boyle County, Clay County, 
Cumberland, Danville, Evarts, James A. Cawood, Knox Cen- 
tral, Madison Central, M. C. Napier, Montgomery County, 
Somerset, Whitesburg. 

Morehead Region — Belfry, Boyd County, Fleming County, 
McKell, Mason County, Paul G. Blazer, Prestonsburg, Rowan 
County, Russell, Virgie. 

TRACK— CLASS AAA BOYS 

Butler Region — Butler. Central, duPont Manual, Flaget, Lou- 
isville Male, Shawnee. 

Atherton Region — Atherton, DeSaJes, Durrett, St. Xavier, 
Southern, Thomas Jefferson. 

Valley Region — ^Bishop David. Fairdale, Iroquois, Pleasure 
Ridge Park, Valley, Western. 

Eastern Region — Eastern, Fern Creek, Seneca, Trinity. 
Waggener, Westport. 



MINUTES OF BOARD MEETING 

The Board of Control of the Kentucky 
High School Athletic Association met at the 
Kentucky Hotel, Louisville, on Saturday 
morning, January 21, 1967. The meeting 
was called to order by President Sherman 
Gish at 9:30, with all Board members, Com- 
missioner Theo. A. Sanford, and Assistant 
Commissioner J. B. Mansfield present. The 
invocation was given by Foster J. Sanders. 

Ralph C. Dorsey moved, seconded by Don 
Davis, that the reading of the minutes of 
the December meeting be waived since mem- 
bers of the Board had received copies of 
these minutes. The motion was carried 
unanimously. 

Oran C. Teater moved, seconded by Fos- 
ter J. Sanders, that the following regula- 
tions concerning the fees for regional bas- 
ketball tournament officials be adopted: The 
official shall receive a fee of $25.00 per 
game and a transportation allowance of 8 
cents per mile for all necessary travel. In 
the event that it is necessary for the official 
to remain overnight at the tournament site, 
he shall be paid an additional $10.00 per 
day for lodging and meals. The motion was 
carried unanimously. 

The Commissioner reported that bids for 
telecasting the final game of the State Bas- 
ketball Tournament would be opened on Feb- 
ruary 4. 

Preston Holland moved, seconded by Fos- 
ter J. Sanders, that all bills of the Associa- 
tion for the period beginning December 1, 
1966, and ending December 31, 1966, be 
alloiwed. The motion was carried unani- 
mously. 

There being no further business, the 
meeting adjourned . 



Paare Four 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR FEBRUARY, 1967 



The Flying Dutchman 

One of Kentucky's outstanding parents just called to 
say that he is quite concerned because the coach of 
t(he team on which his boy plays is a "wild man on 
the bench" and he does not want his boy to act like 
him. The coach in question has a problem. He is one 
of the most personable people the Dutchman has ever 
met, an outstandingly successful coach, but while the 
basketball game is in progress he is a different per- 
sonality. 

The telephone question was, "Where should a parent 
go for a remedy for this situation?" His boy wants to 
play ball, his parents want him to play ball but they 
also don't want to have him graduate from his high 
school a crybaby. Sure, this coach has a problem — aU 
of us have problems, but this Dutchman has never 
yet seen one settled by raving, ranting, or crybabying. 

Relative to the remedy, the first shot should have 
been fired by the assistant principal who was sitting 
next to the complaining parent and who was quite em- 
barrassed by the coach's actions toward the referee, 
which reflected discredit on the school. Maybe he has 
since distinguished himself as an administrator by 
having a Dutch uncle talk with this coach. 

The referee had a problem here also. Here is a 
direct clue from the Flying Dutchman — if the official 
had called a technical foul the first time the coach 
stormed at him, he would have done the coach a fa- 
vor and helped him with his problem— but he didn't. 
If officials don't have the courage to enforce the rules 
thai the proper thing to do is to hang up their whis- 
tles. You are going to ask me now how many techni- 
cal fouls would it take to put this coach or any other 
coach out of the ball game and I am going to say to 
you that if the first act was severe enough the coach 
should be e.xpelled right then. It may be that on the 
second offense the official would disqualify the coach, 
or depending on his actions, maybe three. There is no 
magic number of two like many officials think. The 
courageous referee wiU use judgment and whatever 
his decision is he will be supported by the full strength 
of the Kentucky High School Athletic Association. 

One of Kentucky's outstanding schoolboy athletes, 
now one of the two most publicized players in the 
United States, was highly complimented in a Sunday 
Magazine story which appeared in the LouisviUe Cour- 
ier-Journal on January 19, 1967. From the east coast 
to the west everybody is acclaiming young Westley 
Unseld a miracle man in the field of basketball. The 
praise of his athletic achievements is richly deserved 
and Westley will be acclaimed in sports history along- 
side the names of Wilt "The Stilt" Chamberlain and 
Jerry Lucas. Long after people have forgotten his out- 
standing achievements on the hardwood they wiU re- 
member the praise he gave to his father and mother. 
Westley emphasized that when he had a problem at 
school that he also had a problem with his parents, 
and the young giant said that even now were he to 
get in trouble at the University his mother would 
probably be there to administer the same correction 
he received as a little boy. Kentucky could use thou- 
sands of parents lil<e Mr. and Mrs. Charles Unseld 
because they want a Christian young gentleman first 
and a basketbsdl player second. It behooves aU of us 
who are associated with these young athletes to re- 
member that the first is the most important. 

The Dutchman has to give Bob Mulcahy, young 
Westley's coach at Seneca High School, the credit for 
instiUing the right philosophy in this young player. 

Nobody will ever see this AU American "bellyache" 



or complain. Coach Mulcahy's philosophy is that 
while you are concentrating on quarreling with the 
referee the other team is at the end of the floor scor- 
ing. About this problem of griping, Dick 'VanHoose 
said something to the Dutchman many years ago which 
has served him well. Dick said, "Charlie, whenever 
anybody hands you a lemon, make lemonade from it." 

So you are an official with a problem! Everybody 
has problems but they were never solved by a lack of 
courage or determination to make decisions based on 
right or wrong. The next time you are in Florida take 
a look at the trees. The strong, sturdy upright ones 
are those which are in the open and face the tremen- 
dous wind of the tropical hurricanes, but the weak, 
scrawny ones are found in the valleys where they are 
protected from the winds. The moral here, basketball 
officials, is to always face the wind — never turn your 
back on a problem and hope it wiU go away. 

The Dutchman's admonition to officials is get a 
sense of humor or get out. You can help those coaches 
some if you will. I recall a serious situation at one 
ball game when the coach accused the official of call- 
ing a lousy game and the official replied, "Coach, how 
much did you pay me to officiate this contest?" The 
coach's reply was, "$10." The official then said, "You 
got my $10 game. I have a better one which I work 
for $15 and then I have a dandy for $25. You just hap- 
pened to buy my lousy game." Evei-ybody got a 
laugh and a riot failed to develop because the official 
had a sense of humor. It wouldn't be fun if everything 
went smoothly all the time. Anybody could do the job 
then. 

Spectators have problems which they have to meet. 
I once saw a rabid crowd charge from the stands to 
"get the official" and trample a Utile girl, who has 
never walked normally since that time because the 
crazed mob crippled her. I also saw a young basket- 
baU player who helped the spectators with their prob- 
lem. When the crowd came onto the floor to "get the 
referee" this young man held up his hand and drove 
them back to their seats with one exclamation, "The 
Idds on this Medora team are ashamed of you." Many 
spectators afterwards told the Dutchman that they 
were ashamed because it took a boy to teach them 
proper manners at a basketbaU game. 

We all have problems but the way we separate the 
men from the boys is by observing who meets them 
head-on and who turns and runs. Up in Chicago at the 
head of the National Federation of State High School 
Athletic Association is a "giant of a man." Cliff 
Fagan, in my book, towers above the other giants be- 
cause he has a philosophy of Ufe and sports which 
is unexceUed. He had the courage to try new ideas 
and make tough decisions but most of all he knows 
how to handle men. This Dutchman wUl never forget 
a chat with CUff in the lobby of the Brown Hotel back 
in 1962 when the Dutchman was crybabying about 
something. After Ustening to Qiff nobody has ever seen 
this Dutchman shed a tear smce. That is why this col- 
umn about problems is being written to emphasize 
maturmg from childhood to manhood. 

So, it is basketbaU tournament time in Kentucky and 
once again there is no question that Kentucky wUl 
demonstrate again that it is worthy of its title, "The 
Sportsmanship Capital of the Nation." Problems we 
have but problems we can solve. The state tournament 
hospitaUty committee will be headed this year by my 
good friend, Lou Benn, who has been appointed by the 
LouisviUe Chamber of Commerce to make all of you 
Kentuckicms feel wanted and at home in the big city. 
Your questions relative to the hospitality program 
(Continued on Page Eleven) 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR FEBRUARY, 1967 



Football Officials' Ratings On Sportsmanship Of 
K.H.S.A.A. Member Schools — 1966 



Page Five 



SCHOOL 



Anderson County 

Atherton 

Austin Tracy 

Bardstown 

Bath County 

Beechwood 

Belfry 

Bell County 

Bellevue 

Berea 

Bishop David 

Boone County 

Bourbon County 

Bowling Green 

Boyd County 

Boyle County 

Breckinridge County 

Bryan Station 

Burgin 

Butler 

Butler County 

Caldwell County 

Campbell County 

Campbellsville 

Carroll County 

Catlettsburg 

Caverna 

Central 

Christian County 

Corbin 

Crittenden County 

Cumberland 

Cumberland County 

Danville 

Daviess County 

Dayton 

De Sales 

Dixie Heights 

Dunbar 

duPont Manual 

Durrett 

Eastern 

Elizabethtown 

Elkhorn City 

Eminence 

Evarts 

Fairdale 

Falmouth 

Fern Creek 

Flaget 

Fleming County 

Fleming-Neon 

Fort Campbell 

Fort Knox 

Frankfort 

Franklin County 

Franklin Simpson 

Fulton 

Fulton County 

Gamaliel 

Garrard County 

George Rogers Clark 

Georgetown 

Glasgow 

Greensburg 

Harlan 

Harrison County 

Harrodsburg 

Hazard 

Hazel Green 

Henderson 

Henderson County 

Henry Clay 

Henry County 

Highlands 

Hiseville 

Holmes 

Hopkinsville 

Iroquois 

Irvine 

James A. Cawood 

Jenkins 

Jessamine County 

Johns Creek 

Kentucky Military Institute __ 
Kentucky School for the Deaf 

Knox Central 

Lafayette 

LaRue County 

Lebanon 



E 

22 

31 

13 
29 
30 

19 
35 
25 
37 
10 
27 
33 
30 
29 
31 
26 
10 
29 
10 
28 
14 
21 
24 
34 
16 
33 
24 
11 
24 
27 
26 
33 
15 
29 
22 
37 
33 
31 
14 
40 
34 
25 
33 
31 
17 
32 
34 
25 
30 
23 
30 
26 
31 
37 
27 
27 
21 
21 

7 
11 
22 
32 
27 
34 
28 
33 
34 
26 I 
33 I 
22 I 
30 I 
25 
45 
21 
34 
20 
23 
38 
31 
28 
24 
41 
19 
28 
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12 
22 
18 
25 
31 



COACH 
G F 



4 

4 

4 
14 I 

3 

1 

2 

4 
11 

4 

8 

7 

5 

9 

4 

8 

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2 

3 

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5 

7 

3 

3 
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10 

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1 

1 

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3 





1 

6 

1 

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2 







3 



1 



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3 

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2 

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4 

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OTHER SCHOOL 

OFFICIALS 
E G F 



22 
32 
16 
35 
29 
23 
36 
26 
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13 
29 
37 
36 
34 
34 
29 
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34 
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36 
26 
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30 
31 
28 
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32 
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26 
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28 


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47 





7 


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29 


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24 


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26 





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10 

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5 
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11 
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6 
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5 
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21 
3 
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17 
5 
3 
7 

2 
4 

10 
8 

10 
3 
4 
9 

12 

14 
6 
3 

12 

6 
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20 
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20 
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16 
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21 
15 
24 
20 
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28 
24 
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35 
29 
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39 
34 
28 
31 
26 
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33 
29 
25 
31 
24 
31 
27 
31 
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28 
30 
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20 
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13 
23 
30 
23 
33 
26 
31 
34 
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30 
20 
25 
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20 
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18 
27 
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CROWD 
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24 I 
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Pat;e Six 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR FEBRUARY, 1967 



Leslie County 

Lily 

Lloyd 

London 

Louisa . 

Louisville Country iDay 

Louisville Male 

Ludlow 

Lynch 

Lynn Camp 

McKell 

Madison 

Madison Central 

Madison ville 

Mayfield 

M. C. Napier 

Meade County 

Meixer County 

Metcalfe County 

Middlesboro 

Millersburg Military Institute 

Montgomery County 

Morgan County 

Mt. Sterling 

Mt. Vernon 

Murray 

Newport 

Newport Catholic 

Nicholas County 

North Hardin 

North Marshall 

North Warren 

Ohio County 

Old Kentucky Home 

Oldham County 

Owen County 

Owensboro 

Owensboro Catholic 

Paducah Tilghman 

Paintsville 

Paris 

Park City 

Paul G. Blazer 

Pikeville 

Pineville 

Pleasure Ridge Park 

Prestonsburg 

Raceland 

Rowan County 

Russell 

Russellville 

St. Joseph 

St. Xavier 

Say re 

Scott County 

Seneca 

Shawnee 

Shelby County 

Shelbyville 

Shepherdsville 

Simon Kenton 

Somerset 

Southern 

Stanford 

Tates Creek 

Temple Hill 

Thomas Jefferson 

Tompkins ville 

Trigg County 

Trinity 

Union County 

Valley 

Waggener 

Warren County 

Washington County 

Western 

Westport 

Wheelwright 

Whitesburg 

Whitley County 

Williamsburg 

Woodford County 

Wurtland 



27 


1 8 





1 


31 


23 


3 


1 


1 1 


23 


a? 


8 








38 


2S 


2 


2 


1 3 


27 


24 


5 


7 


1 


32 


23 


6 








23 


27 


14 








36 


31 


6 


1 





32 


28 


1 


1 





30 


16 


7 








19 


28 


6 


2 





30 


17 


10 


4 


5 


27 


21 


16 








27 


21 


2 








20 


27 


1 


1 





28 


31 


1 





1 


33 


31 


10 








32 


22 


4 








24 


25 


3 








25 


21 


8 








25 


40 


2 


1 





40 


8 


5 








11 


24 


8 


1 





26 


22 


14 


2 


2 


32 


16 


2 








17 


34 


2 








35 


29 


8 


1 





31 


22 


17 


1 





20 


27 


9 


2 


1 


26 


41 


6 








39 


5 











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Schools' Ratings On 
Football Officials 

The following ratings were received on football offi- 
ciah registered with the K.H.S.A.A. during 1956-1967. 
The numbers following each name represent respec- 
tively the number of Excellent, Good, Fair, and Poor 
ratings given to the official. 



Adams, Calvin K., 2-2-2-0; Adams, Charles David, 
1-1-1-0; Albright, James R., 2-7-0-0; Allison, Roy, 
1-1-0-1; Anders, Raleigh A.. 6-10-8-0; Argo, Charles, 
1-3-0-0; Atkinson, Charlie, 4-6-2-0; 

Ballaban, Thomas, 1-0-0-0; Barlow, Bill, 1-1-0-0; Bar- 
tels. John, 4-7-1-0; Battisti, Edward A., 1-2-2-1; Beck, 
C. Norman, 6-8-1-2; Beheler, Donald S.. 4-4-0-0; Bell, 
Clarence T., 0-2-0-0; Bennett, Howard, .5-1-0-0; Ben- 
zinger, Joseph, 7-1-1-0; Bero, James J., 1-2-0-0; Bivliis, 
George W., 5-3-0-0: Blackburn, Adrian, -V2-0-0; Black- 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR FEBRUARY, 1967 



Page Seven 



bum, Tennyson R., 1-2-0-1; Blanton, Homer, 3-5-1-0; 
Boeh, BUI, 3-2-0-0; Boemker, Bob, 3-7-0-0; Bolte, Fritz, 
0-2-0-0; Bond, Jack C, 4-0-0-0; Bordy, Philip, 2-5-0-0; 
Bostic, Tim, 1-0-1-0; Bostick, Lord M., Jr., 10-2-0-0; 
Bowman, Earl G., 1-8-0-0; Boyles, Jerry F., 3-3-1-1; 
Bradley, Delano R., 0-1-1-fl; Brashiear, Loy Ray, 1-0-0-0; 
Brizendine, Vic, 9-13-1-2; Brock, John H., 14-1-0; 
Brotzge, Maurice J., 15-9-2-0; Brown, Bill, 0-13-1-1; 
Brown, Herman G., 2-9-0-0; Brown, J. W., 7-0-0-0; Bul- 
lock, Edmund, 4-2-1-0; Burke, Daniel F., 24-1-0; Burke, 
David Dean, 2-2-0-1; Burke, Harry, 8-8-1-0; Burkhart, 
James G., 7-2-3-0; Burton, James Edward, 5-3-0-0; Bur- 
ton, John, 4-9-3-0; Byars, Michael Kirk, 0-2-0-0; 

Cain, Paul D., 2-1-0-0; Canaday, Jacy Glenn, 1-0-2-0; 
Canady, Ray Blair, 6-84-0; Cannon, Jerry, 1-0-0-0; Can- 
ter, John, 4-3-4-1; Carlberg, John H., 3-2-0-0; Carlson, 
David A., 4-4-2-1; Carr, Virgil Lee, 0-0-1-0; CarroU, 
Jerry R., 1-0-0-0; Carver, Arthur E., 0-2-0-0; Cassell, 
David F., 1-3-0-0; Cecil, A. Morris, 3-6-0-0; Chinn, 
Ralph, 3-2-0-0; Cisco, Robert N., 4-7-1-0; Clark. Charles 
L., 1-2-3-1; Clark, Owen B., 3-7-1-1; Clemmons, Sam, 
1-3-0-0; Clusky, Joe, 3-2-0-0; Cochran, Roy H., Jr., 
0-1-0-0; Collins. C. E., 54-2-0; ColUns, .Jack, .3-2-0-0; 
Cook, Richard N., 2-7-0-0; Cowan, Robert L., 0-2-0-0; 
Grace, James E., 2-0-0-0; Craft, Albert B., 2-9-0-1; 
Craft, Bill, 5-4-1-2; Cullen, Charles E., .3-4-0-0; Cullum, 
Harold D., 0-3-0-0; Gulp, Willard E., 5-5-0-0; Curnutte, 
James R., 3-2-0-0; Current, Ellis Ray, 7-5-0-1; 

Dallman, James W., 2-3-0-1; Damron, Walter Louis, 
0-3-0-0; Davis, Clyde E., 3-1-14; Davis, Curt, 6-13-4-1; 
Davis, Ralph C, 2-14-0; Deaton, Daniel E., 2-1-0-0; 
DeMuth, Paul E., 6-5-2-0; Dennedy, T. Robert, 1-1-0-0; 
Dent, Donald L., 1-9-1-1; Denton, Charles, 9-64-1; Den- 
ton, William J., 5-5-0-0; Dial, Charles R., 1-0-1-0; Dial, 
Jack W., 6-2-0-0; Dixie, Cornelius P.. 14-1-0; Dizney, 
Alan, 0-1-1-0; Doll, Louis E., 0-3-0-0; Donald, Edward 
W., 3-6-0-0; Dorsey, James, 3-2-0-0; Dosek, Jerome J., 
2-3-0-0; Douthwaite, Donald D., 1-0-0-0; Downey, Rob- 
ert F., 2-1-0-0; Drake, Richard R.. 640-2-0; Draud, Jon 
E., 2-1-24; Duff, Eari, 10-3-04; Duncan, Paul H., 
0-2-0-0; Durkin, Jack D., 3-3-1-0; 

Edwards, Sonny, 1-0-0-0; Elliott, Carroll L., 2-10-1-0; 
Elliott, Lamoin, 1-1-0-0; Ellis, Johnny, 4-5-0-0; Elowtz, 
Cart, 644-0; Ernest, Edward R., 2-5-2-0; 

Fallon, Robert James, 9-1-2-1; Fandrich, William, 
9-0-0-1; Farina, Lawrence, 0-1-0-0; Farish, M(;rlin J., 
1-0-0-0; Faust, Jack, 4-8-24; Fenimore, Clarke E., 
0-11-2-1; Ferguson, Jesse S., 2-3-0-0; Ferguson, Thonias 
L., 2-2-0-0; Fey, Ailen, 3-11-1-2; Fields, Ronald M.. 
4-5-2-2; Fish, Leland G., 1-3-0-0; Fletcher, John L.. 
1-0-1-0; Florence, Robert H., 54-2-2; Flynn, Bobby, 
2-7-2-fl; Forbes, J. W., 2-2-3-0; Fortney, Robert L. 
3-7-6-1; Foster, Berryman E., 6-0-0-0; Foster, J. W., 
2-7-1-0; Fraley, Bill, 4-7-0-0; Frankel, Louis S., 1-9-04; 
Franklin, James A., 5-3-0-0; Freese, OUie, 0-0-1-0; 
Fruit, William E., 0-6-04; Fryrear, William P., 1-8-1-0; 
Fucci, Dominic A., 1044-0; Fuller, Wilton Hope, 
2-1-0-1; Funkhouser, Roy A., 04-O-0; 

Galuk, Walter M., 2-7-04; Garrett, Riohard A., 
2-844; Gentry, Dale J., 1-12-0-0; Gettler, John F., 
124-1-0; Gilbert, Gerald L., 4-9-1-0; Gilligan, Jack, 
0-2-0-0; Golden, Billy Joe, 14-1-14; Gorham, Harry C. 
24-0-0; Gour, Bob, 8-4-3-0; Grace, Charles K., 5-6-1-0; 
Grace, H. E., Jr., 0-3-24; Graham, James E.. 1-6-1-0; 
Greene, Therman R., 0-1-0-0; Greenoe, Richard H., 
1-0-0-0; Gresham, R. P., 1-0-0-0; Griffith, Lauren, 
2-5-0-0; Griggs, John M., 8-5-0-0; Guess, James E.. 
04-14; 

Hadden, Newell P., Jr., 3-11-0-0; Hagan, .Joe "Red", 
4-134-1; Hagerman Bart, 1-5-0-1; Hagy, Harold J., 
2-1-0-0; HaU, Charies E., 0-1-0-0; Hall, John R.. 1-2-14; 
HaU, Richard T., 1-5-1-2; Hammock. Don L., 1-2-01; 



Hanes, Edward C, 8-5-0-0; Hanlon, Pat, 1-1-0-0; Har- 
ding, Artell, 1-1-0-0; Harris, Gene, 0-1-0-0; Harris, Jer- 
ry, 5-044; Hams, Russell, 3-6-2-1; Hatfield, Gene Ed- 
win, 24-0-0; Hawkins, Will A., 3-3-0-1; Hedge, David 
William, 2-5-1-0; Heinichen, Carl, 14-0-0; Heinold, F. 
Thomas, 2-0-1-0; Heinze, Frank, 14-6-14; Heinze, John 
G., 14-5-24; Hellard, George D., 1-04-0; Helvey, O. J., 
0-14-0; Hendon, L. J., 9-0-0-0; Hershberger, Richard 
W., 2-14-0; Hildebrandt, Glen M., 0-0-0-2; Hill, Earl F., 
10-15-1-0; Hofstetter, Joe, 2-0-1-1; Holbrook, William H., 
04-0-0; Holbrook, William M., 2-3-0-0; Holland, David 
W. 4-3-14; Hollingsworth, Ralph D., 3-2-14: Hobnail, 
g. T., 0-8-4-1; Holton, Glenn H., 0-1-0-0; Hubcr. Carl W., 
3-9-3-0; Hughes, Paul P., 64-0-0; Hughes, Robert E., 
12-3-1-0; Huston, Roderick J., 0-2-1-0; HjTison, Fred R., 
3-64-0; 

Idol, Billy Joe, 3404-3; Idol, Lloyd, Jr., .3-0-0-0; In- 
gram, William R., 0-1-0-0; Ishmael, Stephen A., 4-1-1-1; 

Jacoby, Ben W., 0-3-0-0; Jajnes, Gene, 2-0-2-0; Jar- 
i-ell, Frank W., 2-1-1-0; Jenkins, Kean, 4-9-0-0; Johns, 
Charles, 1-3-0-0; .Johns, Joseph O., 1-0-04; Johnson, 
Bernard, 1-0-0-0; Johnson. Harry A., Jr.. 3-1-14; John- 
son, Robert L., 2-0-0-0; Johnson, .Stan W., 5-7-3-0; 
Jones, J. Carl. 10-3-3-0; Jones, John H., 3-3-1-1; Jones, 
Paul, 14-0-0; Jones, William A., 1-3-1-3; Junker, Edwin 
G., 04-0-0; 

Kallaher, Jim, 1-2-1-0; Karr, Don. 1-3-2-0; Kathman, 
Bernie, 24-1-0; Kauffman, Victor C, 0-3-0-0; Kaufman, 
\l\in R., 2-8-1-0; Kelly. William G.. 1-3-1-0; Kemper, 
Russ, 64-0-0; Kennedy, Philip, 1-0-0-0; Kerr, Kenneth, 
(-6-2-0; Kinmiel, Bill R., 3-3-0-0; King, Allen V., 34-1-2; 
Kirk, Floyd Charles, 7-5-3-0; Kraft, H. Nellis, 7-5-04; 
Kratzenberg, Ralph, 1-0-1-0; 

Lally, James J., 24-0-0; Lambert. In-in. 9-8-2-0; Lan- 
ders, John F., 9-.3-2-0; Lange, William E.. Jr., 5-11-0-0; 
Lawson, Leland. 5-1-1-0; Leahy, Pat, 3-7-0-0; Ledbetter, 
Paul M., 2-5-1-0; Lehkamp, Kenneth H., 2-.5-2-0; Lena- 
han, Thomas F., 511-0-0; Liber, James, 3-3-0-0; Lindon, 
Bobby Glenn, 10-5-0-0; Lingo, Henry E., 1-14-0; Logan, 
Eli, 84-04; Long, James E., 1-.3-0-0; Lopp, Wilbur H., 
.Ir., 04-0-0; Lotz, Robert W., 3-6-0-0; Lowe, Gene, 
9-14-24; Lowe. Stan, 11-2-0-0: Lushy, George, 0-9-1-2; 

McCarthy, William J., 14-0-0; McConachie, Bud. 
0-5-2-0; McCormick. Donald R., 2-3-1-2; Mc-Cowan, Con- 
iiell, 1-6-6-0; McDougal, Alf, 0-1-0-0; McFadden, Jim- 
mie, 3-7-24; McGehee, Gordon, 114-0-1; McGlasson, 
Eugene M., l-,5-l-0; McKenzie, Robert L.. M-2-0; Mc- 
Kinnev, Adelle F,, 4-3-1-0; McLane, Albert, 1-5-2-0; Mc- 
Lemore, Jack, 4-1-0-0; McNamee, Jack, 9-3-1-0; Mc- 
Peek, Talmadge, 6-744; McSheffrey, J. E., 1-1-04; 

Madon. Robert L., 1-2-2-0; Magruder, Earl. 1-4-0-2; 
Vlalone, James F., 0-6-3-1: Marcum, Bruce, 1-1-0-0; 
Mattingly, Charles, .3-5-2-0; May, E. B., 15-5-3-0; May- 
hew, William M., 2-12-0-O; Ma.ynard, Joe E., 7-1-0-0; 
Mays, Raymond K.. 0-1-2-0; Mayo, Heni'y L., Jr., 
2-2-0-0; Meeks. Jack, 44-2-0; Meknige, James, Jr., 
44-04; Mercke, Frank R., 242-0-0; Mercker, George 
E., 9-2-0-1; Metcalf, Ken, 0-3-0-0; Metzger, Donald R., 
3-2-0-1; Mickey, Elbert W., 1-2-0-0; Miller, Maurice 
Tony, 0-04-0; Millerhaus, Bill, 2-2-2-0; Minta, John H., 
5-2-3-0; Mitchell, Vyron W., 2-5-0-0; IVIitchell, Emmett. 
2-7-0-0; Moody, William R., 5-2-0-1; Mooneyhan, James 
H., 10-5-1-0; Moore, James Patrick, 2-24-0; Mordica, 
William A., 3-24-0; Morgan, Jinimie Lee, I-O-O-O; Mor- 
2;an, Richard. 2-4-3-0; Morris, Gene L., 3-2-1-0; Morris- 
sey, Rockne, 5-5-0-0; Morse, Richard K., 9-5-2-0; Moss, 
How^ard A., 6-4-0-0; Mueller, Dick, 5-2-0-1; Mullins, 
B. E., 0-0-1-2; Mullins, Robert M., 0-0-1-0: Vluntan, Pe- 
ter J., 94-3-1; Murrav, Thomas, 9-6-0-1; 

Nassida, Fra;ik R., 1-7-0-0; Neal, Gene, 10-10-01; 
Mevil, Vernon E., 2-3-0-0; NickeU, Duane, 5-3-0-1; 
Vidav, Paul D.. 1-0-0 0; Noland, Douglas, 6-5-11; Nord, 



i 



Page Eight 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR FEBRUARY, 1967 



Bertrand J., 4-10-1-2; Nord, Ed, 10-10-3-1; Nord, Gil- 
bert, 4-12-2-1: Norwood, Thomas R., 9-7-0-0; 

Odil, William Randall, 2-1-3-0; Oldham, Ben Rich- 
ard. 1-10-0-1; Omer, BiUy W., 7-3-1-3; Omer, Harold 
G., 4-4-3-0; O'Nan, Norman, 8-2-0-1; O'Neal, Bud, 
2-6-1-0; Orem, Dale Linton, 4-6-0-0; Osborne, Ted G., 
5-6-1-0; Osmer, Thomas Mitchell. 0-1-0-0; Overby, 
H. E., 4-4-0-0; 

Pace, Donald, 2-7-2-1; Palmer, Carl A., 0-1-1-0; Park- 
er, Bob L., 3-3-1-1; Parsley, Clyde E., 7-7-2-0; Pate, 
Uoyd W., 8-1-0-0; Paull<, John R., 5-0-0-0; Peecher, W. 
Uoyd, 1-0-1-0; Peeno, Harry R., 10-5-1-0; Pegausch, 
William E., 1-5-0-1; PeUiam, Pete, 0-2-0-0; Perry, Tom, 
5-3-0-0; Pietrowski, Paul, 0-4-7-0; Pinson, Eugene, 
5-1-0-0; Plate, Arthur C, 0-2-0-0; Porco, Kenneth J., 
3-9-0-0; Porter, Charles E., 1-4-0-0; Powell, Logan G., 
3-10-1-0; Prather, Wilbur E., 7-10-2-1; 

Ransbottom. Jack, 0-2-0-0; Rapp, WiUiam C, 1-1-2-0; 
Raque, Ronald. 1-6-0-0; Rawls, L. Townes, 3-6-1-0; Ray, 
Bob, 6-3-1-0; Ray, Shirley G., 3-4-2-0; Reddington, Jim, 
4-17-0-0; Reece, Fred, 6-5-2-0; Reece, Jerry T., 9-3-0-0; 
Reed, Gordon, 6-8-0-0; Renfro, John, 0-2-2-2; Richard- 
son, Dennis C. Jr., 0-1-0-0; Rieman, Robert S., 6-<S-0-0; 
Riggins, Jason M., 1-0-1-1; Riggs, William Tom, 8-4-0-0; 
Ring, Bill, 2-3-2-0; Roberts, John G., 2-0-3-0; Robinson, 
Don L.. 6-1-1-0; Robinson, J. Ward, 0-2-1-0; Rodgers, 
H. Tom, 3-3-0-0; Rolph, Harold J., 0-1-1-0; Roof, Jerry 
C. 3-6-0-0; Rudolph. Fred, Jr., 3-7-0-0; Russell, Gary 
E., 7-10-0-1; Russell. Joe. 9-2-0-0; Russman, Godfrey 
F., 4-6-2-0; 

Sacra. Gresham. 4-5-2-0; Sagers, Robert M., 1-5-0-0; 
Sainoya. Frank B.. 0-1-1-0; Sanders, Mel, 5-4-1-0; Sapp, 
Edward, 2-7-2-0; Schad, Jim, 0-1-0-0; Schlich, Paul, 
0-7-2-2; Schlosser, J. Paul, 0-1-0-0; Schmitt, Paul E., 
3-11-0-9; Schrecker. Dennis R., 10-5-3-0; Schuble, 
Charles E., 7^-0-0; Schwetschenau, Paul, 3-2-2-0; Scott 
W. L,. 7-5-2-0; Scale. W. E., 3-6-0-1; Seavers, Joseph 
E.. 3-3-0-0; Selvy. Curt, 15-7-2-0; Shanks, Thomas E., 
5-7-0-1; Shaw, Earl, 0-1-0-0; Shaw, John H., 4-0-0-0; 
Shewmaker, Wayne. 5-1-0-0; Shirley, Michael D., Jr., 
0-2-0-0; Showalter. John, 2-7-2-1; Sloan, Wallace 
7-13-2-0; Slone, Earl Dean, 0-2-0-0; Snyder, Gus, 5-4-0-2; 
Spath. William J., 1-0-0-0; Speck, Michael E., 04-0-0; 
Staley, E. G., 2-10-1-0; Staples, Jerry, 1-0-0-0; Staten, 
Joseph B.. 2-2-0-0; Stephens, Herbert D., 2-1-1-0; Ste- 
vens, William D., 3-11-2-0; Stephenson, Harry S., 
8-1-1-0; Strain, Richard P., 10-6-2-0; Strong Amett 
11-2-0-1; Sucietto, Dick, 4-8-0-0; SuUivan, A. G.', 0-11-2-0;' 
Sullivan, Don Chris, 6-6-0-0; Sullivan, Thomas E 
1-3-1-1; Swinford, John, 3-2-1-0; 

Tackett, Jay, 4-6-1-1; Talbot, WiUiam G., 6-3-0-0; 
Taylor, Dennis H., 7-0-0-0; Tehan, James, 1-0-1-1; 
Thomas, Charies, 1-5-0-0; Thomas, Raymond E., 
7-4-2-5; Thompson, Jack, 7-8-0-0; Thompson, Jack F., 
Jr., 7-7-0-0; Thompson, Ralph, 0-1-0-0; Thompson, 
Thomas D., 6-7-0-0; Thrasher, Phillip, 0-8-0-0; Timmer- 
mg, George E., 74-0-0; Trautwein, Jim, 4-6-3-1; Treas 
Joe W., 1-1-0-0; Treibly, Charles E., 0-2-0-0; Trimer 
Norman E., 0-2-0-0; Trunzo, N. P., 1-8-1-1; Turley' 
Bernard L., l-O-O-O; Tussey, George, Jr 4-1-0-2- 

Usery, L. L., 1-1-0-0; 

VanHoose, Jack D., 1-2-1-0; Vankirk, Alvia S., 0-7-1-0 
VanMeter, David G., 2-15-0-0; Van Zant, Jim, 3-0-0-1 
Vaughan, John T., 1-2-0-0; Vaughan, Richard, 04-0-0 
Vennell, Robert H., 1-2-0-0; Vmciguerra, Phillip, 4-1-0-0 
Vinson, Casie, 0-2-0-0; Visscher, Robert W., 0-1-2-0; 

Wagner, Jim, 3-5-0-2; Waide, Harry D., 3-5-0-0; Walk- 
er, Julian R., 5-5-0-0; Walker, Paul R., 5-5-0-0; Waller, 
Bobbie E., 2-12-1-0; Wanchic, Nicholas, 11-6-1-0; War- 
ren, Buist Buzz, 0-2-0-0; Warren, Ken, 1-11-34; War- 
ren, Paul J., 0-3-0-0; Wahaleski, Thomas V., 2-7-2-1; 
Washer, James P., 0-4-0-0; Washer, Robert Stanley, 



4-5-0-1; Watkins, James, 0-1-0-0; Watts, Shirley R., 
16-6-0-0; Weaver, Clyde Ivan, 1-1-0-0; Webb, Dudley, 
44-0-0; Welch, BiU, 3-1-1-0; Welch, J. D., 3-3-0-0; 
Welch. Robert J., 0-1-1-0; Werkowitz, Jack, 1-5-0-0; 
White, James, 12-5-1-0; Wickham, James Robert, 
1-0-0-0; Willey, Harold L., 3-1-0-0; Williams, Bert O., 
0-0-1-0; Williams, James H., 2-2-0-0; Willis, Donald A., 
4-2-0-0; Willis, Jim, 1-0-0-0; Wilson, John Pope, 0-2-1-1; 
WUson, Louis O., 7-7-0-0; Wise, BiUy V., 14-9-1-0; Wise, 
Jack, 15-5-0-1; Womack, William H., 2-8-2-1; Wray, 
Robert F.. 13-6-0-0; Wright, James Uoyd, 0-2-0-0; 
Wurtz, Emil, 0-2-0-0; Wyatt, William Jack, 3-1-0-0; 

Young, Jack T., 3-0-1-1; 

Zaranka, Benny J., 2-7-0-0; Zehner, Albert, 044-3; 
Zimmer, Tom, 11-3-1-2. 



FILMS 



(Continued from January Issue) 

The films listed below are in the Film Library of the Uni- 
Tersity of Kentnclcy College of Education. The rental prices 
shown do not apply to schools which nse one of the special 
subscriptions service plans, offered by the Bureau of Audio- 
Visual Materials. 

Baseball 

TOUCHING ALL BASES, j-s-c-a, 4 reels, $1.00 

This film is intended to teach youngstei's baseball by 
showing various American League stars playing their 
positions. It is also intended to give fans as a whole a 
better understanding and knowledge of the national 
pastime. The film shows Father Flanagan and his 
Boys Town Team, the Hall of Fame ceremonies in 
Cooperstown, New York, and scenes from night base- 
ball games. 
THE UMPIRE IN BASEBALL, e-j-s-c-a, 2 reels, $1.00 

Summarizes importance of the umpire to the base- 
ball game. Explanation of the duties of the umpire 
and also qualifications for job, showing where they 
receive their training. 
WORLD SERIES OF 1954, e-j-s-c-a, 3 reels, $1.00 

Highlights of the game between the Cleveland Indi- 
ans and the New York Giants are shown in this film. 
The Giants, sparked by the sensational hitting of 
Rhodes, defeated the Indians in four straight games. 
The Indians had set a record for the number of games 
won in winning the American League Pennant. 
WORLD SERIES OF 1955, e-j-s-c-a, 4 reels, color, 
$1.00 

Brooklyn Dodgers and the New York Yankees are 
shown in this film. The commentary leading up to 
each game makes the film interesting as the Dodgers 
win the world championship. 
WORLD SERIES OF 1957, e-j-s-c-a, 4 reels, $1.00 

The American League champion New York Yankees, 
carry the series the full seven games before bowing 
to the Milwaukee Braves, champion of the National 
League. The film catches most of the hitting and 
shows the plays in which runs were scored in each 
game. The narrator. Lew Fonseca, describes the 
play and fills in the background with interesting bits 
of information concerning the game. 
WORLD SERIES OF 1959, e-j-s-c-a, 4 reels, color, 
$1.00 

The highlights of the six games played in the series 
between the Los Angeles Dodgers and the Chicago 
White Sox are shown in this film. The Dodgers won 
the series by defeating the White Sox four games to 
two. Most of the scoring plays are filmed, along with 
many of the outstanding defensive plays. The color 
that goes with these games is captured in the film. 
WORLD SERIES OF 1960, e-j-s-c-a, 4 reels (44 Mm.), 
color, $1.00 

Exciting moments of the seven games between the 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR FEBRUARY, 1967 



Page Nine 



New York Yankees of the American League carried 
the series its full seven games before bowing to Na- 
tional League Pittsburgh Bucs. Highlights of all seven 
games are shown and the action described. 
WORIX) SERIES OF 1981, e-j-s-c-a, 4 reels (44 Min.), 
color, $1.00 

Narrated by Mel Allen, this film shows the Cincin- 
nati Reds were able to win only the second game in 
the series against the New York Yankees. Superb 
pitching of Whitey Ford and batting power of the 
Yankees brought them the world's championship after 
five games. 
WORLD SERIES OF 1962, j-s-c-a, 4 reels, color, $1.00 

Key plays from all seven games are shown as the 
New York Yankees of the American League retain the 
world's championship by defeating the San Francisco 
Giants by the score of 1-0 in the final game. 
WORLD SERIES OF 1963, j-s-c-a, 4 reels (44 Min.), 
color, $1.00 

Shows higMigiits of games in which the Los Angeles 
Dodgers won the baseball championship by defeating 
the New York Yankees in four straight games. 
WORLD SERIES OF 1984, j-s-c-a, 4 reels (44 Min.), 
color, $1.00 

The St. Louis Cardinals topped the New York Yan- 
■kees in the first game, 9-5, and went on to win the 
series to become the world's champions for 1965. Cov- 
ers all the exciting plays in the games. 
WORLD SERIES OF 1965, e-j-s-c-a, 4 reels, color, 
$1.00 

Shows highlights of the games in which the Minne- 
sota Twins take the first two games at Minneapolis 
from Los Angeles and the Etodgers come back to win 
the next four games with Sandy Koufax pitching the 
seventh game for the world's championship. (KHSAA) 



Basketball Questions 

(Continued From Page One) 

Ruling: The goal counts if made and the foul is 
penalized as any foul during a live ball. The period 
does not end until after the free throw has been ad- 
ministered. 

35. Play: Jumper Al taps the ball so that it goes in 
flight outside the restraining circle where, before it 
has been touched by any non-jumper, Al taps it again 
so that it strikes the floor 10 feet away. Al then picks 
up the ball with both hands and dribbles in for a goal. 

Ruling: Legal. The jump did not end until the baU 
struck the floor. Al is permitted to dribble thereafter. 

36. Play: After a successful free throw by HI, Al 
makes a legal throw-in to A2. The official neglects to 
signal time-in and the timer fails to start the clock. 
A2 scores a field goal. 

Ruling: The field goal counts. The ball became alive 
when it touched A2 inbounds. It, therefore, was a live 
ball that went into the basket even though the official 
and the timer failed to start the clock. 

37. Play: Al is holding the ball but has not dribbled. 
He places the ball on the floor in front of him and 
straightens to an upright position. He then reaches 
down to the floor and picks up the ball. 

Ruling: This is legal. However, if he dribbles, he will 
be violating. 

38. Play: Al, who is at the free throw line, has the 
ball and is making preparations for a free throw at- 
tempt when A2 pushes Bl along the lane. 

Ruling: A2 has committed a personal foul inter- 
preted in this situation to be intentional. Bl is award- 
ed two free throws after which the ball will be put in 
play by a center jump. 

Comment: This situation is interpreted to be an in- 
tentional foul, in order to prevent team A from exploit- 



ing the rule. By committing a player control foul, A2 
causes it to be a false double foul, resulting in a cen- 
ter jump, thereby depriving team B of its opportunity 
for a throw-in if the free throw by Al were suc- 
cessful, or depriving team B of an opportunity 
to secure the ball if the free throw attempt by Al 
were missed. But v.'hen the foul by A2 is considered 
intentional, team B is given two free throws, which 
makes the infraction by team A costly. 

39. Play: While the two teams are warming up five 
minutes before the game time, Al and Bl trade pimch- 
es at mid-court. 

Ruling: The official's jurisdiction in such a situation 
begins 10 minutes before the ball is tossed at center to 
start the game. Both Al and Bl are disqualified from 
competing in the contest and each team is awai-ded 
two free throws for the flagrant technical foul commit- 
ted against its player. After the four free throws have 
been administered, the game will continue with a 
jump in the center circle between any two opponents. 

40. Play: Al is holding the ball in his front court 
near a corner made by the junction of the end and 
side lines. A2 has a position in the front court near 
that end line. B2 has taken a legal position between 
A2 and the basket and is closely guarding A2. To 
avoid B2, A2 goes out of bounds over the end line and 
returns to the court under the basket where he re- 
ceives the pass from teammate Al. 

Ruling: This is a technical foul on :\2 for leaving 
the court for an unauthorized reason. A player may 
not leave the court to evade his guard. 

41. Play: Al and Bl strike each other with their fists 
during a dead ball. Immediately after the fight, B2 
curses the official. 

Ruling: Each foul is technical and flagrant. This is 
a false double foul. Two technical fouls are assessed 
against team B and one against team A. Al, Bl, cuid 
B2 are immediately disqualified from the game. Any 
player of team A, including an incoming player, may 
attempt the four free throws awarded it and any team 
B player, including an incoming player, may attempt 
the two free throws awarded team B. After the free 
throws are administered play is resumed by a jump 
ball in the center circle between any two opponents. 

42. Play: Field goal try by Al goes into the basket 
and is below the ring level. However, it bounces out 
the top of the basket when the ball strikes the inside 
of tile net. 

Ruling: No goal has been scored and the ball con- 
tinues in play. 

43. Play: The clock, which is stopped, indicates 2 
seconds remain before the third quarter ends. Bl 
misses a free throw and A2 obtains the rebound and 
misses a field goal try. Bl secures the rebound and 
dribbles down court across the division line well into 
his front court before he charges into A3 just as the 
horn sounds. The referee consults the timer, who ac- 
knowledges he did not start the clock when Al missed 
the free throw. 

Ruling: If the referee is positive that, had the timer 
started the clock at the proper instant, time would 
have expired before Bl charged into A3, he would rule 
that the quarter had expired before the contact and the 
foul would be ignored unless it is unsportsmanlike. 

44. Play: Al, in the mid-court area and legally 
guarded by Bl, consumes more than 5 seconds in a 
bona fide attempt to advance the ball by dribbling. 

Ruling: There is no violation. The official wiU not 
begin a 5-second count when the dribbler is clearly 
making an honest endeavor to advance the ball. 

45. Play: While an unsuccessful fi'ee throw by Al is 



Page Ten 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR FEBRUARY, 1967 



in flight, Bl enters the lane too soon. Before the ball 
becomes dead, B2 shoves A2. 

Ruling; The infractions are penalized in the order of 
their occurrence. Al will attempt the free throw or 
throws due him (including the substitute throw). The 
ball becomes dead when his last tl■^ is madr or 
missed, A2 will then be gi^'en his throw or tlirows. 



Postscripts On Athletics 

Dear Coach: 

The football season is over and nij- son Bill has him;; 
up his gridiron "togs" and will .soon report for bas 
ketball practice. Our school didn't win the distrid 
championship, but we won our share of game; plaved. 
and above all our team won the respect of our oppo- 
nents and our community by their fine sportsmanship 
and hard pla.\ . It was a verj- successful year for all 
and especialh toi- my son. 

As a parent. Coach, I am eternally thankful that my 
boy had the opportunity to play under your supervision 
and leadership. Each day during the football season 
my boy learned through example those fine mora] and 
ethical character traits which we all want our boys to 
know and to follow, I recall the night Bill told me how 
he nearly lost his temper in a scrimmage, but thought 
just in time that "Coach" never loses his temper, and 
neither will I, Thanks, Coach, for setting an exampk 
in proper conduct on and off the playing field. Bill tells 
me that Coach can be firm without being loud, mean 
and boisterous, that Coach knows when to sympathize, 
when to pat you on the shoulder, and how to correct 
you. These are leadership traits I want my son to ac- 
quire and he can best learn these on the field of com- 
petition under proper leadership. 

Obedience to Authority 

For three nronliis. Coach, my boj- has really been 
under your complete control. He has adjusted his life 
to your suggested plan. Meals, hours of sleep, social 
activity, etc., have all been adjusted to your schedule 
and through these he has learned voluntary obedience 
to rules; in his scrimmage and games he has further 
learned obedience to constituted authority. How much 
this obedience to rules and authority is needed in to- 
day's society! I believe Bill has learned this lesson. 
Coach, Bill imitates your every action; you are his 
ideal. How proud I am that your personal life and con- 
duct are on such a high level! My boy dresses better, 
speaks better English, and behaves better because 
Coacli sets the example. I wonder if all coaches real- 
ize how important a place they have in the school and 
community, and how many boys arc imitating them. 
Scliolarship 

Especially, Coach, I want to thank you for insisting 
that athletes study diligently, and stressing constantly 
the fact that scholastic work is so important. Bill told 
me that you had impressed on all of the team that 
football players are superior intellectually to the aver- 
age student and that they should make good grades 
because they have the ability to do so. This teaches the 
boys not to try and "ride by" because they are ath- 
letes. I had told Bill several times that Dr. Terman in 
Iris studies on gifted children had found that children 
with superior physical physiques have superior mental 
abilities. Hearing this same principle from his coach, 
however, made an impression which is lasting. 

Your emp'aasis on teamwork, cooperation, fair play, 
sportsmanship, honesty, integrity, obedience to author- 
ity, control of emotions, proper health habits, and 
proper conduct has earned for you a place of honor in 
the hearts of all the parents, the students, the faculty, 
and the community. 



In Memoriam 

John P. "Jack" Gossett of Ashland, Certi- 
fied basketball official and former coach at 
the Ashland Holy Family High School, died 
on January 4. He was 32 years of age. 

Jack Gossett graduated from Holy Family 
in 1952, having been a member of the bas- 
ketball team for three years. He led the 
1952 team to one of its best records. He 
plaved basketball at Rio Grande College dur- 
ing the 1953-1956 period. In the 1961-62 
basketball season, he had one of the best 
teams in the state while coaching at Holy 
Family. He had been a registered official 
with the K.H.S.A.A. for five years. 

For some five years Mr. Gossett had been 
Secretary-Treasurer of the First Federal 
Savings and Loan Association of Ashland. 
He was a member of Ashland Council 1487, 
Knights of Columbus ; Ashland Lodge B.P.O. 
Elks 350; Ashland Jaycees; and he was a 
Commissioner of the Eastern Kentucky 
Conference (basketball). He is survived by 
his wife, Colleen, and two children. 

The impact of your leadership is just as obvious in 
the community as in the school. Your active paii:ici- 
pation in civic, church and youth organizations proves 
that you are really concerned about all youth, and that 
you want to make our town a better place for every- 
one to live in. 

In conclusion. Coach, thanks again for all you have 
done for Bill and the youth of this community. We 
appreciate you and want you to know that this is a 
better community because you chose the profession of 
coaching and the leadership of youth. 

Your friend, 
Bill's Dad 
—Dr. Rhea H. Williams 
Texas Interscholastic Leaguer 



SUPPLEMENTARY LIST OF 

REGISTERED BASKETBALL OFFICIALS 

(List Compiled February 1) 

If one telephone number is given for an official listed, it is 
the home phone unless otherwise designated. If two numbers 
are given, the first number is that of the home phone. 

Allen, Harry Gordon, Box 163, Prestonsburg, 358-4397, 358-2691 

Burnett, Gerald T., Nunn Blvd.. Cadiz, LA 2-8204, LA 2-6654 

Carver, Arthur, 462-A St., Ft. Knox 

Duff. Birchell, Box 41, Garrett, 358-9191 (Bus.) 

Edgington. Fred, 409 East 7th St., Manchester, B43-5734 

Elkin, William T., 908 5th St.. Carrollton, 732-5312, 732-4244 

Frazier, William L,, 1436 Center St,, Catlettsburg, 739-5896, 

324-0710 
Giesecke, Irwin, 1217 Venetian Circle, Lexington, 266-0270, 

255-4180 
Jude. Dallas H., Matewan, W. Va. 

Kautz, John Robert, 1421 14th St., W., Nitro. W. Va. 
Laskey, George O.. P. 0., Box-M, Beattyville, 464-2509, 464-3967 
McBee. William K.. 76 Elwood, Burlington, 586-6462, 586-6171 
Marlette, Konald L., Ponderosa Trailer Park, Georgetown, 

863-3805 (Bus.) 
Maxwell, Robert B., 415 19th St., Dunbar, W. Va. 
Miller. Billy R., Route 2, Murray. PL 3-2307 
O'Nan, Harold L., Route 1, Robards, 521-7153 
Preece. Homer, Delbarton, W. Va. 
Roberts, Elza, Jr., Box 214, New Castle, 346-6981, Louisville 

584-1341 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR FEBRUARY, 1967 



Page Eleven 



Eoyce, Pete. 409 W. Brown St., Nicholasville, 885-5989, 886- 

Sharpe, Bob, 2909 Jessup Road, Cincinnati Ohio, 681-2110 
Werkowitz, Jack, 4614 Miller, Blue Ash, Ohio, 791-5382, 
791-5870 



K.H.S.C.A. Notice 

Secretary-Treasurer Joe Ohr of the Ken- 
tucky High School Coaches Association calls 
attention to the fact that membership in 
his organization runs from March I, 1967, to 
February 29, 1968. Two coaches in each 
school have their fees paid from district 
basketball tournament receipts. Other coach- 
es should apply to Mr. Ohr for their mem- 
bership cards. The new fee is $2.00. Mr. 
Ohr's address is Irvine High School, Irvine, 
Kentucky. 



Letter From the Commissioner 

(ConUnued from Inside Front Cover) 

or 1 :00 P.M. CENTRAL STANDARD TIME. 
This information concerning the starting 
time of the regional meeting should be giv- 
en to your winner and runner-up. 

12. Send Secretary Ohr of the Kentucky 
Coaches Association the list of district 
coaches to be enrolled in his organization 
and remittance for these, and send the 
Commissioner the various reports men- 
tioned above as soon as possible. 

13. Tournament Rule VI-A-3 provides 
that the district representative to the an- 
nual meeting may be allowed for expenses 
an amount not to exceed $50.00. Since this 
is a maximum and not necessarily a fixed 
amount, the delegate should be asked to sub- 
mit an estimate of the cost of his lodging, 
transportation, and meals because of his 
representing the district at the annual 
meeting. 

Sincerely yours, 
Ted Sanford 



I 



A Game Guy's Prayer, "Finally, God . . . help me not 
to whimper or squeal that the game was a frame-up, 
or that I had a raw deal— I would only like to know 
that you feel I have been a good guy." 

It Just Shouldn't Be 

It shouldn't be but iiigh school basketball's biggest 
problem remains unchanged— and unsolved. 

The problem: Attitude — particularly of coaches— to- 
ward officials. 

Basketball has no greater eyesore than a coach who 
doesn't know how to act Uke a leader and an educator 
on the sidelines. There is nothing in the game more 
distasieful than a coach — in complete violation of the 
bench conduct rule— who rants and raves and, worst 
of all, incites. 

Nobody is asking a coach to be impervious to the 
excitement and suspense of an important game or not 
to be frustrated by a call that could have gone either 
way. But there is no place for a coach who jumps up 
and down — or strips off his coat and hurls it into the 
bleachers! 

We would like to be able to say that the undisci- 
plined coach draws all the blame for this key prob- 
lem in basketball. But there is a companion contribu- 
tor in these critical situations. That "companion" is 
the official himself— the man who has the authority, 
but doesn't use it, to keep unrestrained coaches in line. 
There is natural reluctance, of course, on the part of 
officials to use their power in this area. But their 
failure to do so often contributes to the possibility of 
losing control of a game — and most assuredly it con- 
tributes to the delinquency of the coach. 

Tournament time is just around the corner, so this 
is a good time for reminders: To the coach who should 
not merely be guided by the rule but also by the spirit 
of the rule that calls for proper conduct on the side- 
lines, and to the official who should not hesitate — for 
the sake of maintaining proper control — to blow the 
whistle at an offending coach. 

It just shouldn't be, not at all, that we have a prob- 
lem like this! 

— WIAA Bulletin 



The Flying Dutchman 

(Continued from Page Four) 

should be directed to Lou Benn, J. C. Penney, 535 
South Fourth, Louisville, Kentucky. Because Lou is 
also handling the hospitality program for the National 
Collegiate Association Tournament in Louisville, he is 
rendering double civic service and qualifies for the 
Dutchman's corncob pipe of honor for unselfish serv- 
ice. The Utile trophy is in the mail to him now. 

As the Dutchman goes to press an invitation has 
come from Bob Hoffman to make the basketball ban- 
quet address in Jasper, Indiana. Because the pressure 
of my parks and recreation position in Jefferson Coun- 
ty limits my speaking activities to three basketball 
bsuiquets, please understand why some of your invita- 
tions cannot be accepted. 

About those problems we have written about in this 
column, let me quote you the following excerpt from 



Oxygen and Athletics 

There is no evidence Showing physiologic benefits 
from oxygen inhalation before or after athletic compe- 
tition; the body is incapable of storing excess oxygen. 
On the other hand, the potential harm from compe- 
tent administration of oxygen in the athletic setting is 
remote. The hazard is more in the realm of handling 
the combustion-supporting gas than in consuming it. 
Effective or ineffective, safe or unsafe, the bases for 
discrediting this practice lie in the principles under- 
lying the health and safety supervision of amateur 
sports. To amplify: 

1. Medically, the purpose of oxygen inhalation ther- 
apy is to help alleviate acute or chronic distress from 
deficient pulmonary ventilation as in instances of car- 
diac or respiratory illness. Also, experimentation using 
o.xygen therapy under mediccdly controlled conditions 
may be of scientific interest. However, the administra- 
tion of oxygen to healthy athletes before competition 
in the hope of gaining an advantage cannot be justi- 
fied. In fact, it might be compared to "doping" of 
athletes if it succeeded in improving performance. 

2. Educationally, healthy athletes who are given 
oxygen in the hope of speeding up physiologic recov- 



Page Twelve 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR FEBRUARY, 1967 



ANNOUNCING FOR 1967-1968 

The Special Football Plan Designed For Kentucky 
High School Football Coaches Association Will Be 
Offered In Connection With An Excellent Student 
Accident Coverage For Your Schools. 

Your Inquiries Will Be Answered Promptly. 



Hte> Kiwfd&*t QoHi/pjon^ 



W. E. KINGSLEY 



121-123 LAFAYETTE AVE3WE 
P. O. BOX 7100 



J. E. MoCREARY, Mgr. 
Life Department 

LEXINGTON, KY. 40502 



GENEK.\L AGENT 
CHARLES C. PRIcl 

PHONE 254-4095 



ery during participation in sports may be duped into 
relying on something other than the development of 
their natural cardiovascular-pulmonary reserve. More- 
over, the observing and emulating public may be duped 
as well. 

3. Professionally, the insecure or impatient coach 
may turn to such a practice at the expense of some 
aspect of sound athletic preparedness (conditioning, 
skills, strategy, and proper guidance of athletic de- 
sire) and thus may adversely affect the athlete's 
chances for safe, healthful, and effective experiences 
in competition. 

4. Financially, the ordinarily strained school or col- 
lege budget is further burdened with an unessential 
expense. 

In the one situation where oxygen inhalation might 
be useful — after strenuous exertion at Wgh altitudes by 
athletes unaccustomed to the heights— the need for 
oxygen therapy may be Hmited if a precompeUtion 
training period can be planned at those heights. While 
this situation would be a rare occurrence for inter- 
scholastic programs, the rationede that oxygen therapy 
is a medical matter for the alleviation of acute dis- 
tress would still apply. 

— Nationed Federation and A.M.A. 



Football Rule Changes 

Two major changes have been written into the rules 
which wUl govern high school football in 1967. 

As adopted by the National Alliance Football Rules 
Committee in Des Moines, Iowa, the changes are: 

1. The clock will start with the ready-for-play sig- 



nal following a penalty or declination of a penalty. 

(The rule in the past called for the clock to be 
stopped until the baU was snapped at the start of the 
subsequent play.) 

2. The length of the charged time-out period is re- 
duced to 90 seconds. 

(The rule in the past for time-outs called for two 
minutes.) 

Both changes will decrease to an extent the length 
of a contest, and this decrease wiU offset in part the 
revision of a year ago stopping the clock after a first 
down until the ready-for-play signal. The reduced 
tune-out period was particularly designed to eliminate 
the standing-around during time-outs late in the game 
when they are called only for the purpose of stopping 
the clock. 

Among other changes in the rules which will go into 
effect in 1967 are: 

1. The signal for holding has been changed from a 
chopping motion of the forearm to grasping the wrist. 

2. Two attendants instead of one will be allowed to 
go onto the field during time-out periods. 

3. A referee has authority to mark off an added 
penalty for an act he considers unfair or unsports- 
manlike, such as a coach arguing after an unsports- 
manlike foul has been 2issessed. 

There was discussion but no action on a proposal to 
change the conversion rule to two points for rushing 
or passing (along with the present one for a kick), and 
an effort to have the cross-bar of the goal posts 
moved over the goal line was turned down. 



SUTCLIFFE'S SALUTES 

the many individuals whose tireless efforts make our 

Kentucky tournament the success that it is the 

hundreds of behind-the-scenes specialists who know 
their jobs and do them so well. 

COACHES 



Try Sutcliffe's — supplying team 
and school athletic supplies for 
more than 60 years. 



Try Sutcliffe's fast shipping service 
from our huge Louisville warehouse 
stocks. 



Use Sutcliffe's field force of speci- 
alty school representatives whose 
business it is to help coaches and 
principals with their athletic equip- 
ment budget. 



Use Sutcliffe's for anything in 
athletic supplies from handballs to 
electric scoreboards. 



Sutcliffe's solicits your interest, 
your inquiries, and your orders. 




UTCLIFFE CO 



INCORPORATED 



959 LOUISVILLE 1. KENTUCKY 



HUNT'S ATHLETIC GOODS CO., INC. 
For All Of Your 1967 Spring Sports 

With the baseball and track season just around the comer, let us help 
you take care of all of your supplies from our complete stock. 

BASEBALL EQUIPMENT 

We have in stock baseball uniforms, trimmed and ready for sudden 
service, at $7.95. Our salesmen will show them to you on request. 

MacGregor #97 Official KHSAA baseballs. Reach American League 
Official baseballs, Spalding National League Official balls, and Hunt's 
Official League balls at prices from $1.50 to $2.35 each. 



Louisville Slugger bats; MacGregor & Wilson gloves, mitts, masks, 
body protectors and supplies. Also backstops and field markers. Complete 
service for field, court or gymnasium. 

TRACK SUPPLIES 

Shoes by Adidas, Puma, Riddell, Seco; vaulting poles — Silaflex Sky- 
pole and Thermoflex; Shots — iron, lead, brass or plastic, for high school, 
college, junior high or women. 

Watches — Aristo, Hanhardt, Seco, Ingraham. Batons — aluminum, 
plastic, wood; crossbars — magnesium, wood or aluminum. 



HUNTS ATHLETIC GOODS, Inc. 



Phone: Louisville, Ky, 
895-3396 
Wade Burleson 



Mayfield, Ky. 
247-1941 

Roy Boyd, Jim Mitchell, 
or C. A. Bym, Jr. 



>v.O>c c^ 



iBwe- Ship The- DaV'Vou BuV (i( 






Hiqh School AthMe 



THE NEWPORT CATHOLIC HIGH SCHOOL 
1967 CHAMPIONSHIP WRESTLING TEAM 



\ 




(Left to Right) Front Row: Joe Baumann, Gary McGlone, Jim Sho- 
maker, Dennis Huber, Dennis Martin, Greg Palmer. Second Row: Brother 
Joseph, Dennis Schofield, Ron Nieporte, Joe DiGiacomo, Tom Goety, Mike 
Fey, George Schuler, Don Peters. 



Official Organ of the 

KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION 

March, 1967 



\h 



Vy* 



Modern Ides of March 



The gym lights gleam like a beacon beam 

And a million motors hum 
In a good will flight on a Friday night; 

For basketball beckons, "Come!" 



A sharp-shooting mite is king tonight. 

The Madness of March is running. 
The winged feet fly, the baU sails high 

And field goal hunters are gunning. 



The colors clash as silk suits flash 
And race on a shimmering floor. 

Repressions die, and partisans vie 
In a goal acclaiming roar. 



On Championship Trail toward a holy grail. 
All fans are birds of a feather. 

It's fiesta night and cares lie light 
When the air is full of leather. 



Since time began, the instincts of man 
Prove cave and current men kin. 

On tournament night the sage and the wight 
Are relatives under the skin. 



It's festival time, — sans reason or rhyme 
But with nation-wide appeal. 

In a world of hate, our ship of state 
Rides high on an even keel. 



With war nerves tense, the final defense 
Is the courage, strength and will 

In a million lives where freedom thrives 
And liberty lingers still. 



Let commies clash and empires crash 
'Neath the wreck of a victory arch! 

Let our boys tread where hate is dead, — 
In this happy Madness of March! 

— H. V. Porter. 



( 



The Kentucky High School Athlete 

Official Organ of the 
Kentucky High School Athletic Association 



VOL. xxrx— NO. 8 



MARCH, 1967 



$1.00 Per Year 



Postscripts on Athletics 

By Rhea H. Williams 

Editor's Note; The article below appeared in a recent issue 
of the Texas Interscholastic Leajruer. Dr. Williams is State 
Athletic Director of the Texas University Interscholastic League. 

One of the greatest attributes of competi- 
tive athletics is the fact that it develops an 
appreciation for "making sacrifices." This 
particular contribution of athletics is seldom 
given due credit. In the eyes of many people 
it perhaps is the one contribution which 
ranks above all others which can be traced 
to the competitive program. 

General Robert E. Lee, the famous south- 
ern military leader, while president of Wash- 
ington and Lee College, said, "If a boy learns 
to appreciate the sacrifices which others 
have made for him and learns to make sac- 
rifices himself, then he has learned the 
greatest lesson which our educational sys- 
tems have to offer." 

Similar statements on the importance of 
learning to make "sacrifices" and to appre- 
ciate the "sacrifices" of others have been 
reiterated time and time again by outstand- 
ing people in all areas of life. 
Appreciation 

The only way that a boy can learn to 
appreciate the sacrifices of others is to make 
sacrifices himself on behalf of family, team, 
school or community. Nothing can develop 
in a boy a better appreciation of what others 
do for him than to practice the Biblical 
statement "It is better to give than to re- 
ceive." There is no better way to develop 
self-discipline than the ability to make sac- 
rifices. Discipline and sacrifice go hand in 
hand, regardless of whether it is on a per- 
sonal or group basis. 

Discipline 

One of the first and most important sacri- 
fices any athlete must make is to give up 
many of the so-called "pleasures" which ac- 
crue to non-athletes. This includes watching 
his diet and eating only the proper foods, 
getting regular hours of sleep and abstain- 
ing from tobacco and alcohol. It means 
that an athlete must discipline himself into 
giving up many parties, many dates and 
other social activities. Only through sacri- 
fice of this type can a boy achieve his best 
(Continued on Page Eight) 



ANNUAL MEETING SPEAKER 




Ray Eliot 

Speaker at the dinner meeting of the Ken- 
tucky High School Athletic Association, 
scheduled to be held in the Crystal Ballroom 
of the Brown Hotel, Louisville, on Thursday 
evening, April 13, 1967, will be Ray Eliot, 
staff member at the University of Illinois. 

Ray Eliot assumed duties as Assistant 
Director of Athletics at the University of 
Illinois on Januaiy 1, 1960, following retire- 
ment from active coaching after 28 years of 
service, 23 of which were at his alma mater, 
Illinois. 

As head football coach at Illinois from 
1942 through 1959, Mr. Eliot won or shared 
three Big Ten titles, and produced decisive 
victories in the two Rose Bowl games in 
which his teams appeared. Earlier, while 
serving as one of Bob Zuppke's line coaches, 
he also was head hockey coach and assist- 
ant baseball coach. 

Mr. Eliot graduated from the University 

of Illinois in 1932 and began his coaching 

career at Illinois College, Jacksonville. He 

served one year as assistant football coach, 

(Continued on Page Twelve) 



Page Two 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MARCH, 1967 



VOL. XXIX— NO. 8 



MARCH, 1967 



Published monthly, except June and July, by the Kentuck> 

Hiirh School Athletic Association 

Office of Publication, Lexin^on. Ky. 46501 

Second class postagre paid at Lexingrton. Kentucky. 

Editor THEO. A. SANFORL 

Assistant Editor J. B. MANSFIELL 

Lexin^on. Ky. 
BOARD OF CONTROL 

President Sherman Gish (1963-67). Greenvilli 

Vice-President Don Davis (1963-67). Independence 

Directors — Morton Combs (1964-68), Carr Creek: Ralph C 
Dorsey (1966-70). Horse Cave; Preston Holland (1965-69) 
Murray; Don R. Rawlin^s (1965-69), Danville; Foster .> 
Sanders (1966-70). Louisville; Oran C. Teater (1964-68,, 
Paintsville. 

Subscription Rate $1.00 Per Year 



Jiom the C< 



ommissionei s 



Offi 



ice 



REPORTS NOW DUE 

1. 1966-67 Basketball Participation List 

2. School's Report on Basketball Officials 

3. Official's Report on Schools 
(Basketball) 



Spring Meets 



Tentative dates have been set for the vari- 
ous spring meets anA tournaments in gym- 
nastics, rifle marksmanship, baseball, track, 
golf and tennis. They are as follows: 

April 1, State Gymnastics Meet, Louisville 

April 29, State Rifle Championship, Lex- 
ington 

May 8-10, district baseball tournaments 
(sites given below) 

May 12-13, regional track meets for boys 
and girls (sites given in February issue of 
ATHLETE) 

May 16, regional golf tournaments for 
boys and girls (sites given below) 

May 20, State Track Meets (Classes A, 
AA, and Ciirls), Lexington 

May 20, State Track Meet (Class AAA), 
Louisville 

May 23-24, Girls' State Golf Tournament, 
Louisville 

May 23-24, Boys' State Golf Tournament, 
Louisville 

May 26-27, regional baseball tournaments 
(sites given below) 

May 26-27, regional tennis tournaments 
for girls and boys (sites given below) 

June 2-3, Boys' and Girls' State Tennis 
Tournaments, Louisville 

June 7-8, State Baseball Tournament, 
Lexington 

In assigning schools to districts and re- 
gions for spring meets, the principal source 
of information is the blue statement form 
filed by the school principal when he enrolls 
his school in the Association. If a coach is 
listed for a sport, it is assumed that the 
school sponsors a team in that sport. In 



some instances the coach of a particular 
sport may not have been assigned at the 
time the statement form was filed, and in 
other instances the principal may have de- 
cided that a sport for which a coach was 
named will not be sponsored by the school 
this year. 

Principals should study the assignment of 
schools by districts and regions which ap- 
pears below to determine whether or not 
the listings for their schools are correct. 
The State Office should be notified only if 
the name of the school should be added to or 
omitted from any of the lists given. 



RIFLE MARKSMANSHIP 

Boone County, Henry Clay, Inez, LouisviUe Male, 
McKell, M. M. I., Oakdale Christian, Oldham County, 
Owensboro, Paul G. Blazer, Western. 

BASEBALL 

Paducah Region 

Christian County District — Attucks, Christian County, 
Dawson Springs, Ft. Campbell, HopldnsviUe, Trigg 
County 

Murray District — Benton, Calloway County, Murray, 
Murray University, North Marshall, South Marshall 

Paducah District — Ballard Memorial, Heath, Lone 
Oak, Reidland, St. Mary, Tilghman 

Mayfield District — Carlisle County, Cuba, FcUicy 
Farm, Hickman County, Lowes, Mayfield, Symsonia, 
Wingo 

Caldwell County District— Caldwell County, Critten- 
den County, Fredonia, Livingston Central, Lyon County 

Madisonville Region 

Henderson District — Henderson, Henderson County, 
Holy Name, Providence, St. Vincent, Union County, 
Webster County 

Leitchfield District— Butler County, Caneyville, Clark- 
son, Grayson County Catholic, Leitchfield 

Ohio County District— Breckinridge County, Fords- 
ville, Hancock County, Meade County, Oliio County 

Daviess County District— Daviess County, Livermore, 
Owensboro, Owensboro Catholic 

Madisonville District— Calhoun, Earlington, Maiiison- 
ville, Sacramento, South Hopkins, West Hopkins 

Central City District— Bremen, Central City, Drakes- 
boro, Graham, Greenville, Hughes Kirk, Muhlenberg 
Central 

Greensburg Region 

Bowling Green District— Bowling Green, Bristow, 
Franklin-Simpson, North Warren, Richardsville, War- 
ren County 

Auburn District — ^Adairville, Auburn, Lewisburg, Rus- 
sellville, Todd County 

Glasgow District— Austin Tracy, Glasgow, HiseviUe, 
Park City, Scottsville, Temple Hill 

Tompkinsville District — Cumberland County, Gama- 
liel, Metcalfe County, Tompkinsville 

Caverna District — Caverna, Cub Run, Hart Memo- 
rial, LaRue County, Munfordville 

North Hardin District— East Hardin, Elizabethtown, 
Elizabethtown Catholic, Ft. Knox, North Hardin, West 
Hardin 

Campbellsville District— Adair County, CampbeUs- 
ville, Greensburg, Lebanon, St. Augustine, St. Charles, 
St. Francis, Taylor County 

St. Joseph District — ^Bardstown, Lebanon Jimction, 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MARCH, 1967 



Page Three 



Mt. Washington, St. Joseph Prep, Shepherdsville, 
Washington County, Willisburg 

Jefferson County Region 

Pleasure Ridge Park District— Bishop David, Butler, 
Pleasure Ridge Park, VaUey, Western 

Ahrens District^Ahrens, Central, Flaget, Shawnee 

Trinity District— duPont Manual, Louisville Country 
Day, Louisville Male, Trinity 

Southern District— DeSales, Fairdale, Iroquois, South- 
ern, Thomas Jefferson 

Eastern District— Eastern, Kentucky Military Insti- 
tute, Seneca, Waggener, Westport 

St. Xavier District— Atherton, Durrett, Fern Creek, 
St. Xavier 

Newport Region 

Boone County District— Boone County, Dixie Heights, 
Lloyd, St. Henry, Simon Kenton 

Holy Cross District— Beechwood, Covington Catholic, 
Holmes, Holy Cross, Ludlow 

Silver Grove District— Bishop Brossart, Campbell 
County, Highlands, St. Thomas, Silver Grove 

Grant County District— Falmouth, Grant County, 
Pendleton County, Walton-Verona, Williamstown 

Newport District— Bellevue, Dayton, Newport, New- 
port Catholic 

Tollesboro District— Augusta, Bracken County, Dem- 
ing, Fleming County, Lewis County, Mason County, 
Maysville, St. Patrick, Tollesboro 

Lexington Region 

Woodford County District— Anderson, Frankfort, 
Franklin County, Georgetown, Scott County, Woodford 
County 

Bourbon County District— Bourbon County, Harrison 
County, Millersburg Military Institute, Nicholas County, 
Paris 

Garrard County District— Danville, Garrard County, 
Harrodsburg, Jessamine County, Kentucliy School for 
the Deaf, Mercer County, Stanford 

;Shelbyville District— Oldham County, Shelby County, 
Shelbyville, Taylorsville 

Mt. Vernon District— Crab Orchard, Hustonville, lib- 
erty. Memorial (Waynesburg), Mt. Vernon 

Eminence District— Carroll County, Eminence, Galla- 
tin County, Henry County, Owen County, Trimble 
County 

Lexington District— Bryan Station, Dunbar, Henry 
Clay, Lafayette, Lexington Cathohc, Tales Creek 

Richmond District— Berea, Estill County, Irvine, 
Madison, Madison Central, Model 

London Region 

Somerset District— Burnside, Eubank, Ferguson, Pu- 
laski County, Somerset 

Lee County District— Clay County, Jackson County, 
Lee County, Oneida Institute, Owsley County, Powell 
County, Riverside Christian 

Harlan District — Cumberland, Evarts, Harlan, James 
A. Cawood, Lynch 

Elkhorn City District — Belfry, Elkhorn City, Fleming- 
Neon, Jenkins, Johns Creek, Mullins, Phelps, Pikeville, 
Virgie 

Hazel Green District— Bush, Hazel Green, Lily, 
London 

Monticello District— McCreary County, Monticello, 
Pine Knot, Russell County, Wayne County 

Middlesboro District— Barbourville, Corbin, Hender- 
son Settlement, Lone Jack, Middlesboro, Whitley Coun- 
ty, Williamsburg 

Hazard District — Buckhorn, Combs Memorial, Haz- 
ard, Hindman, Leslie County, Letcher, M. C. Napier, 
Whitesburg 



Morehead Region 

Ashland District— Boyd County, Catlettsburg, Fair- 
view, Louisa, Paul Blazer 

McKell District— Greenup, McKell, Raceland, Rus- 
sell, Wurtland 

Montgomery County District — Bath County, George 
Rogers Clark, Montgomei-y County, Mt. Sterling 

Morehead District — Ezel, Hitchins, Morgan County, 
Olive Hill, Prichard, Rowan County, Sandy Hook, 
University Breckinridge 

Paintsville District— Blaine, Flat Gap, Inez, Meade 
Memorial, Oil Springs, Paintsville, Van Lear 

McDowell District— Martin, Maytown, McDowell, 
Prestonsburg 



GOLF FOR GIRLS 

Bowling Green Region — Bowling Green, Campbells- 
ville, Hopkinsville, Ohio County, Owensboro, Scotts- 
ville, Tompkinsville, Warren County 

Frankfort Region— Beechwood, Frankfort, Franklin 
County, George Rogers Clark, Lebanon, London, Mt. 
Sterling, Owen County, Shelbyville 

Louisville Region — Eastern, Oldham County, Wag- 
gener, Westport 

Paintsville Region— Hazard, Paintsville, Paul G. Bla- 
zer, Pikeville, Prestonsburg. 

GOLF FOR BOYS 

Princeton Region — ^Benton, Caldwell County, Critten- 
den County, Fort Campbell, Fulton, Hopkinsville, May- 
field, Murray, North Marshall, Paducah Tilghman, St. 
Mary 

Bowling Green Region^Adair County, Bowling 
Green, Elizabethtown, Elizabethtown Catholic, Glas- 
gow, Hart Memorial, RussellviUe, Scottsville, Todd 
County, Tompkinsville, University, Warren County. 

Owensboro Region — Central City, Daviess County, 
Greenville, Henderson, Henderson County, Madison- 
vnie, Meade County, Ohio County, Owensboro, Owens- 
boro Catholic, Providence, St. Vincent 

Bardstown Region — ^Bardstown, Boyle Coimty, Camp- 
bellsville, Danville, Fort Knox, Harrodsburg, Lebanon, 
Lebanon Junction, Old Kentucky Home, St. Joseph 
Prep., Shepherdsville, Washington County 

Franldort Region — Anderson, Bryan Station, Frank- 
fort, Franldin County, George Rogers Clark, George- 
town, Harrison County, Henry Clay, Lafayette, 
M.M.I. , Mt. Sterling, Oldham County, Shelby County, 
Shelbyville, Tales Creek. 

West Jefferson Region — Ahrens Trade, Bishop David, 
Butler, DeSales, Fairdale, Flaget, Iroquois, Pleasure 
Ridge Park, Shawnee, Southern, Thomas Jefferson, 
Valley, Western 

East Jefferson Region — Atherton, duPont Manual, 
Durrett, Eastern, Fern Creek, K.M.I. , LouisviUe Coun- 
try Day, Louisville Male, St. Xavier, Seneca, Trinity, 
Waggener, Westport 

Covington Region— Beechwood, Boone County, Camp- 
bell County, Covington Catholic, Dayton, Dixie Heights, 
Highlands, Holmes, Holy Cross, Lloyd Memorial, Ma- 
son County, Newport, Newport Cathohc, Pendleton, St. 
Henry, St. Thomas, Silver Grove, St. Patrick 

Middlesboro Region— Foundation, Garrard County, 
Harlan, Irvine, Knox Central, London, Lynch, Lynn 
Camp, McCreary County, Madison, Madison Central, 
Middlesboro, Model, Somerset 

PaintsviUe Region— Boyd County, Fairview, Fleming 
County, Hazard, Holy Family, Jenkins, McKell, Mar- 
tin, Paintsville, Paul G. Blazer, Pikeville, Prestons- 
burg, Prichard, Russell, University Breckinridge 



Page Four 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MARCH, 1967 



TENNIS FOR GIRLS 

Murray Region — Fort Campbell, Henderson, Hender- 
son County, Hopkins\'ille, Murray 

Bowling Green Region — ^Bowling Green, Elizabeth- 
town, Elizabethtown Catliolic, Franklin-Simpson, Ow- 
ensboro, Warren County 

Hart Memorial Region — Campbellsville, Caverna, 
Hart Memorial, LaRue County, Meade County 

West Jefferson County Region — Butler, Central, du- 
Pont Manual, Fairdale, Holy Rosary, Loretto, Thomas 
Jefferson 

East Jefferson County Region — Eastern, Fern Creek, 
Mercy Academy, Presentation, Sacred Heart, UrsuHne 
Academy, Westport 

Bellexaie Region— Beechwood, Bellevue, Highlands, 
Lloyd Memorial, Notre Dame Academy 

Richmond Region— Bryan Station, Franklin County, 
Hazel Green, Henry Clay, Middlesboro, Somerset 

Ashland Region — Fair\'iew, Paul Blazer, Pikewlle, 
Russell, University Breckinridge 

TENNIS FOR BOYS 

BowUng Green Region — Attucks, Bowling Green, 
Caldwell County, Caverna, Fort Campbell, Franklin- 
Simpson, Glasgow, Hart Memorial, Hopkinsville, Rus- 
seUville, Universit>', Warren County 

West Jefferson Region — Bishop David, Butler, Fair- 
dcile, Iroquois, Pleasure Ridge Park, Southern, Thom- 
as Jefferson, Valley, Western 

Fort Knox Region — Campbellsville, Elizabethtown, 
Fort Knox, Greensburg, Henderson, Henderson County, 
LaRue County, Meade County, Owensboro, Owensboro 
Catholic, St. Joseph Prep. 

East Jefferson Region — Durrett, Eastern, Fern 
Creek, K.M.I. , Seneca, Trinity, Waggener, Westport 

Louisville Region— Atherton, Central, DeSales, du- 
Pont Manual, Flaget, Louisville Male, Shawnee, St. 
Xavier 

Bellevue Region— Beechwood, Bellevue, Covington 
Catholic, Highlands, Holmes, Lloyd Memorial, Mason 
Count>', Owen County, Newport, Newport Catholic 

Lexington Region — Bryan Station, Danville, Franklin 
County, Georgetown, Harrodsburg, Henry Clay, Lafay- 
ette, M.M.I. , Shelbyville, Tates Creek, Woodford County 

Richmond Region — Foundation, Garrard County, Ha- 
zel Green, Middlesboro, Mt. Sterling, Paul G. Blazer, 
Pikeville, Russell, Somerset 



Soccer Clinic 

A Soccer Clinic for both coaches and offi- 
cials will be held at Berea College April 14 
and 15. The purpose of the clinic is to pre- 
sent the game of Soccer to the school people 
of the area who have expressed interest in 
the game. All phases from the teaching of 
fundamental skills to coaching and playing 
strategy will be covered. 

Mr. Pat Smith, a soccer player of standing 
in England ; Mr. Jerry Yeagley, Soccer coach 
of Indiana University ; and Dick Klein- 
schmidt, a nationally recognized soccer ref- 
eree, will be visiting staff. Mr. Charles Con- 
ley, coach of the Berea College soccer team, 
will be in charge of the clinic and his team 
will assist in the demonstration. Displays, 
films, discussions, lectures, in addition to 
the work on the field, will be presented. 

The first meeting will be held on Friday 



evening at 7:30. The last session will be on 
Saturday evening at 6:00. A registration fee 
of $1.00 will be charged. Meals may be ob- 
tained at the Berea College Food Service. 
Housing requests should be sent to Mr. 
Charles Conley. 



The Basketball Hall of Fame 

During the school year 1965-66, additional 
K.H.S.A.A. member schools making contri- 
butions or pledges to the Basketball Hall of 
Fame brought the total number of contrib- 
uting schools to fifty-five. Of this number, 
forty schools have taken out or will take out 
Group Memberships at $100.00 each. Con- 
tributing members are listed below. 
$100 Contributions and Pledges 



Allen County Ezel 

Bishop David Fairview 

Bloomfield Harlan 

Bourbon County Hazard 

Breathitt Henry Clay 

Calhoun Inez 



Ohio County 

Owensboro 

Paducah Tilghman 

Pikeville 

Pleasure Ridge Park 

Reidland 



Caneyville Ky. School for Deaf Rowan County 

Carr Creek Leslie County St. Marsr's (Whites- 

Caverna Livingston Central ville) 

Covington Catholic Logan Co. A. A. Sayre 

Danville Mason County Tates Creek 

Daviess County Midway Tompkinsville 

Dayton M. M. I. Valley 

Durrett Morgan County 

Contributions Less Than $100 

Beechwood Holmes Prichard 

Campbell County Knott County Pulaski County 

Campbellsville Monticello Shopville 

Central Nancy Somerset 

Ferguson Paintsville Wayne County 



Registered Baseball Officials 

(List Compiled March 1) 

If one telephone number is given for an official listed, it is 
the home phone unless otherwise designated. If two numbers 
are given, the first number is that of the home phone. 

Ashley, Kenneth, Science Hill, 423-8521, 423-3341 

Berger, John D., Jr., Route 1, Toms Brook, Virginia 

Callis, Herbert, 1646 East 17th St., Bowling Green, 2-2348, 

2-5351 
Canter, John, 2826 Esther Blvd., Louisville, 451-8218, 587-8862 
Carter. Phillip Ray, Whitley City, 376-2517 
Chesney, Orville A., Lot 46 P.T.C., Ft. Campbell, 798-3348, 

798-3400 
Clardy, Barry Daniel, Route 2, Box 188C, Greenville, 338-3510, 

338-3036 
Clark. Robert L., 3003-G, Hammond Heights, Ft. Campbell, 

798-4779, 798-3320 
Clements, John L., 1038 Delia Drive, Lexington, 278-6587 
Cline, Roy E., 1194 Lincoln, Louisville, 637-8249 
Cubbage, Tom, 317 N. English, Leitchfield, 259-3457, 259-3644 
Gulp, Willard, 318 Skyline Park Drive, Hopkinsville, 886-7967, 

798-5861 
Davenport, James E., Dawson Hill Rd., Jeffersontown, 239-5667, 

454-2511 ext. 3947 
Davis, Bunny, 594 West Lexington, Danville, 236-2606, 236-2606 
Dieterle, Owen M., Box 135, Millersburg, 484-2076, Lexington 

262-0640 
Donoghue, Terry, 3171 Hickory Lane. Erlanger, 341-9685 
Duerson, William Robert. Route 2, Paint Lick, 925-2357, 

792-2459 
Duvall, James W., Barnes Campbell, Box 9061, Bowling Green, 

745-2759 
Elliott. Billy A.. 6504 Mock Court, Pleasure Eidge Park, 

937-4343 
Elliott, Carroll L., 307 College St., Elizabethtown, 765-4007, 

765-6118 
Emery, George A., 234 Clay, New Albany, Ind., 944-5257, 

BU 3-3511 ext. 242 
Eyl, Edward W., Jr., 2252 Bradford Drive, Louisville, GL 

2-1001 
Fairchild, Hays, Trimble County High School, Bedford 
Farris, Reuben L., 308 Coyle. Box 135, Owingsville, 674-2291, 

674-4251 
Frankel, Louis S., 3723 Stanton Blvd., Louisville, 454-6519, 

454-6519 
Gibson, Robert. 202 Michigan, Monticello, 348-2586, 348-2586 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MARCH, 1967 



Page Five 



Giordano, Al, 107 Ratliff, Princeton, 365-5G80, 365-5616 
Goodan, William, Box 325, Whitley City, 376-2418 (Bus.) 
Gour, Bob, 218 South Lee, Bowling Green, 843-9582, 745-4293 
Cover, J. Luid, East 80, Box 706, Somerset, 679-1695, 678-5506 
Griffith, Edwin Dale, 2334 E. Jepson St., Ashland, 324-2497, 

324-1155 ext. 276 
Guess, James E., 949 McClure Ave., Henderson, S26-2116, 

521-6601 
Hardin, Don G., Box 88. Morehead, 784-7376 
Heitlinger. Lester, 3647 Johnston Way, Louisville, 159-3699, 

895-3401 ext. 288 
Herndon, Howard Eugene, Route 1, Wingo, 376-2916 
Home, Jordan E., Jr., 3804 Frontier Trail, Louisville, 451-6624, 

584-5215 
Hubbs, Cletus L., Jr., 303 West 15th St., Hopkinsville. 885-8578, 

886-3384 
Hudson, J. D., Caneyville, 879-6241, 879-44G6 
Ingraham, Gary J., 9706 Lanesboro Way, Louisville, 425-5215, 

897-2816 
Ingram, William R., 5466-H, Lowe. Ft. Knox, 4-3077, 4-7456 
Ireland, Jan L., 717 W. Locust, Princeton, 366-6439, 365-2635 
Jacobs. Robert L., 3320 Lexington Road, Louisville, 896-6082 
Jent, Richard, 209 Legion Drive, Fi'anklin, 586-8188, Lexington, 

258-9000 
Johnson. James M., 174 Pinehurst Dr., Frankfort. 223-2822, 

223-8359 
Johnson, Robert L.. 6 Jamestown PI., Clai'ksville, Tenn., 

647-3982. 798-5493 
Jones, Frank. Box 718, Manchester, 598-2706, 623-9877 
Jones. Joe S., 203 Green St., Manchester, 698-3793, 598-2129 
Kasperski, Harry W., 3652-B Fincastle Rd.. Louisville, 461- 

1065. 582-5215 
Kaufman, Alvin R.. 8215 St. Anthony Church Road, Louisville, 

366-0126, 587-0871 
Kays, AUie, Route 5, Box 75B, Shelbyville, 633-3203, Louis- 
ville 896-8819 
Keeling, Reuben, Route 8, Theobold Rd., Paducah, 443-5260, 

442-5431 
Kidwell, James S., 1112 Parkway, Covington, 581-9141 
King. James A., 5000 Clarmar Rd., Jeffersontown. 239-8015, 

776-2466 
Kimmel, Jerry. Beechmont. 476-2656, 476-2656 

Legeay, August J., Jr., 315 No. 32rd St.. Paducah. 442-0663 
Lindsey. Jack. Blackey, Whitesburg, 633-7666 (Bus.) 
Long, Bill, 209 Idlewylde Drive, Louisville. 895-8731, 582-2613 
Manning, Conley, Box 72, Whitley City, 376-2282, 376-2213 
Marlette, Ronald L., Ponderosa Trailer Ct., Georgetown, 

863-3806 (Bus.) 
Martin, Roger K.. Box 174, Park City. 749-8425, 749-2860 
Mattingly, Charles, 3813 Poplar Level Rd., Louisville, 459-5793 
Mills. William L., St. Mary, 692-4605, 692-4256 
Mooneyhan. James H.. 810 Henry St.. Franklin. 586-4989, 

586-4451 
Morgan. Richard. Route 6. Box 64. London. 864-6511, 864-5114 
Morse, Richard K., 163 N. Deepwood Dr., Radcliff, 351-3748, 

Ft. Knox 4-4454 
Norwood. Thomas R., 811 Henry St., Franklin, 586-3614, 

586-3541 
Nuckles, Thomas H.. 1602 Vivian Lane. Louisville. 454-6883 
Pardue. Israel L., 1005 South 28th St.. Louisville. 772-2488 
Pence, William Jerry, Summit, 862-4517 

Penner, Merritt D., Jr.. Route 4. Box 739. Manchester, 598-3711 
Prather, Edwin Eugene, Route 2, LaGrange, 279-5153, 241-8491 
Raines. J. W., 1117 Lebanon Rd., Danville, 236-3380 
Reif, Harry F.. East College St., Box 289, New Castle, 

346-5284, 346-8421 
Roberts. Kenneth G., Route 1, Crestwood 
Salyer. Henry E., 4829 Bluebird Ave., Louisville, 969-6371, 

778-2731 ext. 456 
Sammons, John L, 1106 Elm, Murray. 753-5738, 753-3642 
Scott. W. L.. 1816 McDonald. Lexington, 278-2844, 264-1818 
Smith, Gerald. 1414 College St.. Bowling Green. 842-3364 
Stethen, James E.. Stone St., Box 134, Bedford, 26B-3285 
Stewart. Buddy. Main St.. Brownsville. 597-2193 
Strain. Richard P., Box 472, Radcliff, 351-4306, Fort Knox 

4-6757 
Swinford. James W., 5502 Oak Creek Lane, Fern Creek, 

239-0055, 448-2761 
Thomas, Patrick H.. Box 43, Leitchfield, 259-3010, 255-9424 
Tyre, Donald, 316 Senate Drive, Frankfort 
Varble, William. 3108 Widgeon Ave., Louisville. 775-6712, 

772-3621 
Vincent, Johnny, 1212 Park St., Bowling Green, 842-9209 
Waller, Bobbie E., 309 Strathmore, Lexington, 299-6123, 

299-6123 
Washer, Jamie Don, 507 South 7th St.. Murray. 753-5330, 

753-5312 
Way, James, 211 West Penn. Cynthiana, 234-2361, 234-4393 
Wesche, James Allen, 1704 Chickasaw, Lexington, 299-8058 
Wiley, Howard E., 199 Bridge St., Paintsville, 789-6546, 789-3663 
Winfrey, Shelby, 315 Sharon Drive, Campbellsville, 465-8392, 

465-8392 
Wingfield, Felix G., 1132 Eastern Parkway, Louisville, 636-2282 
Wolford, W. D., Route 1, Campbellsville, 465-5459. 465-8880 
Woosley, Travis, Box 524, Calvert City, 396-4667, 395-4133 
Wren, Bethel, Route 2, Paint Lick, 792-2751 



SUPPLEMENTARY LIST OF 
REGISTERED BASKETBALL OFFICIALS 

(List Compited March 1) 

If one telephone number is given for an official listed, it is 
the home phone unless otherwise designated. If two numbers 
are given, the first number is that of the home phone. 

Blankenship, Zeb, Route 3. Harrodsburg. 734-3702 
DeGroote, James, 2905 E. Mulberry, Evansville, Indiana 
C.oins, Homer H., F-101 Shawneetown, Lexington, 278-4074 
Larsen, George, 7864-A Estrada, Fort Knox, 4-6987, 4-7412 
Peters, Arthur, Sasser, 864-2331 (Bus.) 
Smith, llary U., 600 Walnut, Waverly, Ohio, 947-4627, 947-2153 



KAPOS NEWS 
State Tournament Plans 

On February 11 the members of the exec- 
utive board of KAPOS met at the Kentucky- 
Hotel to discuss plans for the week of the 
State Tournament. It was decided to have a 
welcome booth in the lobby of the Kentucky 
Hotel. Please stop by to: register your 
squad, get your hotel room assignment, and 
pick up your envelope containing KAPOS 
handbook and tournament information. The 
handbook contains information pertaining 
to the membership of KAPOS, basis for 
awarding of the trophies, events to be of- 
fered by the hospitality committee, brack- 
ets, and the times for the games, etc. 

High School cheerleaders will be on hand 
to assist you. They can be identified by their 
hostess arm band. Feel free to ask them for 
help, and in turn they may seek you or your 
cheerleaders to be interviewed by one of the 
radio commentators. 

Hospitality Room 

All sponsors and cheerleaders are cordially 
invited to come to the cheerleader Hospital- 
ity Room in Freedom Hall. Refreshments are 
available. 

Trophies to Be Awarded 

Both a winner's and a runner-up cup will 
be given to the outstanding cheerleading 
groups at the 1967 State Tournament. Third 
place in the judging will be given honorable 
mention recognition. Harrison County High 
School won the first place award last year. 
Lexington Catholic High School was runner- 
up. , 

All cheerleaders are asked to wear their 
cheerleader uniforms for the final Saturday 
night game. Photographers will be present 
to take pictures of the winners, so be pre- 
pared to represent your school in a fashion 
to make them proud of you. 

The sponsors of the winner and runner-up 
schools are asked to come to the floor with 
their cheerleaders. Besides getting the rec- 
ognition you so well deserve, it is another 
way of letting the public know that cheer- 
leading is important enough in the school's 
curriculum to merit a "sponsor-coach." 
Scholarship Award to Be Continued 

Miss Cheri Steen, our third scholarship 
(Continued on Page Eight) 



Paee Six 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MARCH, 1967 



The Flying Dutchman 

Mark your calendars for March 28, 29 as 
a memo for you to show up at Stouffer's 
Inn in Louisville for the conference of the 
Kentucky Recreation and Parks Society. 
Hopkinsville's Mary DeBow, president of the 
Society, is the winner of The Flying Dutch- 
man's corn cob pipe of honor for her unself- 
ish work for parks and recreation on a 
state-wide basis. Mary has a list of out- 
standing leaders lined up for the conference 
which includes Dr. Fred Darling, John Get- 
tler, Celeste Gray, Dopey Phelps, Bill Kaiser, 
Sam Jones and Dr. Harry Sparks. 

Regardless of which sport or recreational 
phase you are interested in, you will find 
the information you need at this confer- 
ence. Every high school coach and athletic 
director should make this meeting a must. 
The conference opens with a luncheon at 
12:30 noon, Tuesday, March 28th. 

Jack McKinney, Coach of Lone Oak, calls 
the officials' attention to the defensive bas- 
ketball players who cause fouls to be called 
on the offensive players because they are 
good actors. An example is when A2 drives 
at B3 and B3 falls back on the floor indi- 
cating that A2 has charged him when actu- 
ally there was no contact. Again the Dutch- 
man emphasizes that a player reclining on 
the floor is of no value to his team. The 
defensive players would quickly stop this 
practice if the officials are careful to call 
such fouls only when there is contact. Jack 
McKinney is one of the strongest supporters 
Kentucky sports officials have and his con- 
structive suggestions are welcome — On the 
wall in the Dutchman's office hangs a sign 
which reads, "The trouble with most of us 
is that we would rather be ruined by praise 
than saved by criticism." 

From the National Federation's office 
came some high praise for last month's 
Dutchman column. Cliff Fagan says that he 
plans to send the part concerning coaches 
and officials to all of the state high school 
athletic associations affiliated with the 
National Federation. 

Butch Charmoli, known as Mr. Manual 
High School in Louisville, has brought hon- 
or to Kentucky. John Bunn, executive direc- 
tor of the Basketball Federation of the 
United States, sends us the information that 
personable, dynamic Butch has been named 
Chairman of the Fourth District which in- 
cludes a half dozen states. The meeting of 
the National Basketball Federation will be 
held on March 24th at the Kentucky Hotel. 
Butch will be right at home with his long- 




Mary DeBow 

time friend Cliff Fagan who is president of 
the organization and Lyle Quinn, the Dutch- 
man's old buddy, who runs the high school 
athletic program in Iowa. 

Jim Nixon, one of the best officials ever 
to blow a whistle in western Kentucky, has 
moved from Hopkinsville to Atlanta. Here's 
a real loss for our state and a tremendous 
gain for Georgia. They should have made a 
lot more like Jim before they threw the mold 
away. 

Kentucky's Game Guy of 1967 is Eliza- 
bethtown's David Harmond. A senior, Dave 
has a fine reputation for leadership, scholar- 
ship and loyalty. He has made his mark 
both in football and basketball in spite of 
his physical handicap. All of Hardin County 
is proud of Dave Harmond who whipped a 
ruptured spleen to play ball and is going on 
to college to become a doctor. Kentucky's 
game guys go marching on, making new rec- 
ords of achievement in later life. It makes 
us wonder why we complain when these 
physically handicapped kids don't. They just 
go on producing results in places where 
rugged physical specimens shy away from 
because of the rough sledding. 

Just after the balloting for the Game Guy 
of 1967 closed, nominations started rolling 
in for 1968 and the first nomination came 
from Coach Paul E. DeZarn of Aquinas 
School in St. Matthews. Paul is working with 
an 18-year-old fighter who is a soccer star 
besides performing on the hardwood. The 
lad is James Haragon who was thrown into 
a salamander when his Honda hit a bump. 
The hot oil ignited his clothing and his re- 
( Continued on Page Nine) 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MARCH, 1967 



Page Seven 



CAVERNA— BARREN RIVER EIGHT-MAN CONFERENCE CHAMPION 




(Left to Riflrht) Front Row: Mgr. Jerry Martin, Dennis Toms, Rickey Davis, Diclcie Daniell, Kandy 
Donselmap. Glen Clark, Nick Gnnn, Jackie Minor, Wayne Hagiiea, Lannie Hatcher, Mgr. Jimmy Minor. 
Second Row: -Iss't Coacli Dennis Doyle, Virffil Proffitt, Mike Hartz, Keith Clark, Jerry Goodhue, Bmce 
Gentry, Dale Gieen, Archie Hay, Jerry Logsdon, Robert Kinslow, Coach C. J. Ramsey. Third Row: Steve 
Carter, Donnie Donselman, Mike Lawson, Burks McGlasson, Larry Wilkins, Johnny Doyle, David John- 
son, Andy Broome. 



State Wrestling Tournament 

The 1967 State High School Wrestling 
Tournament was held at the Jeffersontown 
High School, Jeffersontown, on February 
9-11. The Newport Catholic High School, 
with three individual champions, captured 
the tournament title with 97 points. The 
North Hardin High School was second with 
86 points. St. Joseph of Bardstown had the 
meet's "Most Outstanding Wrestler" in Pete 
McKay. The 120-pound champion in 1966, 
McKay took the 133-pound division this 
year. 

The tournament was managed by Wres- 
tling Committee Chairman Orville Williams 
of the Seneca High School. It was the fourth 
tournament sponsored by the K.H.S.A.A. 
Twenty-one teams participated in the tour- 
nament. Teams which scored finished in 
this order: 1-Newport Catholic, 97; 2-North 
Hardin, 86; 3-M.M.I., 65; 4-Hopkinsvine, 
47; 5-(Tie) Kentucky School for the Blind 
and Fort Campbell, 34; 7-Bardstown St. Jo- 
seph, 31; 8-Flaget, 30; 9-Westport, 23; 10- 
Eastem, 20; 11-Trinity, 18; 12-Seneca, 16; 
18-Oldham County, 12; 14-Caldwell County, 
10; 15-Campbell County, 8; 16-Corbin, 7; 
17-Danville, 5; 18-Bush, 2; 19-Trigg Coun- 
ty, 1. 

Successfully defending their titles were 
Kentucky School for the Blind's James Earl 
Hardin in the 165-pound division ; Newport 
Catholic's Mike Fey (154) and Millei'sburg 
Military Institute's Pete Anderson (heavy- 
weight). North Hardin's Jay Crawford, 95- 
pound champion last year, won the 112 divi- 



sion and Mike Givens of Hopkinsville went 
from 112 to 120 champion. 

Medals were awarded to the first three 
places in each class. These winners were as 
follows : 

95 lb. — Arvil Meyers, North Hardin; 
Charles Meyers, St. Joseph; Jack Kurtz, 
'M.M.I. 

103 lb. — Dennis Huber, Newport Catholic; 
Ed Kuhl, Fort Campbell; David Bridge- 
water, Seneca 

112 lb. — Jay Crawford, North Hardin; 
Dennis Martin, Newport Catholic; Reginald 
Boston, Fort Campbell 

120 lb. — Mike Givens, Hopkinsville; Mike 
Uhde, Trinity ; Ron Nieporte, Newport Cath- 
olic 

127 lb. — Eddie Wade, Hopkinsville; Larry 
Cook, Kentucky School for the Blind ; Gary 
McGlone, Newport Catholic 

133 lb.— Pete McKay, St. Joseph; Tom 
Cox, North Hardin; Mike Konvalinka, Fort 
Campbell 

138 lb. — Greg Palmer, Newport Catholic; 
Pete Burns, North Hardin; Richard Des- 
Combes, M.M.I. 

145 lb. — Ed Brandon, North Hardin; Tom 
Welsh, Flaget; James Nichols, Caldwell 
County 

154 lb. — Mike Fey, Newport Catholic; 
Charlie Bowen, M.M.I. ; Greg Erwin, North 
Hardin 

165 lb. — James Earl Hardin, Kentucky 
School for the Blind ; Joe DiGiacomo, New- 
port Catholic; Theodore Arnold, Fort Camp- 
bell 

180 lb.— Pete Allen, M.M.I. ; Jim Schnider, 



Page Eight 



THE KENTUCK"^ HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MARCH, 1967 




Fete McKay 



Newport Catholic ; Larry Brame, Hopkins- 
ville 

Heavyweight — Pete Anderson, M.M.I. ; 
Ricky Deason, Hopkinsville ; Dave Hill, 
Campbell County 



POSTSCRIPTS ON ATHLETICS 

(Continued from Page One) 
physical and mental condition and best in- 
iS'Ure that he will be ready to give his best 
for his team. 

Give Up Ego 

It is necessary that each athlete sacrifice 
his own personal ego and his own personal 
dreams of achieving individual glory in or- 
der that the team may participate as a well- 
organized unit. There are countless numbers 
of instances on record where failure of indi- 
vidual boys to make sacrifices in regard to 
team unity have resulted in team failure. 

Most people are self-centered, and one of 
the most difficult disciplines is the sacri- 
fice which eleven individual boys must 
make in order to develop a well-organized 
team effort in football. Although this par- 
ticular individual ego must be disciplined 
more in team games than in individual 
games, there must be adequate discipline 
even in individual activities, or else there 
will not be the right mental attitude or 
discipline on the part of the respective 
athlete. 

Orderly 

Another important discipline which must 
come along with every successful athlete is 



the ability to have an orderly and reason- 
ably scheduled activity program. There 
must be adequate time set aside for study, 
for one of the most desirable disciplines is 
the ability to set aside a specified period of 
time and let nothing interfere with this pro- 
gram. This means that the boy must give up 
many activities in which others are engag- 
ing. There have been no great achievements 
made in any area, whether in athletics, sci- 
ence, politics or religion, which have not 
been achieved by sacrifices on the part of 
someone. No athletic season can be success- 
fiul unless there is a desire on the part of 
the participating athletes to make sacrifices 
in order to insure that they have healthy 
bodies, the proper mental attitude, proper 
team spirit and above all the desire to make 
passing grades in their school work. 
Life Lesson 
If every student who goes out for athlet- 
ics would make some real sacrifice in order 
to achieve success for himself or his team, 
then he will learn perhaps one of the most 
important disciplines in life; that is, to 
succeed, effort, discipline, and sacrifice must 
go hand in hand. Only by making sacrifices 
himself can he really appreciate the sacri- 
fices which others are making, whether 
they are for the team or in life situations. 



KAPOS 

(Continued from Page Five) 
recipient, is a first year student at Western 
Kentucky University. Her former sponsor, 
Miss Sara Jo Cardwell of Franklin-Simpson 
High School, reports that Cheri's grades 
were excellent. Keep up the good work, 
Cheri ! 

In order to be eligible for the scholarship 
the applicant must show evidence of out- 
standing academic ability and indicated need 
for financial assistance. The applicant must 
have been a cheerleader for at least two 
years, and the school must be a member in 
good standing in the Kentucky Association 
of Pep Organization Sponsors. 

Scholarship applications may be obtained 
from Mrs. Stella S. Gilb, College of Educa- 
tion, University of Kentucky. You will also 
be able to obtain them at the KAPOS booth 
in Freedom Hall during the state tourna- 
ment. 
Governor Breathitt Declares Sportsmanship Weeic 

Being a good sport is part of being a good 
cheerleader, a good athlete, a good citizen. 
KAPOS doesn't believe that good citizens 
need to be reminded to exemplify good 
sportsmanship. However, it is especially fit- 
ting at tournament time to remind all citi- 
zens that it is a privilege to be able to attend 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MARCH, 1967 



Page Nine 



the games, and that they can contribute to 
the success of the tournament if they will 
abide by the KAPOS Sportsmanship Creed 
proclaimed by Governor Breathitt: 
PROCLAMATION 

Whereas, the Kentucky Association of Pep 
Organization Sponsors upholds all standards 
of good sportsmanship as its aim; and 

Whereas, KAPOS believes that good 
sportsmanship contributes to the foundation 
of the democratic way of life through the 
application of the Golden Rule ; and 

Whereas, KAPOS urges that the ideals of 
good sportsmanship be practiced not only 
during this week but throughout the year; 
and 

Whereas, the Kentucky High School Bas- 
ketball Tournament will be held during this 
week and the majority of Kentuckians will 
F be following the games ; and 

Whereas, good sportsmanship is the obli- 
gation of all citizens, and Kentuckians need 
to be made aware of this responsibility. 

NOW, THEREFORE, I, Edward Breath- 
itt, Governor of the State of Kentucky, do 
hereby proclaim this week as Good Sports- 
manship Week in Kentucky, and urge all 
citizens of this state to uphold all standards 
of good sportsmanship not only during the 
tournament but at all times. 

Attention, Principals! 

Included in the packet that will be given 
to the winner in the regional tournament 
finals will be a letter pertaining to cheer- 
leaders. The letter will contain the informa- 
tion concerning the basis of selecting out- 
standing cheerleader squads, and will re- 
quest that the principal send written confir- 
mation that the cheerleaders of his school 
are being chaperoned by a well qualified, 
school-approved adult. The name of the 
sponsor should be included in this confirma- 
tion letter and given to the KAPOS board 
member at the registration booth in the lob- 
by of the Kentucky Hotel. Sponsors must 
room with or on the same floor with their 
squads. 

Dates to Remember 

March 18— Saturday Morning Coffee. 
KAPOS extends a cordial invitation for ALL 
sponsors and cheerleaders to join them for 
coffee and sweet rolls on Saturday morning 
from 9:30 until 11:00 at the Kentucky Ho- 
tel. Look for the room number on the day's 
bulletin board in the lobby of the hotel. 

August 7-11 — Summer Cheerleader Clinic. 
The Kentucky Cheerleader Association an- 
nounces the Seventh Annual Summer Cheer- 
leader Clinic. The clinic will be held on the 
University of Kentucky Campus. Brochures 
can be obtained at the KAPOS booth or by 



contacting : Mrs. Grace Fragstein, Mrs. Milly 
V. Rodes, or Mrs. Stella S. Gilb. 

NOTE TO ALL ADMINISTRATORS 
KAPOS needs judges, hotel chaperones, and per- 
sonnel to man booths at the hotel and at Freedom 
Hall. This involves at least 12 to 16 people. It Is also 
back-breaking, tiresome work. However, we have many 
dedicated women who have indicated a willingness to 
help share these duties provided they get an "ok" 
from their administrators. Therefore, the KAPOS board 
is seeking your understanding and cooperation, should 
you be asked to release a teacher from her duties to 
help carry on the work that KAPOS is doing to make 
cheerleading a worthwhile educational experience in 
the State of Kentucky. 

Stella S. Gilb 

Executive Secretary-Treasurer 



THE FLYING DUTCHMAN 

(Continued from Page Six) 
suiting burns caused doctors to despair for 
his life. Nobody thought Jim would walk 
again but he is walking and he is also com- 
peting like a champion both in sports and 
his classes. 

A letter just came from Oakley Brown of 
Yosemite saying that Casey County had 
voted dovra a bond issue of $500,000 for a 
gymnasium and community Building. Oak- 
ley has only lived there a few months since 
leaving his recreation post in Jefferson 
County — Give Oakley another year and the 
Dutchman will give odds that a new issue 
will pass. Get those kids a gym, Oakley! 

Attention, Rex Alexander of Murray State 
University! The Dutchman directed a Jef- 
fersontown youngster who migrated to your 
educational institution to look you up but 
he says he can't find you because you don't 
stay long enough in one spot. The lad's 
name is Terry Neill and he's a dandy. Make 
an official of him for that brand new West 
Kentucky Officials Association you are or- 
ganizing. 

Dick Morse, Hade Durbin and John Carl- 
berg are running the South Central Officials 
Association at Elizabethtown. Guy Strong 
will be the speaker at the group's annual 
banquet. The Dutchman can tell you that 
Guy is one of the best after dinner men on 
the food circuit. He's not bad during dinner 
either. 

Ed Mudd is president of the Louisville- 
Falls Cities Basketball Officials Association 
and Bob Gour wields the gavel when the 
whistlers gather at the Southern Kentucky 
Officials Association in Bowling Green. Don 
Metzger and Hubie Louden have done a fine 
job with the Jefferson County Association, 
and Ted Conley is proud of his North East- 
ern Kentucky Officials Association in Ash- 
land. Our prediction is that the Common- 
wealth will soon be blanketed with these 



Page Ten 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MARCH, 1967 



sports officials' associations, and this means 
even better officiating than the schools are 
getting now. 

It's only a short time now until the rules 
makers will be drafting the new basketball 
regulations for 1967-1968. Most people are 
pretty well satisfied with the rules but there 
may be some minor revisions. Many of my 
correspondents ask if the baskets will be 
raised a foot and if a limit will be placed on 
how long a team may hold the ball before it 
is required to shoot. Others want to know if 
a rule will be passed wherein players never 
foul out. Without being psychic, the Dutch- 
man prophesies that none of these will come 
to pass for the 1967-1968 season. 

Here's a closing quotation from Robert 
G. Mood — "We adults spend far too much 
time preparing the path for our youth and 
far too little time preparing our youth for 
the path." 



Techniques of Pitching 

by Rex Chaney and Steve Hamilton 

Editor's Note; Rex Chaney is an Assistant Professor and 
head baseball coach at Morehead State University. Steve Ham- 
ilton, New York Yankee pitcher, is an instructor at the 
University. 

The following is a discussion on proper pitching tech- 
niques. This discussion incorporates ideas which have 
proven to be successful on the high school, college and 
professional level. 

A pitcher's greatest tool is his power to think and 
concentrate. Once he has become skilled in these two 
things the initiation of the following is a mere matter 
of practice and hard work. 

It is important that a pitcher positions himself on 
the mound in a comfortable position with his weight 
well balanced. Where the rules permit, the pitcher 
should straddle the pitching rubber to take the sign 
from the catcher (Figure No. 1). 

Most pitchers are more comfortable taking their 
signs in this manner for one reason; with a man on 
base the possibility of balking is not as great. As the 
set position is taken, the ball is hidden behind the leg. 
Pitchers should not show the ball to the hitter any 
more than is necessary. Ideally, the hitter should nev- 
er see the ball until it is about to be released by the 
pitcher. 

As the windup starts, the weight is sliifted to the 
back foot. The arms are comfortably extended over 
the head and the ball liidden m the glove. At this 
point it becomes important to concentrate on leg lilt 
and hip rotation. Just as a good hitter hits with his 
hips, a good pitcher's success, as far £is the "stuff" 
on the ball and the control, is related directly to hip 
rotation and leg lift. Hanging pitches and lack of con- 
trol are usualUy caused by locking the hips. To as- 
sure good hip rotation the leg should be lifted (right- 
handed pitcher's leg will be pointing in the general 
direction of third base) and the back foot which was 
on the rubber turned to become parallel with and 
touching it (Figure No. 2). Here the pitcher should 
stiU have good balance and stiU be hiding the ball. 
The height of the leg lift must be determined by the 
individual pitcher. Leg lift does two things for the 
pitcher: 



1<©@ 



Figure 1 



Figure 3 



a. gives balance 

b. acts as a pendulum pulling the body through and 
giving added speed to the arm. 

As the pitcher's motion starts toward the plate, the 
rotated hips move toward the plate and the leg is 
brought around and down as the arm comes through. 
Again notice should be given to position. If an imagi- 
nary line were drawn from the middle of the pitching 
rubber to home plate the lead foot would land either 
on it or to the left of it (right-handed pitchers) (Fig- 
ure No. 3). 

This makes the proper rotation of the hips possible 
and you get fuU body movement behind your pitch. It 
should be noted that a right-hand pitcher stepping to 
the right of the imaginary line from the rubber to the 
plate will be throwing across his body and locking his 
hips. 




Figure 2 



Figure 4 



The length of the stride is important for proper exe- 
cution of a pitch. Most pitchers are more guUty of 
overstriding than understriding. When the pitcher over- 
strides he does not get as much on the ball and it 
is sensed, but when the pitcher understrides he tries 
to get more on the ball and consequently the stride 
is lengthened. Once the stride is lengthened tliere is 
a tendency to hit on the heel. This causes a locking 
of the leg and hip and high pitches, hanging pitches 
occur, resulting in loss of control. The stride should 
be such that you land on your toe of your lead foot. 

Very important to any pitcher is proper arm and 
wrist movement. As the pitcher has gone through the 
windup and is maldng the stride, the wrist should be 
cocked and about shoulder level. Up to this point the 
arm is loose and relaxed, not tense. If it is tense a 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MARCH, 1967 



Page Eleven 





Figure 5 



Figure 6 



loss of speed results and also the proper snap cannot 
be put on the curve ball. Think of the arm as a whip 
where it is cocked and then uncocked. This snap of 
the wrist just as the ball is released gives the pitcher 
his speed. 

As the pitcher releases the ball it is against the front 
foot. The follow through should bring the pitcher, still 
on balance, to a position where any ball hit slightly to 
the right or to the left can be fielded. 

Grips among baseball players are controversial. A 
logical approach to type of grips has brought about 
the following discussion: 

A fast ball is held by putting the fingers across the 
seams (where four seams on the ball are rotating) 
(Figure No. 4). The rotation for the overhand pitcher 
should be turning toward the pitcher. The across the 
seams grip will cause the ball to hop as the wind 
catches the four seams (creates an air foil similar to 
the one created by an airplane wing). 

The grip for the curve ball is no different from that 
of the fast ball (Figure No. 5). The difference comes 
in the execution of the pitch. Where the fast ball is 
pushed from the ends of the first two fingers, the 
curve ball roUs off the front side of the hand. In 
expleiining proper techniques for the overhand curve 
ball, ask the pitcher to extend his arm from his shoul- 
der parallel with the floor or ground and then let his 
wrist hang down at the end of his arm. Place a ball in 
his hand while it is in this downward position. With 
the hand stUl in this downward cocked position, have 
the pitcher to bend the elbow and place the ball in a 
position behind the head. The pitch now is executed by 
coming over the top of the head in an arc to the belt 
buckle, letting the ball roll out of the front side of the 
hand. The downward rotation of the ball causes it to 
break. The sharp break is dependent upon amount of 
rotation on the ball. 

The curve ball, when thrown from the side arm or 
three-quarter arm position, demands just as much 
cocking of the wrist and the actually "jerking" into 
the belt buckle as the ball is released to give sharp 
break. Most high school and college boys are satisfied 
with a "lazy" hanging curve which does not take as 
much concentration and effort to throw. 

The slider, which is not advocated if you have a 
good curve because of the tremendous strain on the 
arm, is thrown with a stiff wrist. The snap of the 
wrist is similar to that experienced in throwing a foot- 
ball. The slider gives the appearance of being a fast 
ball but because of the quick snap of the wrist and the 
downward and side rotation of the ball it "slides" 
away from the right-hand hitter (Figure No. 6). 



The biggest fault that young players have in throw- 
ing the curve ball is the casting-type motion where the 
arm is extended during the downward motion and ball 
is released with a slight flick of the wrist. This causes 
it to hang. Common faults which give pitches away: 

a. the same motion is not used for all pitches, 

b. cocking wrist on curve while it is stiU in the 
glove, 

c. holding ball on heel of glove where hitter can 
see it, 

d. windup more rapidly on one pitch than on an- 
other. 

Pitching is a game of thinking, concentration and 
hard work. Incorporate these with a positive attitude 
and a desire to pitch to any hitter, the end result 
should equal success. 



Football In Grade School 
By Henry P. Coppolillo, M. D, 

Editor's Note: Dr. Coppolillo is Assistant Profes- 
sor of Psychiatry, University of Michigan. 

In considering what advice might be use- 
ful to a teacher planning to coach grade 
schoolers in football, the first question that 
arises is whether or not such a program is 
desirable. The issue is not a new one nor 
can it be considered definitely settled. Ob- 
jections such as the possibility of injury, 
the encroachment on study and learning 
time, and the undesirability of stimulating 
aggression in grade school children invari- 
ably emerge. I can only grapple with these 
problems as a child psychiatrist and my con- 
clusions about them as predicated on what 
this discipline understands of normal and 
pathological growth and development of 
personalities. A brief review of some of the 
pertinent concepts may be helpful. 

During his formative years a child is con- 
stantly struggling to reconcile his need to 
express and gratify his internal impulses 
with the demands that his environment 
makes that he behave in a civilized and ma- 
ture fashion. In the earliest years his envi- 
ronment is most often represented by his 
mother or father whereas in later years his 
peer group, his teachers, scout leaders, 
coaches, etc., all represent the environment 
in which he lives. As his desires to express 
an impulse such as aggression, curiosity or 
rebelliousness emerge it can meet a wide 
variety of reactions on the part of the envi- 
ronmental representative (mother, teacher, 
etc.). It can, for example, cause such strong 
negative reactions that the child feels it 
must never express such an impulse again 
lest it incur the wrath and retaliation of the 



Page Twelve THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MARCH, 1967 



SOUTHLAND SPORT SHOP 

348 Southland Drive Phone 277-3977 Lexington, Ky. 
J. A. McFadden, School Rep. 

649 Northside Drive 
Lex., Ky. Phone 299-1635 

IN STOCK— for immediate delivery by UPS 

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Coat Style sweaters 13.95 

6" Chenille letters (plain) 2-3 weeks 1.35 

J & J Speed Pack tape 17.95 

Adidas Track shoes & Flats 

Knit Baseball Uniforms 14.95 

#68 Baseballs (excellent for practice) 13.95 dz. 

#95 Official league baseballs 19.95 dz. 

Lou. Slugger bats # Adirondack "Pro" Bats 

Nylon warmup jackets — 5 colors 5.95 

Trophies — in stock in all price ranges 

Engraved in our store for quick delivery 

Most all baseball and track items in stock for 
quick shipment 

Collect calls accepted on all orders 

SOUTHLAND SPORT SHOP 

G«ne Stokley Dick Wallace 



adult. It is useful to remember here that Among the many awards this man has 

since children frequently have trouble dis- earned are the Presidency of the Americar 

tinguishing between the actual commission Football Coaches Association in 1955-56, tht 

of an act and the desire to commit the act; Los Angeles Times' Coach of the Yeai 

the child may well have to inhibit not only Award in 1946, The Alonzo Stagg Award 

the behavior but also thoughts about the in 1961, and an honorary life membership 

forbidden act. In this way an impulse be- in the American Football Coaches Associa- 

comes hidden, inhibited, and no longer avail- tion in 1965. 

able to the youngsters' conscious control. ^^ ^^ jij^j^j football and baseball player, 

Among the other ways that adults can ^s a small-college coach, as a line assistant 

respond to an impulsive act of a child is to Bob Zuppke, and as head coach at his alms 

simply to inhibit the mode that the impulse mater, Mr. Eliot has stuck firmly to his 

is being expressed and at the same time of- dedicated assignment in life, "a builder oi 

fer the child an alternative, and more so- fine men." 

cially acceptable mode of discharging the ,t- i-i i i i • i • i,- 

impulse. In this way not only has the im- ^ His solid background m coaching, his 

pulse not been massively inhibited but the dynamic speaking ability, his great feeling 

child acquires a new skill with which to for and popularity ^ylth persons from everj 

adapt to the world. '^^l^ °^ ^^^®' ^^' ®^"^P '^™ perfectly for his 

(Continued in April ATHLETE) assignment. 



ANNUAL MEETING SPEAKER 



He is a man w^ho will take time from s 

,^ ^. , . _ „ , busy schedule to thank a high school boy for 

(Continued from Page One) ^^ ^^.^j^ ^^ ^.^ .^ ^^^ ^^^^^ p^p^^^ ^^^ ^ 

then was promoted to the head coaching man who receives fan mail from the Arctic 

job. He also served as baseball coach, and In Circle to Tokyo, Japan. Mr. Eliot is a mar 

both sports his teams compiled impressive who will give you "Something to Think 

records. About." 



IF YOU ARE NOT USING OUR STUDENT COVERAGE 
NOW, A FEW MINUTES SPENT IN COMPLETING AND 
COMPARING THE CHART BELOW WILL SHOW 
WHETHER YOU SHOULD CONSIDER OUR POLICY 
FOR THE COMING YEAR. 



PRESENT OUR 
POLICY POLICY 



1. Accident Medical Expense Benefit - Maximum 

2. Lini't for calls at doctor's office? 

3. Limit for X-rays or negative X-rays? 

4. Limit for Dental Expense, per tooth? 

5. Scheduled Surgery Benefits? 

6. Private Tutoring Benefit? 

7. Benefits payable regardless of other insurance? 

8. Coverage available on 24-hour basis? 

9. Available to employees? 

10. Does policy cover Athletics, except Football? 

11. Is Football Coverage available? 

12. Is policy approved by KHSAA? 

13. By Kentucky High School Football Coaches Ass'n? 

14. Is Claim Service prompt and is an interest shown 
in your special problems? 



$8,000 

NO 

NO 

NO 

NO 

YES 

YES 

YES 

YES 

YES 

YES 

YES 

YES 

YES 



NOTE: Items 2 through 5 provide for payment of reasonable 
and customary charges for services rendered. 

IF YOU WOULD LIKE TO KNOW MORE ABOUT THESE 
COVERAGES, WE WILL BE HAPPY TO CALL ON YOU. 
JUST LET US KNOW. 



^Ae KUu^de4i. Qa4nfiaiUf> genekal agent 



W. E. KINGSLEY 



121-123 LAFAYETTE AVHWE 
P. O. BOX 7100 



J. E. MoGREARY, Mgr. 
Life Department 

LEXINGTON, KY. 40502 



CHARLES C. PRICE 

PH(ME 254-4095 



We SHipTPie DaV You BuV" 
HUNTS ATHLETIC GOODS CO, Inc. 

PHONE CH 7-1941 

MAYFIELD, KENTUCKY 

IT'S PLAY TIME 

Outdoor playground programs will be conducted in many schools during 
summer months. 

Our stock is complete on all types of playground and play time equipment. 
Try our "WE SHIP THE DAY YOU BUY" service on: 

Basketballs 

Basketball goals 
Volleyballs 

Volleyball nets and posts 

Playground balls of all sizes 
Softballs and Softball bats 

Badminton racquets and shuttlecocks 
Nets and complete badminton sets 

Regulation horseshoes in steel and rubber 
Shuffleboard sets and supplies 
Tennis racquets, nets and balls 

If you plan to have baseball in connection with your recreation program, 
we have a complete stock of uniforms, shoes, bats, balls and gloves in 
Little League, Babe Ruth League and regulation sizes. 

Please write or call for complete information and prices, and our sales- 
men will be glad to call or give you any information and assistance you 
may need. 

Our salesmen have been out since January 1st with the 1966-1967 Football 
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Phone: Louisville, Ky. 
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Bill Farmer, C. A. Byrn, Jr. 




EARLINGTON HIGH SCHOOL BASKETBALL 
TEAM K.H.S.A.A. CHAMPION— 1967 




(Left- to Right) Front Row: Cheerleaders Rita Clayton, Rosemary Ezell, Debbie Over- 
ton, Margaret Jordan, Jo Ann Tucl<er. Second Row: Ass't Coach David Jenldns, Statistician 
John Jordan, Lonnle Burgett, Gregg Martin, Larry Martin, Kenneth Jagoe, Arthur Johnson, 
Statistician Mike Wyatt, Coach Bob Fox. Third Row: Mgr. Tommy Todd, Alvin Moore, Bob 
Leavell, Tyrone Hopson, Jim Hicl(s, Justin Sharp, Charles Smith, Calvin Moore, Mgr. 
Bobby Garland. 

District Tournament Games Won Regional Tournament Games Won 

Earllngton 72-40 West Hopkins Eariington .87-68, Hopkinsvllle 

Earlington 77-44 Madisonville Eariington 67-48... Christian County 

Eariington 106-53 Providence 







Official Organ of the 

KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION 

April, 1967 




mu-. 



COVINGTON CATHOLIC— RUNNER-UP 
1967 STATE BASKETBALL TOURNAMENT 




(Left to Right) Front Row; Mgr. Jack Bogaczyk, Don Droege. Jim Cooper, Larry McMillin, Joe Fritz, Mike 
Donovan, Mgr. Mike Niehans. Second Row: Ath. Dir. Jack Payne, Dale Overman, Joe Kreimberg, Randy Noll, 
Coach "Mote" Hils. Tony Kreimborg-, George Schloemer, Dick Berger. Ass't Coach "Hep" Cronin, 



BREATHITT COUNTY— SEMI-FINALIST 
1967 STATE BASKETBALL TOURNAMENT 




(Left to Righti Front Row: Mgr. Ernie Clemmons, Coach Fairce Woods, Mgr. Don Combs. Second Row: Go- 
ley Salyers, Fred Combs, Gary Elam, Eugene Cundiff. La rry Noble, Charles Turner, Sam Sizemore, B. G. Lovins. 
Chester Mcintosh), James Morris. Howard Hays. 



The Kentucky High School Athlete 

Official Organ of the 
Kentucky High School Athletic Association 



VOL. XXTX— NO. 9 



APRIL, 1987 



$1.00 Per Year 



NEWLY ELECTED BOARD MEMBERS 




Alvin Almond 



Don Davis 



Athielic Director Alvin Almond of the University 
High School, Bowling Green, and Assistant Superin- 
tendent Don Davis of the Kenton County Schools, In- 
dependence, will represent Sections 2 and 5 respec- 
tively on the Board of Control for a four-year period, 
beginning July 1, 1967. Mr. Davis will begin his 
second term as a Board member. 

AI Almond is a graduate of Bowling Green High 
School and Western Kentucky University, having re- 
ceived the B. S. degree in 1950 and the M. A. in 1952. 
While at Western, he served as manager of the Hill- 
toppers basketball team. His career as coach and 
teacher began in 1950, when he accepted a position at 
the Alvaton High School, where he remained until 1956. 
In that year he became supervising teacher of Physical 
Education and coach at College High School where he 
teaches Physical Education and coaches the golf team. 

An active member of the Cumberland Presbyterian 
Church, Mr. Almond has served as Sunday School 
superintendent and is now an assistant teacher. He 
has served in various capacities in the Bowling Green 
Optimist Club of which he has been a member for 
eleven years. His professional memberships include the 
following organizations: K.E.A., N.E.A., A.A.H.P.E.R., 
T.D.E.A., and Phi Delta Kappa. 

Mr. Davis, a graduate of the Dayton High School, 
holds degrees from Cincinnati and St. Xavier Univer- 
sities. A college letterman in football, basketball, and 
baseball, he has coached these sports in high school 
as well as track and swimming. 

Mr. Davis is affiliated with numerous professional 
educational organizations. He is a Past President of the 
Bellevue Rotary Club, a charter member of the Camp- 
bell County Youth Advisory Committee, and a Past 
Chairman of the Bellevue Youth Advisory Com- 
mittee. He was in the service during the 1941-46 
period, being discharged with the rank of First 
Lieutenant in the Coast Artillery Anti-Aircraft. Since 
that time teaching and coaching assignments have been 
at Wellston (Ohio) High School, Dayton High School, 
and Holmes High School. From 1957 to 1962 Mr. Davis 
was Principal of the Bellevue High School, and he was 



named Assistant Superintendent of Kenton County 
Schools in 1962. He is married to the former Mary 
Louise Byland. They have four children, one boy and 
three girls. 



1967 Annual Meeting 

This issue of the ATHLETE went to press just prior 
to the time of the annual meeting of the Association. 
The business meeting of the K.H.S.A.A. was scheduled 
to be held on Thursday, April 13, at 3:00 p.m., in the 
Terrace Room of the Kentucky Hotel, Louisville. The 
dinner meeting was to follow at 6:00 p.m., and was to 
be held in the Crystal Ballroom of the Brown Hotel. 

As provided in Article IX, Section 1, of the 
K.H.S.A.A. Constitution, the following changes in the 
Constitution and By-Laws were to be acted upon by 
the Delegate Assembly: 

PROPOSAL I 

The Board of Control proposes that By-Law 29, Sec- 
tion 1, be amended to read as follows: "Any person 
who officiates in a football, basketball or baseball 
game between member schools of the Association must 
be registered with the Commissioner and must have 
his official card indicating registration." 
PROPOSAL II 

The Board of Control proposes a new By-Law to 
read as follows: "A team may enter only one county, 
conference, or invitational tournament during the regu- 
lar basketball season." 

PROPOSAL III 

The Board of Control pro^'ises that Article IV-3-d-9 
of the Constitution be amended to read as follows: 
"Have authority to set the fees for officials in district 
and regional basketball tournaments." 
PROPOSAL IV 

Prin. Edwin K. Burton (Newport) proposes that the 
fallowing be substituted for By-Law 4, Age, to take 
effect as of August 1, 1968: "AH pupils shall become 
ineligible on and alter their nineteenth birthday with 
the following exceptions: A. If the age of nineteen is 
attained on or after September 1, the pupil shall be 
eligible to compete through the fall sports season; B. 
If the age of nineteen is attained on or after Novem- 
ber 1, the pupil shall be eligible to compete through 
the winter sports season; C. If the age of nineteen is 
attained on or after March 1, the pupil shall be eligi- 
ble to compete through the spring sports season. For 
the application of this rule, the respective sports sea- 
sons are defined as follows: A. Fall Sports Season — 
Football, Cross Country, September 1 through Novem- 
ber 30; B. Winter Sports Season— Basketball, Wres- 
tling, Swimming, Gymnastics, November 1 through 
March 31; C. Spring Sports Season — Baseball, Track, 
Golf, Tennis, March 1 through June 30." 
PROPOSAL V 

Prin. Patrick E. Napier (Madison) proposes that a 
new Section be added to By-Law 1 to read as follows: 
"Each student whose name appears on the high school 
eligibility list shall have a copy of his birth certificate 
on file in the principal's office." 

(Continued on Page Nine) 



\ 



Page Two 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR .APRIL, 196T 



APRIL. 1967 



VOL. XXIX— NO. 9 Bob Gour, Western Ky. University, Bowling Green, 



Published monthly, except June and July, by the Kentuck) 

High School Athletic Association 

Office of Publication. Lexington. Ky. 40501 

Second class postage paid at Lexington. Kentucky. 

editor THEO. A. SANFORL 

Assistant Editor J. B. MANSFIELL 

Lexington. Ky. 
BOARD OF CONTROL 

President Sherman Gish (1963-67). GreenyilU 

Vice-President Don Davis (1963-67). Independence 

Directors — Morton Combs (1964-68), Carr Creek; Ralph U 
Dorsey (1966-70), Horse Cave: Preston Holland (1965-69). 
Murray; Don R. Rawlings (1965-69), Danyille; Foster .> 
Sanders (1966-70), LouisTillc; Oran C. Teater (1964-68,. 
Paintsville. 

Subscription Rate . $1.90 Per Year 

^lom the Comtnissionei s Office 



REPORTS PAST DUE 

1. 1966-67 Basketball Participation List 
(Eligibility) 

2. School's Report on Basketball Officials 

3. Official's Report on Schools (Basket- 
ball) 



Attention, Officials! 

In recent years, there have been numerous instances 
in which registered officials, for some reason unable 
or unwilling to carry out the terms of cont' acls with 
K.H.S.A.A. member schools to vvork athletic contests, 
have sent substitutes to wo: k the games involved. 
Sometimes these ."ubstitutions have been made with 
the knowledge and approval of the game managers, 
but many times this has not been true. 

K.H.S.A.A. By-Law 23 provides that there shall be 
an agreement on officials between the representatives 
of the two schools involved in any game. The game 
manager who allows a substitution without getting the 
approval of the visiting school coach is in violation of 
the By-Law mentioned, and the official who sends a 
substitute without getting the approval of both coaches 
or game managers is in violation of his contract. A 
fine and/or possible suspension from the Officials' Di- 
vision of the K.H.S.A.A. may be the end result for a 
registered official who does not abide by the terms of 
the contract which he has with an Association mem- 
ber school. 

If an official finds it impossible to work a game for 
which he is contracted, he should file a written state- 
ment with the principal of the home school, giving 
reasons for the cause of the contract cancellation. 
This statement should be sent at least two weeks 
(earUer if possible) prior to the time of the game in 
order that the representatives of the two schools may 
have time to secure a substitute official "at least ten 
days before the contest." as pro'.'ided in By-Law 23. 



Baseball Arsa Leaders 
K.H.S.A.A. -trained area representatives in baseball, 
who are currently conducting clinics for coaches and 
officials and who are assisting with registration of new 
officials, are rendering a fine service to the Associa- 
tion. The names and addresses of these men, with the 
residence and business "^hone numbers (residence num- 
bers given first), are as follows; 
W. P. "Dub" Russell. Alurray, 492-8231, 753-5125 
Oetus Hubbs, Hopkinsville, 885-8578, 9S6-3384 
Al Giordano, Princeton, 365-5680, 365-5^5 
Jerry Kimmel, Beechmc-t, 476-2656, 476-2656 



Shelby Winfrey, Campbellsville, 465-8392, 465-8392 
Eddie Eyl, Jr.. 2252 Bradford Dr., Louisville, 452-1001 
Roy Cline, 1194 Lincoln Ave., Louisville, 637-8249 
James Kidwell, 1112 Parkway, Covington, 581-9 
Harry Stephenson, Vou. navvthorne Dr., Lexington, 

299-1757, 255-6861 ext. 284 
Bunny Davis, Danville, 236-2606, 236-2606 
Merritt D. Penner, Jr., Route 4, Box 739, Manchester, 

598-3711 
Howard Wiley, 199 Bridge St., Paintsville, 789-5546, 

789-3663 
Dale Griffith, 2334-E Jepson St., Ashland, 324-2497, 

324-1155, ext. 276 



Supplementary List Of 

Registered Baseball Officials 

(Lis} Compiled April 1] 

If one telephone number is given for an official listed, it 
is the_ home phone unless otherwise designated. If two numbers 
are given, the first number is that of the home phone. 

Bell, Leonard. Route 2, Hodgenville, 358-4168. 358-3196 
iiottom. Lawrence W., K. A. House, Georgetown, 863-2882 
Brock. Lavone Edward. Stoney Fork, 337-3271, 337-3271 
Butner, Billy M., Route 2, Lancaster, 792-3503, 792-3503 
Cappel, William P., 822 Perry St., Covington. 431-0232, 

721-8070 
Colvin, Dorce A., 2408 Broadway. Catlettsburg, 739-5715 
Crager. Bobby P., South Lake Drive, Prestonsburg, 886-3682, 

886-2467 
Dean, Jerry W., McKee, 287-3468, 287-3501 
Dennison. James, 1825 James David Court, Owensboro 
Dryden. Wallace Lee, 163 E. Maxwell, Lexington, 252-2733, 

254-4017 
Earle. Herschel G., Route 2. Berry, 234-5842 
Engle. William Cyrus, Box 46, Hindman, 785-5543 
Estep. Bobby D.. Fuget. 265-2701 

Gaines. Curtis, 29 Maple St., Henderson, VA 6-9933, VA 7-98D1 
Gibson. Harvey E., Route 8, 13th Garth St., Clarksville, 

Tenn., 645-5547, 798-3320 
Glass, Prank, Jr., 2004 Deauville Drive, Lexington, 255-1798 
Handley. Samuel P., Hodgenville. 358-3196 (Bus.) 
Hardin, Stanley. 3510 Newburg Rd.. Louisville. 451-8612 
Harper, Robie, P. O. Box 51. Beechmont, 476-8084. 476-2630 
Hinkley, Dale, Pleasureville. 878-5923 
Hinton. Noah Spears, Jr., P. O. Box 981, Pikeville, 437-6144, 

639-2832 
Jones. James David. Route 6. Franklin. 586-6569, 586-5251 
Kennedy. LaVelton, P. O. Box 1160. Owensboro. 683-7048 
King. David Loran, 1191-C Elm'dale, Paducah, 444-6703, 

554-2757 
Kircher. Dennis W., 26 E. 43rd St., Covington, 581-8458, Lex- 
ington 252-1130 
Kuhl, Lawrence, Houser Lane, London. 864-6235. 864-6240 
Lamb, Paul. 427 Carlisle Ave., Lexington. 255-4126, 255-6666 
Landers. John P., 32 Charlemagne, Clarksville, Tenn., 647-2656, 

798-3320 
Logsdon. Charles William, 104 Hurstborne Ave.. Bardstown, 

348-9419 
Marshall. Barry J., 250 Mt. Tabor Rd., Lexington. 266-3482, 

255-5661 
McKinney. Adelle P.. 7829-B Estrada. Ft. Knox 
Nash. Richard Clark. 725 Walnut Park Dr.. Owensboro, 683-5871 
Nash. Robert E.. 4107 Pixley Way, Louisville, 969-5603, 969-5603 
Newton, Jerry L.. Box 244, La Center, 665-9750, 443-7337 
Padgett. R. K.. 2022 College St. Somerset 
Palko, Edward T., 126 Holmes, Apt. 1, Frankfort 
Price, James E.. Liberty 
Ray. Kendall H.. 2023 Delia Drive. Clarksville, Tenn., 647-7568, 

798-3314 
Robbins. Michael J., 778 Jimae Drive, Independence, 356-2209, 

291-1148 
Roller. Otis C. 808 Chamberv Drive. Louisville, 895-6356. 

587-1121 ext. 309 
Romanello. Daniel J.. 4420 Floral Ave.. Norwood, Ohio, 731-8033, 

632-2728 
Shaw. Earl, 121 Hagan Court. Lancaster, 792-2370. 548-220S 
Singleton. Jim, 9017 Cinderella Lane, Louisville, 964-0090, 

366-9561 ext. 531 
Smith, Willard N., 904 Rose Crest, Box 23, Campbellsville, 

465-5339. 465-4191 
Thomas. Bill, 3418 Burrell Drive, Louisville, 447-7521 
Thornton, Daniel A., 119 Stacker Drive, Clarksville. Tenn., 

647-2234 
Tomerlin, Allen, 3251 Poplarview Drive, Louisville. 447-4861 
Treadwav. Billy T., 221A Central Hall, Western Ky. Univ., 

Bowling Green 745-2167. Louisville 895-8917 
Urlage. Richard. 822 Highland Ave.. Ft. Thomas, 441-5513, 

471-8120 
White. Thomas R.. 7703 Chet Lane, Louisville, 366-9720, 

366-9561 ext. 293 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR APRIL, 1967 



Page Three 



LOUISVILLE CENTRAL— SEMI-FINALIST 
1967 STATE BASKETBALL TOURNAMENT 






^«.^> /Wm « J , 1,1/ - ^£ 



(Left to R.ght) Front Row: Mack Williams. Darryl Gibson, .lohn Williams, Ernest Marshall, Otto Petty. Sec- 
ond Row: Vernon Bryant, Leonard Watkins, Lee Gray, Robert Siief field, Richard Canlfield, Glenn Montgomery* 
Dennis Terrell, Coach Robert Graves. Third Row: Ass't Coach James Gordon, Mgr. Cooper, Melvin Brooks, Marcus 
Hayes, Ben Watkins, Levi Waters, Alfonzo O'Bannon, Ronald King, Mgr. Hyatt, 



Wilson, H. G., 205 N. Maple St., Somerset 

Yewell, Morgan Radcliffe, Jr., 475 Flamingo Ave., Frankfort. 

876-2745, 252-5535 
Zirnheld, Leonard, 9105 Bluelick Road, Louisville, 969-5925 



MINUTES OF BOARD MEETING 

The Board of Control of the Kentucky High School 
Athletic Association met at the Kentucky Hotel, Louis- 
ville, on Friday morning, March 17, 1967. The meet- 
ing was called to order by President Sherman Gish at 
9:15, with all Board members and Commissioner Theo. 
A. Sanford present. The invocation was given by Fos- 
ter J. Sanders. 

Don R. Rawlings moved, seconded by Don Davis, 
that the reading of the minutes of the January 21st 
meeting be waived since the members of the Board 
had received copies of these minutes. The motion was 
carried unanimously. 

The Commissioner reported the results of the recent 
balloting for Board membership in Sections 2 and 5. 
Don Davis was unopposed in Section 5. He received 
36 vo!:es. The balloting in Section 2 was as foUows: 
.41vin Almond. 33; Sherman Gish, 18. 

After a general discussion of Board of Control pro- 
posals, Oran C. Teater moved, seconded by Don 
Davis, that the following proposals be presented to the 
Delegate Arsembly, after which the motion was car- 
ried unanimously: 

PROPOSAL I— The Board of Control proposes that 
By-Law 29, Section 1, be amended to read as follows: 
"Any person who officiates in a football, basketball or 
baseball game between member schools of the Asso- 
ciation must be registered with the Commissioner and 
must have his official card indicating registration." 

PROPOSAL II— The Board of Control proposes a new 
By-Law to read as follows: "A team may enter only 
one county, conference, or invitational tournament dur- 



ing the regular basketball season." 

PROPOSAL III— The Board of Control proposes that 
.\rticle IV-3-d-9 of the Constitution be amended to read 
as follows: "Have authority to set the fees for officials 
in district and regional basketball tournaments." 

Ralph C. Dorsey moved, seconded by Don R. Raw- 
lings, that all bills of the Association for the period 
beginning January 1, 1967, and ending February 28, 
1967, be allowed. The motion was carried unani- 
mously. 

There being no further business, the meeting 
adjourned. 



New Films 



The films listed below are in the Film Library of tht Uni- 
versity of Kentucky College of Education. The rental prices 
shown do not apply to schools which ase one of the special 
subscriptions service plans, offered by the Bureau of Audio- 
Visual Materials. 

WRESTLING OFFICIATING ILLUSTRATED, j-s-c-a, 
2 reels, color, $1.00 

Interpretations given in Wrestling Officiating Illus- 
trated have been made by the National Federation 
members of the Joint Rules Committee. The film cov- 
ers takedowns, reversals, escapes, leaving the mat, 
stalling, scoring and illegal holds such as body slam, 
bar ann, full nelson and chicken wing. Guidelines for 
officiating and interpreting the rules are provided. In 
all there are sixty separate scenes of wrestling. This 
film will provide the much needed guidance and prop- 
er interpretations for interscholastic competition. 
BASEBALL ALL-STAR GAME OF 1966, j-s-c-a, 2 reels 
(20 Min.), color, $1.00 

The greats of the National League battle the stars 
of the American League in the new 26 million dollar 



Page Four 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR APRIL, 1967 



Busch Stadium at St. Louis. The National League won 
the game in the tenth inning as Ned MeCarver scored 
on a single bj' Maury Wills. The American League 
scored in the second inning and the National League 
tied it in the fourth. Close-ups of the stars are shown 
as they warm up for each game. 

V/ORLD SERIES OF 1966. e-j-s-c-a. 4 reels, (44 Min.), 
color, $1.00 
The Baltimoi'e Orioles amazed the sports world as 
they defeated the Los Angeles Dodgers in four 
straight games to win the world championship. Even 
the great Sandy Koufa.\ and Don Drysdale could not 
silence the bats of Frank Robinson and Brooks Robin- 
son. They hit back-to-back home runs the first time at 
bat. Baltimore's young pitchers blanked tlie Dodgers 
in the second and third games. The film shows the 
action plays in all four games. 



Football In Grade School 

By Henry P. Coppolillo, M. D. 

Editor's No}e: Dr. Coppolillo is Assistant Profes- 
sor of Psychiatry, University of Michigan. 

(Continued from March ATHLETE) 

An example may help to clarify this con- 
cept. Johnny, age four, in a burst of exuber- 
ant aggression takes a flying start from 
across the room and dives headlong into fa- 
ther's midriff. When father regains his ca- 
pacity to react he may (as mentioned 
above) be so overwhelmed by his distaste 
for expressions of aggression that he may, 
either by attitude or word, indicate great 
disapproval for Johnny's act. If the threat 
in the disapproval is great enough (and to 
a child of four the world can seem very 
threatening at times) Johnny decides that 
it is in his best interests to inhibit such ex- 
pressions of aggression. Enough experiences 
of this kind may produce the quiet, with- 
drawn, timid child, who seems almost inca- 
pable of mustering up enough gumption to 
carry on the process of daily living. 

On the other hand another father, intui- 
tively recognizing his child's need to express 
and discharge aggression, may say, "Hey! 
Wait a minute ! You can't go ai'ound but- 
ting people. You want to be a tough guy? 
O.K. Let's wrestle." At a later date father 
may sense that the child is now ready to 
further refine and socialize his mode of ex- 
pressing this aggression and introduce a 
game of playing catch. This second mode of 
helping a child to inhibit his aggressive 
tendencies not only introduces a new skill to 
the child, but communicates to him that the 
aggressive impulse per se is not undesirable 
or bad. It needs only be expressed in a so- 
cially acceptable way. When this socially ac- 
ceptable way is learned from the father and 
becomes a part of the repertory of talents 



we may say that the process has contributed 
to an identification with the father. 

How are these concepts applicable to 
coaches? We must remember that in our 
culture the child, practically until adoles- 
cence, lives in a matriarchal society. In his 
preschool years he is groomed and taught 
almost exclusively by mother. When he 
starts school the greater number of his 
teachers are women. His contacts with his 
father occur, unfortunately, only when fa- 
ther's work, Saturday golf game, and Sun- 
day TV schedule permit them to occur. As 
a result the "identifications" that permit a 
child to channel his impulses into socially 
acceptable modes may be strongly feminine. 
It is clear that regular contact with a male 
who can say in word or attitude to the child, 
"Look, there's another way to handle your 
problems," is highly desirable. 

In lower socio-economic groups this matri- 
archal emphasis is even more pronounced. 
Because of the instability of the family, or 
because of the enormous amounts of time 
the fathers in these families must spend at 
work in order to make ends meet, the chil- 
dren are frequently raised without benefit 
of adequate masculine identifications. It is 
my conviction that one of the principal rea- 
sons for some of the "tough guy" swagger- 
ing and sometimes delinquency that we see 
in young males in the lower socio-economic 
classes are reactions against these feminine 
identifications. How helpful it would have 
been if such a youngster during his grade 
school days could have had a relationship 
that might have taught him by living out 
the demonstration that masculinity is not 
brutality and that control of aggression is 
not "sissy." 

Regarding the possibility of injury, I can- 
not help but feel that supervised sport has 
considerably less risk in it than the sand lot 
games that youngsters play; and when one 
thinks of some of the unsupervised activities 
that grade school youngsters undertake, the 
gridiron begins to look like a pretty safe 
place. 

The question of stimulating competitive- 
ness in children of this age frequently 
arises. It is indeed true that a child playing 
football will feel competitive. He has no 
business playing if he does not. But it is 
equally true that in certain situations in th" 
game he will be called upon to put aside his 
competitive spirit for the good of the team. 
A child who will play only if he can carry 
the ball every play quickly learns that shar- 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR APRIL. 1967 



Page Five 



ing the spotlight is a fact of life. Once more 
then we see that the sport channels and 
modulates the competitive impulse and does 
not simply stimulate or indulge it. 

Finally, some consideration for the 
coaches are in order. A grade school boy 
obviously does not have the stability and 
maturity of a high school youngster. There 
may be times when the coach will be called 
upon to act as much more than a coach. He 
may have to wipe tears, answer questions, 
and solve personal problems. Flexibility and 
patience is the price one must pay for a 
child's love and respect. We all know it is 
worth it. 

The grade school child is much more vul- 
nerable to derision than his older high 
school brothers. Frequently with older boys 
derision is used to incite desire and drive. I 
would strongly recommend against this with 
grade school youngsters. Lowered self- 
esteem is corrosive for them. If discipline is 
necessary, a swat on his posterior parts is 
tolerated better, by far, by the youngster 
than derision. 

For children of grade school age it is 
much more difficult to appreciate realistic 
factors in a situation than it is for adoles- 
cents. The inept or unskilled child finds it 
difficult to comprehend that his lack of skill 
may be a reason for not being used in a 
game. Here again, the coaches' empathy and 
compassion must be keener than it need be 
with older children. Find some way of using 
the inept youngster. I would go so far as to 
say that the sensitive and skilled coach can 
be of enormous help even to the child with 
a physical handicap (such as a victim of 
cerebral palsy) by finding a spot for him as 
equipment manager or statistics keeper or 
spotter. Here, however, be careful of con- 
descension or pity. Kids cannot use either of 
these attitudes. What they can use is our 
skill and attention in finding a way of util- 
izing the healthy assets even severely dam- 
aged children possess. 

One last word regarding the "star." When 
we see a particularly talented youngster, so 
many visions occur to us of how gratifying 
such talents can be. How many of us have 
relived our college days endowed with the 
skills of the youngster we are watching! Be 
careful ! He may want to become a violinist. 
Do not let your chagrin show. Make sure the 
ambition to become a star is his, not yours. 
And by the way — I would have no objection 
to your passing this last on to parents. 



In Memoriam 




EWELL E. WADDELL 

Ewell E. Waddell. Superintendent of Fort Thomas 
City Schools, suffered a fatal heai't attack in his home 
on March 22. He was 59. 

A native of Crittenden County, Mr. Waddell was 
i;raduated from Marion High School, received his 
A. B. degree from Western Kentucky University, Bowl- 
ing Green, in 1934. and his master's degree in educa- 
tion from Xavier University, Cincinnati, in June, 1957. 
He became football coach and social studies teacher at 
Ludlow High School in 1934 and remained there until 
1942 when he transferred to Highlands High School, 
Fort Thomas, with similar duties which he held until 
1953. 

During Mr. Waddell's tenure as coach, Highlands 
High School won 91 games and lost 37. His 1943 foot- 
ball team won the state championship. In the spring 
of 1955, about 200 former Highlands High lettermen 
plus 100 former athletes and friends of Mr. WaddeU 
held a testimonial dinner in his honor and presented 
to him a plaque that stressed his coaching accom- 
plisliments. 

Mr. Waddell was named assistant superintendent in 
1955 and superintendent in 1956. He was a member of 
the audit conmiittee of the State Department of Edu- 
cation and of si.x other educational groups. 

Mr. Waddell is survived by his wife, Mrs. Sarah 
Dean Waddell, also a graduate of Marion High School; 
three sons, Donald (Fort Thomas), WilUam (Richmond, 
Va.), and Philhp, at home, a high school senior; a 
brother, James O. Waddell (Hopkinsville), and four 
grandchildren. 

Chairman Robert A. Raisbeck of the Fort Thomas 
Board of Education sent a memorial tribute honoring 
Mr. Waddell to to all school employees. He said: 

"Seldom have the citizens of Fort Thomas been more 
greatly shocked or thrown into deeper gloom than this 
morning when news came that Mr. Waddell had a fatal 
heart attack. 

"Kind, patient and faithful to his task, Mr. WaddeU 
served efficiently and well as teacher, coach and in 
the last 11 years as superintendent of schools. 

"Members of the board of education have lost a 
valued friend and employee, the faculty and entire 
staff a loyal counselor, the school children a devoted 
friend and the family a loving husband and father." 



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Page Eight 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR APRIL, 1967 



The Flying Dutchman 

Nelson Hornbeck of Fairdale has been named "Mr. 
Recreation of Kentucky" for 1967 by the Jefferson 
County Recreation Youth Association. The "iVIr. Rec- 
reation" awards were initiated by the youth association 
in 1953 and go to Kentuckians whom the youngsters 
feel have done the most to promote parks and recrea- 
tion each succeeding year. The first "Mr. Recreation 
of Kentucky" was IVIax Sanders of Valley Station, in 
1936 Governor Lawrence Wetherby was the winner, 
Henry Wai-d got it in 1961, Ted Sanford in 1962. In 
1964 Judge Marlow W. Cook was "Mr. Recreation of 
Kentucky" because of his strong support of park and 
recreation developments. 

Now in 1967 popular, hard-working Nelson Hornbeck, 
who was born in Fairdale 75 years ago, receives the 
handsome winner's plaque. Nelson moved a few years 
ago with his wife, "Miss Nelhe." inside Louisville's 
city limits, but Fairdale will always claim him and he 
claims Fairdale. Few leaders have left footprints in 
the sands of time as large as "Mr. Recreation of 
1967." 

Charlie Blake, principal of Fairdale High School in 
1930, recalls "Nels" and "Miss Nellie" as enthusiastic 
volunteer workers whenever the community's good was 
involved. 

The Coimty Recreation Youth Association named this 
man because he has served as a member, and in 
later years as chairman, of the Jefferson County 
Playground and Recreation Board for the past seven- 
teen years. Good Housekeeping magazine hailed Nel- 
son Hornbeck in a coast to coast story when he, Char- 
lie Blake, Eddie Johnstone, Lennie Farmer and BiU 
Schultz organized Fairdale, the poorest community in 
Jefferson County, and built the first "Playtorium" in 
the nation in 1949. Take a tour of Jefferson County's 
Rainbow Park System sometime and a look at the 118 
playgrounds scattered all over and then salute Nelson 
Hornbeck, "Mr. Recreation of Kentucky," for a life- 
time of sei-vice to the children he and "IVIiss NeUie" 
love. 

The Dutcimian doffs his fedora to Commissioner 
Ted Sanford and his good "right arm," Joe Billy 
Mansfield, for a superb job of handling the biggest 
show Louisville has ever had in tiiis 1967 State High 
School Basketball Tournament. 

It never ceases to amaze out-of-staters at the num- 
ber of Kentuckians who pitch in on a volunteer basis 
to give the Commissioner all the help and cooperation 
he needs to get the great big job done. The Dutchman 
saw Edgar McNabb hustling around, Butoh CharmoU 
working all over Freedom Hall, Raymond Wimberg 
doing anytiiing necessary, Sam Pollack working on the 
scorebook, and dozens of others, all of whom were 
cogs in the best organized team this Dutchman has 
ever seen. Lou Benn and his Louisville Chamber of 
Commerce Hospitality Committee impressed every 
Kentuckian present. 

History must record that the officials at this year's 
state tournament did themselves proud. It was a hard 
meet to officiate because all-court presses seemed to 
be the "order of the day" and these occasion more 
contact and more fouls. With two teams using the 
press in the same game, it's doubly hard for game 
officials to look good. This Dutchman heard the crowd 
"boo" loudly decisions made correctly and again 
applaud the officials for making the calls according to 
the rules and not in ratio to the influence of noise from 
the fans. Courageous Jerry Kimmel gets the salute of 
the month for calhng a Snsecond throw-in count cor- 
rectly even though he could have been "chicken" and 



*A 




NELSON HORNBECK 

been called great by the uninformed crowd had he 
called it the way the rooters thought was right. 

Not only Jerry, but eveiy official in the state tour- 
nament justified every faith the K. H. S. A. A. reposed 
in them. An Abou Ben Adhem award is on its way to 
all eight arbiters — "May their tribe increase." 

That "Kapos" group of cheerleaders adds lustre to 
every K. H. S. A. A. tournament. Every girl reflects 
credit on the school she represents, each is a courte- 
ous young lady, and each cheerleading group contrib- 
utes much toward Kentucky's reputation of "Sports- 
manship Capital of the Nation." 

May 27 is the day when Oran Teater and his pro- 
gressive community of Paintsville throw wide the 
city's portals to welcome everybody to its annual 
Universisty of Kentucky Day. "The Sage of the Moim- 
tains," who also serves on the K. H. S. A. A. Board of 
Control, offers everything to visitors on this day. Just 
to play a roimd of golf on that Paintsville course is 
attraction enough for the Dutchman. 

The Corn Cob Pipe of Honor Award for March goes 
to Joe Lally, popular golf pro at the Seneca Golf 
Course. Serving as president of the Professional Golf- 
ers' Association, Joe has done so much for boys and 
girls as well as adults that he is richly deserving of 
the honor. 

My old buddy, BOl Utley of Madisonville, has the 
same Idnd of greatness Joe Lally has. Bill wrote the 
Dutchman tliis week recalling the state tournaments 
we refereed together and the fine fellowship which 
comes with association in the K. H. S. A. A.'s sports 
program. You're right, Bill, it's great to live in Ken- 
tucky. 

Morton Combs of Carr Creek is one of the "nicest 
guys" and best coaches this Dutcliman knows. He has 
proved that "nice guys" do finish first and that a boy 
can have no better coach than his father. Watching 
his son, Glen Combs, write N. C. A. A. tournament 
history at V. P. I. on television made this writer 
proud to be the friend of Morton and Mrs. Combs 
because this basketball star is as great a gentleman 
as he is an athlete. This is What the game is all about 
— the development of competitors whom we are twice 
proud of bacause they are also gentlemen. 

Kentucky Village School, a few miles from Lexing- 
ton, has been adopted by Tommy Shuck, Le.xington 
basketball referee. Tommy is determined to get a 
modern scoreboard for the institution and the coach 
and his boys are grateful. You can be sure that 
Tommy's interest wUl get the kids what they want and 
the Dutchman is looking for one right now. 

Hopkinsville's "Gray Eagle," CharUe Irwin, writes 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR APRIL, 1967 



Page Nine 



1967 State Basketball Tournament Statistics 

Number of Games Included in Report: 15 

Average overall time from opening toss of ball to final gun: 1 hour and 20 minutes 
Average Score for Winners: 66.4 For Losers: 56.6 Total for Both: 123.1 
Total No. Free Throw Attempts (P & T for all games) : 45.8; Successful 30.7 
Total No. of Overtimes: 



Average No.: 
Average No. : 
Average No.: 

Average No. 

Average No.: 

Average No.: 

Average No.: 

Average No.: 

Average No.: 

Average No. : 

Average No.: 
Average No. : 



DATA COLLECTED BY FIRST STATISTICIAN 

(a) Fouls involving dribbler and guard: 9.1 

(b) Times dribbler committed foul: 1.4 

(c) Player control foul committed by player while he or a 
teammate was in control 2.3 

: (d) Personal fouls along free throw lane: By team A 1.02 

By team B ___ .06 

(e) Personal fouls committed by either team in back court 

of team with the ball 3.1 

(f) Times player committed five personal fouls 1.2 

(g) Intentional foul .13 

(h) Flagrant foul: 

(i) Technical foul on coach or bench personnel for unsports- 
manlike conduct: .13 

(j) Personal fouls per game (include all personals): 

By winning team 16.2 

By losing team 17.8 

(k) Technical fouls per game: By winning team .20 By los- 
ing team .06 
(1) Number of times official was required to indicate 

whether goal counted as period ended: .06 



per game 
per game 

per game 
per game 
per game 

per game 
per game 
per game 
per game 

per game 

per game 
per game 



per game 



DATA COLLECTED BY SECOND STATISTICIAN 



Average No. 
Average No. 



Average No. of times : 



Average No. 
Average No. 

Average No. 
Average No. 

Average No. 
Average No. 
Average No. 
Average No. 
Average No. 



Average No. of times: 



of times: (a) Violation for traveling (by both teams) 

of times: (b) Violation by team A player along free throw 
lane 

(c) Violation by team B player along free throw 
lane 

(d) Violation by free thrower 

(e) Violation of throw-in provision by player 
making throw-in 

(f) Basket interference occurred 

(g) Violation (of all types) : Winning team 

Losing team 

(i) Substitute entered after a violation 

(h) Substitutes entered game 

(j) Ball became alive by jump ball 

(k) Player "dunked" ball 

(1) Time-outs charged to: Winning team 

Losing team 

(m) Official was required to indicate whether 
goal counted as period ended: 



of times: 
of times: 

of times: 
of times : 

of times: 
of times: 
of times: 
of times: 
of times: 



6.5 per game 

.26 per game 

per game 
.06 per game 

.80 per game 

.13 per game 

9 per game 

9.3 per game 

5.4 per game 
10.9 per game 

1.8 per game 

.06 per game 

3.1 per game 

3.6 per game 

.20 per game 



that he and EDen have a brand new baby named 
Ammy Jo. Says "The Eagle" in his letter, "You can 
see that all is not dead with the "Gray Eagle" even 
if I am 42 today." Congratulations, "Gray Eagle." 
What well do you drink your water from? 

Get a park and recreation program organized in 
your community. Summer is near. Remember that 
many boys join gangs because they never had the 
opportunities to join teams. 



1967 ANNUAL MEETING 

(Continued from Page One) 
PROPOSAL VI 

Prin. Letcher W. Norton (Clark County) , Prin. James 
McAfee (Mt. Sterling) and Sister EMzabeth Marie (St. 
Agatha) propose that Article IV, Sections 1 and 2 of 
the Constitution, be amended to read as follows: 

Section I "and a Board of Control composed of 
sixteen members. 

Section II "Members of the Board of Control shall be 
elected for a period of four years by a vote of the 
Principals of member schools in each Basketball Re- 



Page Ten 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR APRIL, 1967 



gion. 

Exceptions: (for implementation) 

The newly created Board of Control membership 
from Regions 2, 3, 6, 8, 10, 11, 13, and 16 shaU be 
elected prior to June 1, 1967, and will take office July 
1, 1967, for the following terms of office: Regions 6 
and S— Terms 1967-1968; Regions 3 and 10— Terms 
1967-1989; Regions 13 and 16— Terms 1967-1970; Regions 
2 and 11— Terms 1967-1971. 

Regions 1, 4, 5, 7, 9, 12, 14, and 15 are to be repre- 
sented by present members of the Board of Control for 
the duration of their terms of office. 

The sixteen member Board of Control wiU be elected 
on the following staggered schedule: Regions 6, 8, 14, 
15— Term 19S8-1972; Regions 1, 3, 10, 12— Term 1969- 
1973; Regions 5, 7, 13, 16— Term 1970-1974; Regions 2, 
4, 9, 11— Term 1971-1975. 

Nominations for membership on the Board of Con- 
trol signed by three Principals of the Region, etc. 

Terms of Board members shall be staggered so that 
four will be elected each year, etc." 
PROPOSAL VII 

Prin. Lloyd Stumbo (McDowell) proposes to amend 
Article rv, Section 1 and Section 2-a of the Constitu- 
tion, to read as follows: 

"Section 1 Officers — The officers of the Association 
shall be a Commissioner and a Board of Control com- 
posed of sixteen members. 

Section 2 Procedure of Elections— a. Board of Con- 
trol—Members of the Board of Control shall be elected 
for a period of four years by vote of the principals of 
member schools in each section (Basketball Regions 1 
through 16). Thereby each Basketball Region sliall be 
represented by a member of the Board of Control. The 
remainder of Section 2-a sliaU remain as written in the 
present constitutional By-Laws." 



1967 Track Questions 

Editor's Note: These interpretations of the 1967 
National Alliance Track and Field Rules do not set 
aside nor modify any rule. The rulings are made and 
published by the National Federation of State High 
School Athletic Associations in response to situations 
presented. 

1. Situation: Due to a shortage of meet officials, a 
number of inspectors are called from their stations to 
help at the finish line. During a race, runner Al com- 
mits a foul on a turn where there is no inspector. 
However, the referee observes the action of Al. 

Ruling: The referee, more than any other official, is 
responsible for seeing that there is fairness in appli- 
cation of the rules. He has wide discretionary author- 
ity and may disqualify a runner who commits an 
infraction he observes, but which is not reported to 
him because of the absence of an inspector. 

2. Situation: Al takes a position on his mark when 
so ordered by the starter. Al does not chamge his posi- 
tion when the starter gives the command "set." The 
starter, in conformance with the rule, discharges the 
pistol and Al is "left" in his starting blocks. 

RuUng: Legal start. Al, as he prefers, may or may 
not take a position customarily used by a competitor 
in a dash race. The situation does not indicate nor 
imply that Al was in motion or over the line when llie 
pistol was fired and, therefore, there was no violation. 

Comment: It is recognized as proper procedure for 
the starter to explain the commands and the mechan- 
ics of starting to the competitors before a heat of any 
race is run. However, the starter is not obligated to 
do this and under no condition may he coaoh the 
competitors. 



3. Situation: In going over the cros bar, competitor 
Al in the high jump or pole valut hits it in such a 
way that it bounces up and down on the supports and 
finally falls off after Al has left the pit. 

Ruling: This is an unsuccessful trial. The fact that 
the competitor has left the pit does not enter into the 
judge's decision. If the bar is displaced as a result of 
being touched by the contestant during an attempt, it 
counts as a trial failed. 

4. Situation: Competitor Al grasps the javelin at the 
end of the cord grip. 

Ruling: It is customary to permit this, even though 
a competitor's finger and thumb may actually touch 
the javelin shaft. 

5. Situation: Javelin thrower Al throws the javelin 
from behind the scratch line and then runs off to one 
side, behind the scratch line extended, prior to the 
throw being measured. 

Ruling: The rules do not require a javelin thrower to 
stay within a prescribed area after his throw, provided 
he does not cross the scratch line or the scratch line 
extended. 

6. Situation: Is it true that a false start is never 
charged against a runner when the gun is fired? 

Ruling: No. Rule 6-2 now makes provisions for as- 
sessing a contestant with a false start when he is in 
motion after the "set" position has been taken, 
whether or not the gun is fired. 

7. Situation: Runners are in the "set" position when 
the gun is fired and they '^et an even start. However, 
as Al starts out, his starting blocks slip. 

Ruling: The race is recalled because of the unfair- 
ness of the start. 

8. Situation: Hurdler Al loses his equilibrium in 
advancing over a hurdle and steps or falls out of his 
lane. Does this call for disqualification? 

Ruling: This will not necessarily disqualify Al. As 
long as he does not advance or trail his foot or leg 
along the side of the hurdle, or inin over a hurdle not 
in his lane, or run around a hurdle, or when out of liis 
lane he does not interfere with an opponent, the mere 
act of falling or stepping from his lane would not dis- 
qualify him. 

9. Situation: Can an inspector who obsei-ves a run- 
ning infraction disquaUfy the violating runner? 

Ruling: No. The inspector must wave a red flag 
above his head when he detects any running infraction 
or irregularity. At the conclusion of the race he shall 
report what he has seen to the head inspector, who in 
turn shall report to the referee. The referee shall make 
the decision after hearing aU of the evidence. It is im- 
portant that the referee be firm and consistent. If the 
rules have been broken, a penalty should be invoked. 

10. Situation: How are inspectors assigned in races 
run in lanes around turns? 

Ruling: An inspector shall be assigned two lanes for 
an entire turn. It is his responsibiUty to determine 
whether the runners remain in their proper lanes. The 
head inspector should report to the referee after each 
race, even when there are no infractions or violations. 

11. Situation: Where should the inspector stand to 
properly judge the baton pass in relay races? 

Ruling: One of the best methods known is to have 
the inspectors seated in stands for them above the 
exchange zone. Two inspectors can adequately handle 
each zone. Another method which is popular is to sta- 
tion two inspectors on the inside and two on the out- 
side of the track. These men are to sight along the 
staggered zones, from the front and rear ends, to see 
that no pass is made outside the zone in any lane. 
Each inspector is to judge the lanes which are nearest 
him. 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR APRIL, 1967 



Page Eleven 



12. Situation: In the hurdle races and the dashes, 
where should inspectors be placed? 

Ruling: It is customary to place at least two inspec- 
tors directly behind the starting line. The other inspec- 
tors are stationed at intervals along the track, depend- 
ing upon the number of officials available for serving 
as inspectors. 

13. Situation: Where are inspectors placed for ob- 
serving violations which may occur on the straightaway 
and at the finish line in distance races? 

Ruling: When there are enough inspectors available, 
one or more should be placed in positions to be able 
to see any violation at these points. The most frequent- 
ly undetected violation is that committed by a leading 
runner who deliberately alters his course on the finish 
stretch to keep a following runner or runners from, 
passing. Although it is not among the responsibilities 
of the timers or finish judges to report such violations, 
the referee or chief inspector may bridge propriety and 
give weight to their observations as he sees fit. The 
inspector, stationed at the last part of the final turn of 
the race, may very well be able to observe at times 
such violations and he should report them as one of 
his duties. 

14. Situation: Runner Al fcdls while approaching the 
finish line, and while on the ground crawls entirely 
across the finish line without breaking the yarn or 
touching it. He is the first to reach and cross the line. 

Ruling: The finish yarn is used only for the purpose 
of aiding the judges and the winner of any race is not 
decided upon its breakage. Some judges fail to reahze 
this point. Runners shall be placed in the order in 
which any part of their bodies (torso, as distinguished 
from their head, arms, feet, or hands) reach the finish 
hne. In the case of a fallen runner, the entire body 
must cross the finish line. Note that the finish is not 
decided by the position of the head, arms, feet or 
hands. Some runners and some judges allow the posi- 
tion of any of these members to influence their deci- 
sion by reason of their lack of knowledge of this rule. 
The runner can best protect himself by working out a 
finish form which calls for an extended chest prior to 
breasting the tape. 

15. Situation: Competitor puts the shot or throws the 
discus and the implement lands on a sector line. 

Ruling: This is a violation which makes the throw 
or put count as a trial and it is not measured. 

16. Situation: If the starter is also the referee, 
should he penalize any foul he observes or should he 
act only on a report by an inspector? 

Ruling: He should penalize any foul he sees. 

17. Situation: Prior to the scheduled date for con- 
ducting an invitational track meet, there is every 
indication that from five to ten schools will be send- 
ing representatives to compete. Advance instructions 
whidh are sent to the competing schools provide for 
the scoring accordingly. Only four schools send rep- 
resentatives. 

Ruling: The Games Committee has the authority to 
announce a revision in the scoring prior to the begin- 
nin,'g of the meet. When no change is announced, it 
is traditional to follow the instruction sheet and 
score the meet on the basis of the mailed notifica- 
tion. 

18. Situation: Watches used for timing at a given 
meet are calibrated so that the smallest period of 
time of measurement is one-fifth (1/5) second. Al is 
timed at 9 1/5 seconds in the 100 yard dash. Can 
this time qualify for a new national interscholastic 
record? 

Ruling: No. If a time is to be accepted as a rec- 
ord, the instruments used to time the race must 



measure intervals of at least one-tenth (1/10) of a 
second. Electric timers which measure one-hundredth 
(1/100) of a second are accepted as official. 

19. Situation: A timer is using his thumb to oper- 
ate a stopwatch for the timinf of track events. 

Ruling: Those who are knowledgeable in this mat- 
ter advise using the index finger. It is generally 
conceded that the index finger responds more quickly 
than any other body part when voluntary muscles 
are involved. 

20. Situation: In a triangular track meet, the 
Games Committee announces that four places will be 
scored on a 5-3-2-1 basis. In the high jump, only 
three boys enter or only three competitors clear the 
bar at the first height. Should points for only the 
first three places be awarded or should the three 
place winners each be awarded an additional fraction 
of the fourth place point? 

Ruling: In a case of this kind, it is customary to 
score only three places (5-3-2 points) and to disre- 
gard the fourth place point. However, the Games 
Committee is usually permitted discretion in con- 
nection with decisions for problems which have not 
been anticipated and have not been announced prior 
to the meet, so that if it were its decision, the three 
place winners could each be awarded an additional 
fraction of the point, the total of which would equal 
the point for fourth place. 

21. Situation: In the pole vault in a meet, through 
whidh contestants qualify for a state meet, Al has 
clearly won the event. There is a four-way tie for 
second place between Bl, CI, Dl and El. A tie still 
remains after the application of Rule 5-2-I-(a), (b) 
and (c). Since the tie does not involve first place, 
5-2-I-(d) is not applicable. Only two contestants from 
a regional are to qualify to the state final in this 
event. Who shall qualify? 

Ruling: There is no provision in the Track and 
Field Rules and Records Book for determining quali- 
fication to a succeeding meet. The rules govern a 
single meet and/or its preliminaries. The games 
committee or local meet director should announce, 
or publish before the meet begins, exactly how- 
qualification shall be determined in case the state 
association office has not outlined procedure to be 
followed. It is recommended that places and points 
for all contestants be determined before any decision 
is made in regard to quahfication. 

22. Situation: Runner Al takes his mark or set 
position with his hand or hands on the starting line. 

Ruling: "At the start, no competitor shall touch 
the track with any part of the body on or ahead of 
the marked line." The starter is responsible to see 
that the hands of competitors shall be placed behind 
the starting line. 

23. Situation: In the 880 yard event, Al and Bl are 
advancing around a curve when Bl clearly forces Al 
off the track. The inspector indicates the infraction. 
At the time of the infraction, no other competitor is 
within 50 yards of Al or Bl. Both runners continue 
to race, with Al winning and Bl finishing second. 
Since the interference did not prevent Al from win- 
ning the race, should the infraction be overlooked and 
should Bl be awarded points for second place? 

Ruling: The inspector must report the infraction 
to the head inspector who will relay the data to the 
referee. The referee may, even though Al finished 
first, disqualify Bl if, in the referee's judgment, the 
infraction necessitates disqualification. In arriving at 
his decision, the referee may consider whether the 
act was deUberate or unsportsmanlike, or whether 
the infraction hindered Al from establishing a record. 



Page Twelve 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR APRIL. 1967 



The Special Football Plan Designed For 
Kentucky High School Football Coaches As- 
sociation Will Be Offered In Connection With 
An Excellent Student Accident Coverage For 
Your Schools. 
Your Inquiries Will Be Answered Promptly. 



V<4e fCi*UfxlUn Qo4nfiG4i4f> 



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W. E. KINGSLEY 



121-123 LAFAYETTE AVENUE 
P. O. BOX 7100 



J. E. MoCREARY, Mgr. 
Life Depautoient 

LEXINGTON, KY. 40502 



CHARLES C. PRICE 



PHONE 254-4095 



24. Situation: In a trial heat, huixller Al reaches 
the last hurdle. He does not attempt to go over this 
hurdle but uses his hands to push the hurdle over, 
after which he finishes the race. 

Ruling: Al should be disqualified. A competitor 
must attempt to clear each hurdle. If he knocks over 
a hurdle in such an attempt, he has not violated any 
rule, but if he pushes the huixlle over witih has hand, 
it should be treated the same as if he has run 
around a hurdle. 

25. Situation: Al is at the starting station in a relay 
race and is assessed a false start. His coach requests 
permission to change teammate A2 with him, in an 
effort to cancel the false start. 

Ruling: This may not be done. Even though the 
rules are not specific concerning changes in the order 
of runners, the interpretation dictates that changes 
are disallowed after positions are taken. 

26. Situation: Is it permissible for a pole vaulter 
or a high jumper to pass an opportunity to vault or 
jump at any height in his turn and still be a part of 
the competition? 

Ruling: It is, but he loses the privilege of that one 
opportunity at that height. The pass counts as one of 
his three allowed turns at that height. A competitor 
does have three choices. He may: (a) pass on all 
three chances at a height; or (b) miss on his first 
trial and pass either or both of the remaining two 
turns; or (c) pass either of the first trials and stiU 
continue in the competition at a subsequent height, 
provided, of course, that he has not already had 
three consecutive failures. 

27. Situation: Al places his pole in the planting pit 



but he does not leave the ground nor does any part 
of his body pass under the crossbar or beyond the 
stopboard plane. 

Ruling: There has been no trial. 

28. Situation: In the two-mile relay on a quarter- 
mile track, Al, A2, A3 and A4 occupy the same 
stations for their half-mile lap. Al comes into the 
exchange zone at the end of his leg in the race, but, 
in attempting to pass the baton, Al and A2 colMe 
and fall. The baton falls to the ground and, in the 
confusion, A3 (instead of A2) picks up the baton and 
runs the leg of the race which Wcis originally intend- 
ed for A2. In the exchange, there was no interference 
;with any other runner, and A2 and A4 complete the 
remaining laps. 

Ruling: While the rules do not specify which mem- 
bers of a team shall run a given leg in a race, they 
imply the runner assigned shall run it. In the case 
of irregularities, not specifically covered by rule, the 
referee has some elastic authority, and, in ruling on 
such irregularities, he is generally influenced by 
whether any advantage resulted to the individual or 
to the team. In the case cited, Al and A2 committed 
errors in taking positions which caused a coUision. 
It is obvious it would have required time for A2 to 
regain his feet and continue the race. To this extent, 
A3 attempted to gain an advantage by running the 
leg originally assigned A2. In this situation, the 
referee would usually rule the team was disquali- 
fied because of the exchange in the running order by 
runners A3 and A2. 




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BASKETBALL GOALS 

No. 5812 — Official for any High School gym or playground. 

Pair, complete with nets $ 9-45 

No. 38S — Outdoor practice goal. Equally satisfactory for indoor use. 

Pair, complete with nets $ 2.95 

HORSE SHOES 

No. DR — Regulation size and weight; drop forged. Pair $ 2.20 

No. OS— Regulation pitching stakes for playing horse shoes. Per Pair $ 2.20 

TETHER BALLS 

No. 50027 — Tether Ball Set. Official Ball with 10' jointed pole and rules, complete Each $ 7.95 

No. 509-R — Tether Ball, complete with rope _. Each $ 6.60 

VOLLEYBALLS 

No. 58? — Seamless — Molded type, especially for outdoor play. Each $ 5.65 

No. 9190— Volley Ball Net. Each S 5.88 

RUBBER PLAYGROUND BALLS 

No. 405 — Extra heavy. 10" diameter when inflated; rubber inflation valve Each $ 2.88 

No. 404 — Same as above, but 8Vii" diameter Each $ 2.29 

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BADMINTON SETS 

No. 50005 — 4 rackets; 1 pi. pests with net; 2 birds and rules Each S 7.25 

SOFTBALLS AND BATS 

No. CN-12 — Sutcliffe's official night ball; special white cover, recommend for 

Tournament play. Each $ 1.95 

No. HW-212 — Rubber covered ball : designed for playground use. Each $ 1.20 

No 51-H — Softball bat — made by "Louisville Slugger" factory; tape grip. Each 5 1'20 

All Prices Shown are SpeclaS School Prices 

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Outdoor playground programs will be conducted in many schools during 
summer months. 

Our stock is complete on all types of playground and play time equipment, 

Try our "WE SHIP THE DAY YOU BUY" service on: 

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Regulation horseshoes in steel and rubber 
Shuffleboard sets and supplies 
Tennis racquets, nets and balls 

If you plan to have baseball in connection with your recreation program, 
we have a complete stock of uniforms, shoes, bats, balls and gloves in 
Little League, Babe Ruth League and regulation sizes. 

Please write or call for complete information and prices, and our sales- 
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Our salesmen have been out since January 1st with the 1967-1968 Football 
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TRINITY HIGH SCHOOL SWIMMING TEAM 
KENTUCKY CLASS AAA CHAMPION— 1967 




(Left to Right) Front Row: Jerry Mudd, Jim Hartye, Lee Gerstle, Jim 
Sympson, Jim Edmondson, Jeff Durham, Joe White, Dennis Fackler, Tim 
Heustis, Mike Radmacher. Second Row: Tom Callahan, Dennis Parsley, 
Tom Pursley, Steve Resch, Nick Ulmer, Pete Russell, Chris Zaephel, Bob 
Hancock, Scott Wright. Third Row: Coach Bob Hublar, Vic Davenport, 
Carter Sherman, Captain Tom Redmond, Kevin Curran, Larry Ebersold, 
Paul Daniels, Dave Koenig, Doug Perry, Steve Wiesman, Rick Koch, Mgr. 
Dave Wittry. 



Official Organ of the 

KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION 

May, 1967 







WESTPORT HIGH SCHOOL GIRLS' SWIMMING TEAM 
KENTUCKY CLASS AAA CHAMPION— 1967 




(Left to Right) F ont Row: C. Scott, K. Kerridgc, K. Belanger, L. Render, J. Crosby, H. Freitag, P. Phoenix, 
C. Campbell, P. Safriet. Second Row: D. Brown, B. Barrows, B. Masharka, M. Welsh, M. Redmon, P. Hender- 
son, B. Stark, A. Wright. Third Row: Coach Greg Bobrow, J. Hill. N. Curtis, D. Showalter, M. Blaske, L. 
Henderson, N. Curtis, L. Richardson, S. Sprigg, B. Henderson. 



HIGHLANDS HIGH SCHOOL GIRLS' SWIMMING TEAM 
KENTUCKY CLASS AA CHAMPION— 1967 




(Left to Rig^ht) Front Row: Kyle, Bezold, Hewling, McMillan. Ader, Camm, Klausing. K. Sarring. Second Row: 
Bohart, Cline. MacFarlan, Grimm, S. Klausing, Gross, Wychoff, Rust, Wychoff, Third Row: Coach J. Stivers, 
Gabbard, K. Sarring, Huheey, Dodson, Stross, Roell, Partin, Artopoeius, Perry, Lawrence. Fourth Row: Stivers, 
Reed. Reed, Ney, Kiel, Grover, Cecil, Snyd er, Jones, Guest, Bernardine. 



The Kentucky High School Athlete 

Official Organ of the 
Kentucky High School Athletic Association 



VOL. XXDi— NO. 10 



MAY, 1967 



$1.00 Per Year 



MINUTES OF THE ANNUAL MEETING 



The fiftieth annual meeting of the Kentucky High 
School Athletic Association was held at the Kentucky 
Hotel, Louisville, on Thursday afternoon, April 13, 
1967. 

President Sherman Gish called the meeting to 
order at 3:00, and asked the Commissioner to call the 
roll. Fifty-eight regularly elected delegates or alter- 
nates answered the roll call. 

Clyde Lassiter moved, seconded by J. Waymon 
Hackett, that the minutes of the 1966 meetmg of the 
.Assembly, which had been sent previously to all mem- 
ber schools, be approved without being read. The mo- 
rion was carried unanimously. 

Commissioner Sanford then gave a report on the 
activities of the Association during the 1966-67 school 
year. (The report of the Conmiissioner appears else- 
where in this issue of the magazine.) 

The Commissioner announced the election of Alvin 
.\Imond and Don Davis to membership on the Board 
5f Control for a four-year period, beginning July 1, 

1967, representing respectively Sections 2 and 5. 
President Gish stated that consideration of the 

proposals was the next order of business. 

Gilbert Richardson moved, seconded by James 
Baker, that Proposal I, providing for the required 
registration of baseball officials, be tabled. The 
motion failed to carry by a vote of 19-13. Joe Ohr 
moved, seconded by P. P. Estridge that Proposal I 
be adopted. The motion carried by a vote of 39-17, 
which Wcis more than the necessary two-thirds major- 
ity. 

Letdher W. Norton moved, seconded by Clyde Las- 
siter, that Proposal II, providing that a team may 
enter only one county, conference, or invitational 
tournament during the regular basketball season, be 
tabled. The motion was carried unanimously. 

Preston Parrott moved, seconded by O. J. Mdtdh- 
ell, that Proposal III, giving the Board of Control 
authority to set the fees for officials in district and 
regional basketball tournaments, be tabled. The motion 
failed to carry by a vote of 29-25. Robert F. Dozier 
moved, seconded by Corky Cox, that Proposal HI be 
adopted. The vote was 32-23 in favor of the motion, 
but this was not the necessary two-thirds majority. 

O. J. Mitchell moved, seconded by Roy D. Rey- 
nolds, that Proposal IV, providing for a change in the 
.4ge Rule, Byiaw 4, to take effect as of August 1, 

1968, be tabled. The motion failed to carry by a vote 
of 28-25. Frank Lyons moved, seconded by Don Shaw, 
that Proposal IV be adopted. The vote was 31-27 in 
favor of the motion, but this was not the necessary 
two-thirds majority. 

P. P. Estridge moved, seconded by PhiDip Cox, 
that Proposal V, providing that each athlete shall have 
a copy of his birth certificate on file in the principal's 
office, be adopted. The motion failed to carry by a 
\ote of 49-4. 

Phenis Potter moved, seconded by William E. 



Haines, that Proposal VI, providing that the Board of 
Control be increased in number to sixteen members, 
be tabled. The motion failed to carry by a vote of 
29-27. Letcher W. Norton moved, seconded by Paul E. 
Patrick, that Proposal VI be adopted. The vote was 
28-27 in favor of the motion, but this was not the 
necessary two-thirds majority. 

Robert F. Dozier moved, seconded by O. J. Mitch- 
ell, that Proposal VII, another proposal providing that 
Ihe Board of Control be increased in number to sixteen 
members, be tabled. The motion carried by a vote of 
29-15. 

There being no further business. President Gish 
declared the meeting adjourned. 

The dinner meeting of the Association was held in 
the Crystal Ballroom of the Brown Hotel at 6:00 P.M., 
with some 600 delegates ;md other school officials 
present. 

The Commissioner presented the Cavana Swim- 
ming Award to Prin. Harold Miller of the Highlands 
High School whdch had won the 1966-67 trophy. 

Recipient of the Game Guy Award was David Har- 
mond of the EUzabethtown High School. The presenta- 
tion of the award was made by K.H.S.A.A. Director 
Ralph C. Dorsey. 

The address of the evening was given by Coach 
Ray EUot, Assistant Director of Athletics at the Uni- 
versity of Illinois. The subject, of Mr. EUot's talk was 
"Something to Think About." A standing ovation by 
those present at the meeting gave evidence of the 
inspiration of Mr. Eliot's message. 



1966-67 ANNUAL REPORT 
(Presented to Delegate Assembly) 

Three hundred seventy-four schools have joined 
the Association during the 1966-67 school year. This 
number compares with 382 K.H.S.A.A. members last 
year. School consolidation has been causing a decrease 
in the number of Association members each year for 
the past several years. 

Financial reports filed by the sixteen regional 
basketball tournament managers show total receipts 
of $172,958.66. District receipts were $246,762.45. These 
figures represent respective increases of thirty percent 
and ten percent over 1966 receipts. Receipts from 
ticket sales at the State Basketball Tournament, in- 
cluding state tax, will approximate $192,000.00. Profit 
to the Association on the tournament will be close to 
$150,000.00. This amount will almost completely under- 
write the current K.H.S.A.A. budget of $165,000.00. A 
complete record of all receipts and disbursements will 
appear in a subsequent issue of the Association maga- 
zine. 

Thirteen hundred seventy basketball officials, 575 
football officials, and 170 baseball officials 'have regis- 
tered with the Association in 1966-67. Ten football rules 
clinics were held under the direction of Edgar Mc- 
( Continued on Page Four) 



Page Two 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MAY, 1967 



MAY, 1967 



VOL. XXIX— NO. 10 



Pnblished monthly, except Jane and July, by the Eentack> 

Hifirh School Athletic Association 

Office of Publication, Lexingrton, Ky, 40501 

Second class postage paid at Lexington, Kentucky. 

editor THEO. A. SANPORL 

Assistant Editor J. B. MANSFIELL 

Lexington, Ky. 
BOARD OF CONTROL 

President Sherman Gish (1963-67). GreenviUi 

Vice-President Don Davis (1963-67), Independence 

Directors — Morton Combs (1964-68), Carr Creek; Ralph C. 
Dorsey (1966-70) , Horse Cave; Preston Holland (1965-69) 
Murray; Don R. Rawlings (1965-69), Danville; Foster ^ 
Sanders (1966-70), Louisville; Oran C. Teater (1964-68,, 
Paintsville. 

Subscription Rate $1.00 Per Year 



J*iom tne Ci 



ommissionei s 



Off. 



ice 



REPORTS PAST DUE 

1966-67 Basketball Participation List 
(Eligibility) 

School's Report on Basketball Officials 
Official's Report on Schools (Basket- 
ball) 



Attention, Principals ! 

Approximately 80 principals of K.H.S.A.A. member 
schools have not as yet filed requests this school year 
for their insurance subsidies. If the school is under- 
writing all or part of insurance protection for its 
athletes, the Board of Control will allow a maximum 
credit or refund of $40.00 to each school for "all sports 
except football," and an additional credit or refund of 
$60.00 to each school maintaining a football team. 
Principals of schools which qualify for the credit or 
refund should write for reimbursement forms at once. 

The Cavana Award 

As announced at the annual dinner meeting of the 
Association, the Highlands High School of Fort Thomas 
won the M. J. Cavana Swimming Achievement Award 
for the school year 1966-67. Presentation of the beauti- 
ful trophy was made to Prin. Harold Miller of High- 
lands. This is the sixth year for the award to be given. 

The point score of the Highlands High School in 
winning the Cavana Award was 70.4. The Tates Creek 
High School of Lexington was second in the scoring 
with 51.6. 

In determining the points which a school competing 
for the award may accumulate, the State Swimming 
Committee secures the following information: 

1. What is the current enrollment of the high 
school (grades 9-12) as of January 15? 

2. How many pupils can swim 45 feet in deep 
water? 

3. What is the number of pupils who can swim 
correctly any three of the following strokes for fifty 
yards: crawl stroke, back crawl, elementary back- 
stroke, breaststroke, side stroke? 

4. How many pupils hold currently life saving or 
senior life saving certificates (American Red Cross or 
Y. M. C. A.)? 

5. In how many meets did the school team par- 
ticipate during the school year, and in how many ol 
these meets did the team enter at least six events? 

6. How many swimmers have represented or will 
represent the school in the State Swimming meet held 
during the school year involved? 

In determining the points which may be awarded 
a competing school in the various categories, the per- 



centage of the student body which can comply with the 
standards suggested in questions 2, 3, and 4, is the 
important factor. 



The Basketball Hall of Fame 

Since the listing of Basketball Hall of Fame con- 
tributors appeared in the March issue of the ATH- 
LETE, twelve additional K.H.S.A.A. member schools 
have made contributions or pledges, bringing the total 
number of contributing schools to sixty-seven. Of this 
number, fifty-four schools have taken out or will take 
out group memberships of $100.00. Contributing mem- 
bers are listed below: 

$100 Contributions and Pledges 

Adair County Durrett M. M. I. 

Allen County E'town Catholic Morgan County 

Austin-Tracy Eubank Ohio County 

Bath County Ezel Owensboro 

Bishop David Fairview Paducah Tilghman 

Bloomfield Harlan Paul G. Blazer 

Bourbon County Hazard Pikeville 

Bracken County Henry Clay Pleasure Ridge Park 

Breathitt Henry County Beidland 

Calhoun Inez Rowan County 

Campbellsvillf Jenkins St. Mary's (Whites- 

Caneyville Ky. School for Deaf ville) 

Carr Creek Leitchfield Sayre 

Caverna Leslie County Somerset 

Clay County Lily Tates Creek 

Covington Catholic Logan Co. A.A. Temple Hill 

Daviess County Livingston Central Tompkinsville 

Danville Ludlow Valley 

Dayton Mason County Williamstown 

Dunbar Midway 

Contributions Less Than $100 

Beechwood Knott County Prichard 

Campbell County Monticello Pulaski County 

Central Nancy Shopville 

Ferguson Paintsville Wayne County 
Holmes 

Approved Baseball Officials 

Some fifty K.H.S.A.A. officials registered in base- 
ball took the National Federation baseball examination 
for the higher rating on April 17, 1967. Thirty-three of 
this number qualified to receive the Approved rating 
which is the only advanced rating available this year 
due to the fact that this is the second year for the 
K.H.S.A.A. to register umpires. Officials who qualified 
for the Approved rating were: 
Boose, William J. Kidwell, James S. 

Chesney, Orville Kimmel, Jerry 

Cline, Roy E. King, James A. 

Collins, C. E. "Jack" Kircher, Dennis Wayne 

Culp, Willard E. Landers, John F. 

Davis, Bunny Long, Bill 

Duerson, W. R. McKinney, Adelle F. 

Elliott, Carroll Marlette, Ronald L. 

Eyl, Edward \\ Mattingly, Charles D. 

Giordano, Al Morse, Richard K. 

Hardin, Don G. Penner, Merritt D. 

Hubbs, Cletus L., Ji Shaw, Earl 

Johnson, James M Strain, Richard P. 

Johnson, Robert L. Thomas, Bill 

Jones, Frank Wesche, James Al 

Jones, Joe S. Wingfield, Felix G. 

Kasperski, Harry W. Wren, Bethel 

Kays, Allie 

SUPPLEMENTARY LIST OF 
REGISTERED BASEBALL OFFICIALS 

(List Compiled May 1) 

If one telephone number is given for an official listed, it 
is the home phone unless otherwise designated. If two numbers 
are given, the first number is that of the home phone. 

Barnes, Karl Allison, Box 115, Nortonville, 676-3334 

Block, Lloyd H., Route 2, Eminence, 845-5262, 846-4071 

Booker, James M., Brownsville, 597-2628, 749-2665 

Brown, Billy C, Ky. Towers Apts., Berea 

Browne, Jei-ome F., Box 116, Barlow, 334-4356, 334-4491 

Certain, Garland, 1302 Washington, Sturgis, 333-2828, 333-4008 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MAY. 1967 



Page Three 



Claypool. Thomas W.. Route 2, Owensboro, 684-8719, 684-3112 
Collins, C. E. "Jack," 35 Rosehill Drive, Clarksville, Tenn.. 

647-0154, 798-4411 
Cooper, Willie, 2206 Madson. Paducah, 443-3107, 444-7251 
Davis, Curt 1119 E. Burnett, Louisville, ME 4-4959, JU 2-3511 
Delk. William L., 409 Oak St.. Ludlow, 261-8571 
Dickens, James E., Campbellsville 
Durbin, Roy, 2911 Dale Ann Drive. Louisville 
Elliott, Carroll L., 307 College St., Elizabethtown, 765-4007, 

765-6118 
Elmore, Jimmy A., Ekron, S28-6172. 828-3122 

Fish, Leland G., 826 Oak H-11 Lexington. 255-7156, 254-7080 
Fraley. Bill. 1604 Lee Drive, Henderson, VA 7-3232, VA 6-2601 
Hasty, Lloyd. West Broadway, Eminence 

Hazelwood. Howard, 29 Burke, Florence, 282-1258, 282-2191 
Hendrix, Jack, 415 S. Mill, London. 864-2075, 864-2331 
Hina, Henry B., Sturgis. 333-5933, 333-4008 

Hollingsworth, Henry R., Box 481. Elkton, 265-2340, 265-2545 
Hooper, Robert Allan, 3052-A Gorgas Ave., 798-5847, 798-5922 
Hudson. Douglas, Wo-thville, 732-6423 
Hurt, Thomas C, 220 Crab Orchard St., Lancaster, 792-2312 

I Bus. I 
Jackson, Edward, 2507 W. 9th St., Owensboro. MU 4-4664 
Jenkins, Ronald Edward, 2116 Gregory Drive, Henderson, 

VA 6-8202, VA 6-8202 
Lambert, Irvin. 5110 Rural Wav, Louisville, 969-4718. GL 8-1948 
Laskey. George O., Box M.. Beittyville 464-2509. 464-2767 
Louden, James. 10 Smith. Florence. 283.5611 
Lovell. Monty Joe. 429 Oak St.. Richmond, 623-1304 
Markham, James R.. 37^ S. L''"es'one Lexington. 252-5393 
Noland. Doug, 305 Herndon, Stanford, 365-2609, 365-2619 
Rash, Lindell L., Box 278, Mortons Gap, 258-5136. 258-5362 
Ray. Collis, 809 North 32nd St.. Paducah 
Ring. Bill, 481 Rookwood Lex'ngton 219-7089. 254-1102 
Rowe, Steve. 4133 Flintlock Drive. Louisville. 447-8537. 969-1331 
Sharp. Lloyd. Box 244, Dixon, 639-5267, 639-2851 
Shearer, Robert L., 221 N. Main St., Eminence 
Smith. Wyatt "Jack." 203 Ohio St.. Somerset. 678-4705. 678-8162 
Spurr. Sterling. Jr.. Eminence 

Sullivan. Don ChHs. '"83 O d ^^assHu n-., Lexington 
Treadway. Billy T.. 221-A Central Hall. W. K. U.. Bowling 

Green, 745-2167, Louisville 895-8917 
Wickham, James Robert, 311 Cathedral Manor. Bardstown, 

348-5282 
Woods, Herman Clyde, Route 1, Trenton, 466-7796, Elkton 

265-2439 
Wylie, Wayne T.. 737 Lakeview Drive. Lexington. 252-6076 



In Memoriam 



MINUTES OF BOARD MEETING 

The Board of Control of the Kentucky High School 
Athletic Association met at the Kentucky Hotel, Louis- 
ville, on Friday morning. April 14, 1967. The meeting 
was called to order by President Gish, with all Board 
members. Commissioner Theo. A. Sanford, and Assist- 
ant Commissioner J. B. Mansfield present. The invo- 
cation was given by President Gish. 

Don R. Rawlings moved, seconded by Preston Hol- 
land, that the reading of the minutes of the March 
17th meeting be waived since members of the Board 
had received copies of these minutes. The motion was 
carried unanimously. 

Oran C. Teater moved, seconded by Ralph C. 
Dorsey, that the prehminary report of the Commis- 
sioner on State Basketball Tournament receipts and 
expenses, as made to the Delegate Assembly, be 
accepted. The motion was carried unanimously. 

Don R. Rawlings, moved, seconded by Oran C. 
Teater, that Sherman Gish be named delegate to the 
forthcoming Annual Meeting of the National Federa- 
tion. The motion was carried. 

Don Davis moved, seconded by Ralph C. Dorsey, 
that Don R. Rawlings be named alternate to the forth- 
coming Annual Meeting of the National Federation. 
The motion was carried. 

There was a discussion on the advisability of the 
first session of the 1968 State High School Basketball 
Tournament being played on Wednesday afternoon 
instead of Wednesday evening. It was the majority 
thinking of the Board that this change in the tourna- 
ment plan should be made in 1968. The Commissioner 
stated that this recommendation by the Board will be 
followed. 

There had been discussions in previous Board 




CARLOS OAKLEY 

Carlos Oakley, 59, a former member of the 
K.H.S.A.A. Board of Control (1947-551. former Board 
President (1953-55), and former State Commissioner of 
Welfare during the Combs administration, was killed 
in an automobile accident on March 27, 1967. At the 
time of his death, Mr. Oakley was a member of the 
staff of Lt. Gov. Harry Lee Waterfield. 

Son of the late Rev. William T. Oakley, a Cumber- 
land Presbyterian minister, and Mrs. Oakley, Mr. 
Oakley was born and spent his early life in Crittenden 
County. He was a graduate of Marion High School and 
Western Kentucky University, with A.B. and M.A. 
de,grees from that institution. He participated in foot- 
ball, basketball, and track while he was in high school, 
and played football for Western. In 1947 he became 
county superintendent of Union County. Previously he 
had been coach and principal at Hawesville, superin- 
tendent at Livermore, principal at Greenville, and 
principal at Morganfield. Widely known in both educa- 
tion and political circles in Kentucky, he once served 
as President of the Kentucky Education Association. 
In 1960 he became State Commissioner of Welfare. 

Durin.g his residence in Morganfield, Mr. Oakley 
served for many years as teacher of the Berean Bible 
Class of the Morganfield Baptist Church. Surviving 
are his son. Bill Oakley; two daughters, Mrs. Bill 
Tom Riggs and Mrs. Larry Pollard, all of Morgan- 
field; and ten grandchildren. 

meetings concerning the possibility of changing some- 
what the plan of basketball regional tournament draw- 
ings in order to make it impossible for the winner and 
runner-up in any district to meet in the first round of 
the regional tournament. Don R. Rawlings moved, 
seconded by Oran C. Teater, that the following be 
added to Basketball Tournament Rule IV, Drawings: 
"In a regional tournament of eight teams, the four 
district winners will draw for positions 1, 3, 5, and 7. 
The corresponding runner-up teams will draw for posi- 
tions in the opposite brackets. In regional tournaments 
with less than eight teams, the first bye shall be 2 
and the second bye shall be 7." The motion was car- 
( Continued on Page Sixteen) 



Page Four 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MAY, 1967 



The State Gymnastics Meet 

By Bob IVason, Meet Director 

The first sanctioned Kentucky High School Gym- 
nastics Championships were held on April 1, 1967 at 
the University of Louisville. Though competitive gym- 
nastics in the stale of Kentucky is still in its infancy, 
the sport has aroused enough interest during the past 
few sea7ons to provide the meet with a surprisingly 
large turnout of spectators. 

Twenfy-3ne teams took part in the all-day event. 
Two separate meets were conducted simultaneously, 
with eleven teams of boys competing in one meet and 
ten teams of girls in the other. Though the experience 
of meet competition was new to many of the partici- 
pants, all evenis moved along smoothly, and the .judg- 
ing was termed "very good" by the coaches present. 

The Boys Team Title was easily won by Thomas 
Jefferson High School of Louisville with I26V2 points. 
Led by the outstanding work of Albert Boykins, who 
won the All Around Title, the Thomas Jefferson boys 
captured every first place in the seven events. The 
second place team honors went to Coach George Jef- 
ferson's Iroquois High School team, also from Louis- 
ville. The Iroquois boys collected 26', 2 points in their 
bid for the title and were led by JMike Gregory. Mike 
placed fourth in the Boys All Around event. In third 
place was Lafayette Senior High School of Lexington, 
with thirteen points. 

The Girls Team Title was also won by Louisville's 
Thomas Jefferson High School with 70 points. In second 
place was Iroquois with 36 points, and third place 
went to Tates Creek Senior High with 20 points. The 
Thomas Jefferson girls were led by Gloria Clark and 
Donna Meredith, who finished first and second, respec- 
tively, in the All Around event. 

A committee of coaches for gymnastics education, 
now being formed, will endeavor to promote further 
understanding and acceptance of the sport in the 
schools of Kentucky during the coming year. It is 
hoped that new coaches, who may need assistance or 
advice, will avail themselves of the services of this 
committee by contacting the Commissioner of the 
Kentuci;y High School Athletic Association in Lexing- 
ton. 

With another year of growth to look forward to, 
we foresee a s:ill larger and more representative meet 
for 1987-68, and hope that those who were unable to 
attend this year will be with us for our next State 
Championship. 

Results of the Meei 

BOYS 
Final Team Totals 

(1) Thomas Jefferson 126 1/2 points; (2) Iroquois 26 1/2; 
<3) Lexington Lafayette 13; (4) Daviess County 9 1/2; (5) 
Le.xington Tates Creek 8; (6) Central 5 1/2; (7) Male High 2. 
Key 

TJ — Thomas Jefferson ; I — Iroquois ; L — Lafayette ; DC — 
Daviess County ; TC — Tates Creek ; PRP — Pleasure Ridge Park. 
Individual Events 

Side horse— 1. Albert Boykins (TJ) ; 2. Gary Borders (TJ) : 
(3) tie between Mike Motlev (TJ) and David Bingham (I). 

Trampoline — 1. Motley (TJ) : 2. Bob Sanford (L) ; 3. Nard 
Johnson (TC). 

Floor Exercise — 1. Boykins (TJ) ; 2. Motley (TJ) ; 3. Sanford 
(Ll. 

Horizontal bar— 1. Boykins (TJ) ; 2. Motley (TJ) ; 3 Chris 
Miller (I). 

Parallel bars — 1. Boykins (TJ) ; 2. Jim Clanton (DC) ; 3. 
Motley (TJ). 

Long horse vaulting — 1. Boykins (TJ) ; 2. Motley (TJ) ; 3. 
Joe Linfoot (I). 

Still rings — 1. Boykins (TJ) ; 2. Borders (TJ) ; 3. Steve Wides 
(TC). 

Tumbling— 1. Boykins (TJ) ; 2. Motley (TJ) : 3. Sanford (L). 

All-around — 1. Boykins (TJ) ; 2. Motley (TJ) ; 3. Borders 
<TJ). 



GIRLS 
Final Team Totals 

(1) Thomas Jefferson 70; (2) Iroquois 36; (3) Tates Creek 
20: (4) Pleasure Ridge Park 19; (5) Lafayette 7; (6) Tie 
between Seneca and Lexington Bryan Station, each with 1 1/2. 

Individual Events 

Floor exercises — 1. Debbie Newton (TC) ; 2. Gloria Clark 
(TJ); 3. Kathy Carlton (L). 

Tumbling— 1. Miss Clark (TJ) ; 2. Hariett Nelson (I) ; 3. 
Donna Meredith (TJ). 

Valuting— 1. Miss Clark (TJ) ; 2. Miss Meredith (TJ) ; 3. 
Linda Kincaid (I). 

Balance beam — 1. Miss Clark (TJ) ; 2. Donna Hazel (PEP) ; 
3. Gay Biugin (PRP). 

Trampoline — 1. Peggy Wilson (TC) ; 2. Janet Jones (I) ; 3. 
Fay Williams (PRP). 

Uneven bars — 1. Gay Fleener (TJ) ; 2. Miss Meredith (TJ) ; 
3. Tie between Miss Clark (TJ) and Betty Elam (I). 

All-around— 1. Miss Clark iTJ) ; 2. Miss Meredith (TJ) ; 
3. Miss Kincaid (I). 



1966-67 ANNUAL REPORT 

(Continued from Page One) 

Nabb, and one hundred seventeen football officials 
took the National Federation examination for the 
higher ratings. Of this niunber, tv/enty-eiglit were 
added to the Certified list, and there were fifty-two 
officials on the Approved list. Charlie Vettiner con- 
ducted fifteen baslietball clinics, and held the School 
for Basl\etball Officials. Harry Stephenson conducted a 
school for baseball officials. Regional representatives 
in the three sports mentioned continue to render a fine 
service to the officials and schools in their respective 
areas. One hundred twenty-five officials took the 
National Federation basketball e.xamination, with elev- 
en being added to the Certified list and sixty-one re- 
ceiving the Approved rating. 

It has not been necessary to suspend any member 
schools from the Association during the current school 
year. Three schools were placed on probation, having 
been judged guilty of violating the Association's 
Sportsmanship Rule, By-Law 17. 

The number of schools maintaining football in 
1966-67 was the same as that of a year ago, 173. The 
numbers of schools maintaining the other sports spon- 
sored by the Association show no appreciable change 
from the preceding year with the exception of gym- 
nastics, a new sport for the K.H.S.A.A. Twelve schools 
sent teams in boys' gymnastics to the State Gymnas- 
tics Meet which was held in Louisville on April 1. 
Nine schools were represented by girls' teams. The 
number of teams in other sports are: baseball, 300; 
basketball, 361; cross country, 105; boys' golf, 135; 
girls' golf, 26; rifle marksmanship, 12; boys' swim- 
ming, 32; girls' swimming, 26; boys' tennis, 75; girls' 
tennis, 41; boys' track, 204; girls' track, 95; wres- 
tling, 21. 

Fifty-six member schools of the Kentucky High 
School Athletic Association have made contributions to 
the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame. Of 
this number, forty-one have made contributions of 
$100.00 each, or have made pledges for this amount. 
The National Hall of Fame Committee has asked the 
K.H.S.A.A. to set a goal of $100.00 for each of its 
member schools, and this goal has been accepted. The 
Board of Control has directed the Commissioner to 
solicit Association member schools in an effort to meet 
the goal mentioned. Anything that members of this 
Delegate Assembly can do in their respective districts 
to assist the administrators and coaches in meeting 
the goal will be appreciated. 

Your continued cooperation, assistance, and con- 
structive criticism are solicited. 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MAY, 1967 



Page Five 



K.H.S.C.A. 

MINUTES OF ANNUAL MEETING 

The annual meeting of the Kentucky High School 
Coaches Association was held at 1:00 p.m. in Room 
104 of the Convention Center, Louisville, Ky., on April 
13, 19S7. The number of member coaches present 
was 135. 

Officers of the K.H.S.C.A. present were: Fred 
Clayton, president; Don Morris, vice president; Joe 
Ohr, secretary-treasurer; and Butch Gilbert, sergeant 
at arms. 

The meeting was called to order by President 
Clayton, and Tommy Long of Allen County High 
School gave the invocation. 

President Clayton entertained a motion that since 
the minutes of the association had appeared in The 
ATHLETE that they be dispensed with. On motion by 
Corky Cox of LaRue County and seconded by Mickey 
Walker of LaRue County the motion carried. 

Secretary-Treasurer Joe Ohr gave a detailed finan- 
cial report to the assembly and on motion by Bob 
Miller, Campbell County, and seconded by Estill Bran- 
ham, Warren County, the financial report was ac- 
cepted. 

Bill Furgerson, football coach of Murray State 
University, was presented to the coaches by Fred 
Clayton, president of the association and football coach 
of Caldwell County High School. 

Coach Furgerson opened his remarks by paying 
tribute to his predecessor, saying that one doesn't 
change programs by changing coaches. Furgerson 
says that he copies anything that he thinks can be 
useful to his method of coaching. 

He supplied the coaches with the following infor- 
mation and issued a challenge to the persons in the 
coaching profession: 

Today, 19,622 high schools are playing basketball; 
674,938 high school boys are playing baskteball, 13,309 
high schools are playing football; 622,681 high school 
boys are playing football. 

Furgerson used a quote by Bob Cousy, "The 
best basketball minds in the world are the high school 
coaches." Furgerson stated that the caliber of athletes 
in Kentucky is better today than in any previous year. 
He especially cited the Hopkinsville football team and 
Fleming Thornton the coach, reminding those in the 
meeting that the Hoptown team was recognized as the 
fourth best high school team in the nation during the 
1966 season. Coach Furgerson said that "the real 
champion is the person whose heart can be educated." 
In closing, the Murray mentor challenged the coaches 
to dare the boys — dare them to do the best that is 
within them, and also stated: "If you don't like your 
job of coaching, then quit; but if you stay in coaching 
then do your best." 

Bob Miller, football coach of Canrpbell County, 
who represented the K.H.S.C.A. at the annual rules 
meeting held in Des Moines last Januaiy, gave a 
report concerning his attendance and called attention 
to the major rule changes for 1967. 

Fleming Thornton, coach of the Hopkinsville elev- 
en, champions of AA Class in football for 1966. was 
recognized as "Coach of the Year." He was also 
Pepsi-Cola Coach of the Year in Kentucky. For being 
selected, Thornton was presented a gold football trophy 
by Fred Clayton. Thornton expressed his gratitude to 
the patrons and the administration of Hopkinsville for 
their support. 

Bob Fox, coach of the state champion Earhngton 
team, was elected "Coach of the Year" by his fellow 



In Memoriam 




JAMES C. BRUCE 

James C. Bruce, principal of Durrett High School 
in Jefferson County since 1953, died unexpectedly on 
April S, 1967. A native of Leitchfield, Mr. Bruce had 
been with the Jefferson County school system for 
thirty-eight years. 

"Charlie" Bruce, whose college work had been 
taken at Western Kentucky University and the Univer- 
sity of Kentucky, taught and coached at the Okolona 
High School during the 1929-33 period. He started 
Okolona's first athletic program during that time. In 
1933 Mr. Bruce went to the Camp Taylor Elementaiy 
School as principal, where he remained until 1953. In 
September of 1953 Mr. Bruce became principal of the 
Durrett High School. 

Mr. Bruce was a member of numerous professional 
organizations. For ten years he was a registered foot- 
ball official with the Kentucky High School Athletic 
Association, and was an active member in the Falls 
Cities Football Officials Association. A friend of Mr. 
Bruce in educational work said of him: "Jefferson 
County has lost an outstanding educator and one who 
was truly interested in young people." 

coaches in basketball. It was announced that Fox 
polled one of the highest votes in the history of the 
K.H.S.C.A. The 1966-67 awaixi was presented by James 
Bazzell, retiring president of the association. 

Joe Ohr, present secretary-treasurer, was nomi- 
nated by Paul Young, St. Xavier, and Bob Miller of 
Campbell County seconded the nomination. Ohr was 
elected without opposition for the year 1968-1969. 

Four coaches were nominated for the sergeant- 
at-arms office: Paul Young, Millian Perpich, Bob Fox 
and Jock Sutherland. In a count vote. Bob Fox of 
Earlington was elected to take office at the annual 
meeting in 1968. 

Garnis Martin, Bardstown, offered a proposal that 

everyone selected for the football and basketball teams 

in the All-Star games, sponsored by the Kentucky High 

School Coaches Association be permitted to play a 

(Continued on Page Eleven) 



Page Six 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MAY, 1967 



1967 Kentucky State High School Swimming Meet 

Plantation Club, Louisville, Kentucky, February 24-25, 1967 
TEAM SCORING — CLASS "AAA" BOYS 



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Westport 

St. Xavier 

Atherton 

Covington Catholic. 

Henry Clay 

Paul Blazer 

Tates Creek 

Waggener 

Paducah Tilghman. 
Newport Catholic... 

Fern Creek 

FrankUn County ... 
Bi-yan Station 



32 
26 
20 
22 
24 
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23 


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26 

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20 

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4 

18 

10 



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276 

243 

208 

135 

100 

55 

46 

36 

35 

21 

20 

16 

S 





1. 200 Yard Medley Relay— 

1. Trinity (Wright, Pursley, Per- 
ry, Sherman) 1:45.3 

2. Westport (Gold, Hutt, Jordan 
Waterfilll 1 :50.3 

3. Covington Catholic (Kendig, 
Koors. Guenther, Seely) 1 :50.7 

4. Atherton (Neal. Prather, Bohan- 

on, Neurath) 1:52.3 

5. St. Xavier (Englert, Marlatt, 
LeMaster, Handleman) 1 :52.6 

B. Tates Creek (McAlister, Lash- 

orne. D. Quick, B. Quick) 1:67.8 

Trinity set a new state record in this 
event with the time of 1:45.3. 



4. 200 Yard Individual Medley— 



2. 200 Yard Freestyle— 

1. J. Hartye, Trinity 1 

2. B. Tinglev, Atherton 1 

3. L. Ebersold, Trinity 1 

A. Hill, Westport 2 

S. Weston, Atherton 2 

P. Daniels, Trinity 2 



4. 
S. 
6. 



Hartye set a new state record in 
event with his time of 1 :52.2. 

3. 50 Yard Freestyle— 

1. M. Smith, Westport 

2. B. Handleman St. Xavier 

3. D. Neal, Atherton 

4. M. O'Connell. St. Xavier 

5. Perry, Trinity 

6. C. Sherman. Trinity 



:62.2 
:53.0 
:59.4 
:01.2 
:01.5 
:03.9 

this 



23.2 
23.4 
24.1 
24.6 
24.6 
24.6 



P. Schuler, St. Xavier 2:08.5 

M. Kute, St. Xavier 2:09.7 

S. Wright, Trinity 2:09.9 

G. Hutt, Westport 2:11.6 

T. Pursley. Trinity 2 :16.1 



Englert. St. Xavier 



2:16.2 



Fancy Diving — 

Tony Rueff. St. Xavier 

T. Weiskittel, Covington Cath. 

D. Wilkinson, St. Xavier 

S. Blume, St. Xavier 

J. Finn, Covington Cath. 

M. Mighell. Westport 

100 Yard Butterfly— 

M. Pocock, Westport 

D. Pursley, Trinity 

S. Watkins, Henry Clay 

J. Lowry, Franklin County 

D. Perry, Trinity 

L. Bohannon, Atherton 



.430.85 
332.15 
.323.00 
.312.55 
.297.75 
.278.65 



100 Yard Freestyle— 

p. Schulpr, St. Xavier 

M. Smith. Westport 

T. Redmond, Trinity 

D. Guenther, Covington Cath. 

C. Sherman, Trinity 

M. Seely, Covington Cath. 

100 Yard Backstroke 

B. Tingley, Atherton 

S. Wright, Trinity 

R. Goff. Newport Catholic 



57.2 
57.9 
58.8 
59.9 
00.2 
00.6 



51.4 
51.6 
52.7 
53.8 
54.0 
54.4 



57.7 
68.1 
59.8 



4. Englert, St. Xavier 1:02.9 

5. D. Goff, Westport 1:03.5 

6. Callahan. Trinity 1:05.9 

Tingley set a new state record in this 

event with his time of :57.7. 

9. 400 Yard Freeestyle— 

1. M. Pocock, Westport 4:05.6 

2. J. Hartye, Ti-inity 4:05.8 

3. M. Kute, St. Xavier 4:14.4 

4. S. Bethune, Westport 4:22.3 

5. G. Bryant, Waggener 4:23.3 

6. D. Guenther, Covington Cath. —4:26.0 

10. 100 Yard Breaststroke— 

1. D. Purslev. Trinity 1 :03.7 

2. G. Hutt, Westport 1 :06.3 

3. T. Pui-sley. Trinity 1:09.4 

4. Lvnch, Westport 1:09.6 

5. m'. Kooi-s. Covington Cath. 1 :10.2 

6. Winn, Blazer 1:10.5 

11. 400 Yard Freestyle Relay— 

1. Westport (Jordan. Kleinhans, 
Pocock, Smith! 3:31.1 

2. St. Xavier (O'Connell, Kute, 
Schuler. Handleman) 3:32.1 

3. Trinity (Hartye, Redmond, Dan- 
iels, Ebersold) 3:32.6 

4. Atherton (Bohannon, Hennessey, 
Weston, Tingley) 3:42.3 

5. Henry Clay (Harvey, Watkins, 
Clay, Taliaferro) -_-3:45.9 

6. Waggener (Heckenkamp, Schill- 
ing, Morrow, Bryant) 3 :51.3 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MAY, 1967 



Page Seven 



TEAM SCORING — CLASS "AAA" GIRLS 

























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Sacred Heart Acad. 


26 


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Henrv Clav 


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S 







1. 200 Yard Medley Relay— 

1. Westport (Sprigg. Showalter, 
Richardson, Wright) 2:06.3 

2. Sacred Heart (Jarrell, Englert, 
Struss, Wagner) 2:08.7 

3. Henry Clay (Bolton, Harvey, 
Kessinger. Sutherland) 2:09.4 

4. Bryan Station (Blythe. Bradley, 
Gardner, Wasson) 2:10.8 

5. Atherton (Gerry Gustafson, 
Hennessey, Prather) 2:12.8 

6. Paul Blazer (Hartman, Winn 

Eli, Wade) 2:14.4 

2. 200 Yard Freestyle- 



shields, Eastern 2:05.3 

Watt, Sacred Heart Acad. ..2:08.1 

Kessinger, Henry Clay 2:11.3 

Bell, Atherton 2:13.1 

Henderson, Westport 2:20.2 

Henderson, Westport 2:28.9 



Shields set a new state record in this 
event with her time of 2 :05.3. 



I. 


S. 


2. 


K 


3. 


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4. 


B. 


5. 


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6. 


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3. 50 Yard Freestyle 



Blythe, Bryan Station 

Henderson, Westport 

Bolton, Henry Clay 

Saalfeld, Notre Dame Acad. 

Gruneisen, Sacred Heart Acad. 

Branch, Notre Dame Acad. 



1. 


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27.0 
27.0 
27.4 
27.9 
28.6 
28.8 



I Yard Individual Medley— 

Wright, Westport 2:30.3 

Lawrence, Westport 2 :30.7 

Blaske, Westport 2:31.7 

K. Struss, Sacred Heart Acad. -.2:32.6 



H. Waddell. Pleasure Ridge Pk. 2:37.8 
L. Gardner, BiTan Station 2:39.1 



9. 400 Yard Freestyle 



5. Fancy Diving — 



1. B. Barrows, Westport 369.25 

2. D. Brown, Westport 295.30 

3. B. Besten, Henry Clay 226.45 

4. C. Ridge, Sacred Heart Acad. ..217.15 

5. N. Curtis, Westport 204.35 

B. N. Abraham. Westport 191.45 



6. 10D Yard Butterfly- 



1. 


S. 





P. 


3. 


S. 


4. 


C. 


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1. 


6. 


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Shields, Eastern 1 

Henderson, Westport 1 

Lawrence, Westport 1 

Struss, Sacred Heart Acad. 1 

Jarrell, Sacred Heart Acad. — 1 
Hai-vey, Henry Clay 1 



in 



02.9 

06.0 
09.6 
10.3 
10.8 
13.1 

this 



Shields set a new state record 
event with her time of 1 :02.9. 

7. 100 Yard Freestyle— 

1. L. Hendei-son, Westport 1:01.1 

2. B. Henderson, Westport 1:02.4 

3. J. Jarrell, Sacred Heart Acad. ..1:03.7 

4. D. Wade, Blazer 1:03.7 

5. M. Hoffer. Notre Dame Acad. -1:05.1 

6. L. Gruneisen, Sac. Heart Acad. 1 :05.5 



8. 100 Yard Backstroke— 

1. T. Bolton, Heni-y Clay 1:05.2 

2. K. Wyatt. Sacred Heart Acad. 1:09.0 
i. M. Blaske, Westport 1:09.7 

4. S. Sprigg, Westport 1:11.0 

5. D. Showalter, Westport 1:11.6 

6. A. Neyer, Blazer 1:12.6 



B. Bell, Atherton 4:36.8 

K. Kessinger. Heni-y Clay 4:42.6 

M. Bell, Sacred Heart Acad. 5:02.2 

J. Hill. Westport 5:10.5 

K. Stanback, Tates Creek 5:19.4 

P. Dunn, Blazer 5:38.1 



Bell set a new state record in this 
event with her time of 4:36.8. 



10. 100 Yard Breaststroke— 



1. A. Wright, Westport 1:12.7 

2. G. Gustafson, Atherton 1:14.8 

3. L. Richardson, Westport 1:18.2 

4. R. A. Englert, Sac. Heart Acad. 1 :18.2 

5. K. Kessinger, Tates Creek 1:19.1 

6. R. Jarrell, Sacred Heart Acad. ..1:23.2 

Wright set a new state record in this 
event with her time of 1:12.7. 



11. 400 Yard Freestyle Relay— 

1. Westport (L. Henderson, Law- 
rence, Blaske, P. Henderson) 4:05.8 

2. Sacred Heart (Gruneisen, Jarrell, 
Bell. Wyatt) 4:11.5 

:;. Notre Da-ne (Saalfeld. Hoffer, 

Branch, Henneken) 4:32.3 

4. Tates Creek (Stanback, Wides, 
White, Kessinger) 4:42.5 

5. Atherton (Motor, Welsh, Con- 
way, Bell) 4:43.1 

6. Paducah Tilghman (Memer, Brei- 
dert. Smith, Anderson) 4 :5S.5 



Bolton set a new state record 
event with her time of 1 :05.2. 



in thii 



Westport .set a new state record in this 
event with the time of 4:05.8. 



Page Eight 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MAY, 1967 



University of Kentucky Coliseum, Lexington, Kentucky, March 24-25, 1967 
TEAM SCORING — CLASS "AA" BOYS 





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179 


Hopkinsville 


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54 


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50 


Murray 











16 





13 











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32 


Frankfort 




18 


12 































20 




10 


32 


Shplhwille 


28 


Woodwood County. . 


14 


























2 





16 



1. 200 Yard Medley Relay— 

1. Dixie Heights (Rabe, Kalb, 

Smith, Taglauer) 1 :56.7 

2. Hopkinsville (Dorrah, Harpe, 
Cayce, Mahoney) 1 :B7.8 

3. Highlands (Tacke, Kennedy, 
Grimm, Jones) 1 :58.7 

4. Foi-t Knox (Payne, Watson, 
Tickman, Cechet) 2:02.2 

5. Beechwood (Hughes, Castleman, 
Schmidt, Ries) 2:15.0 

6. Shelbyville (Guthrie, Caudill, 
Hudley, Hardesty) 2 :47.2 



4. 200 Yard Individual Medley— 9. 400 Yani Freestyle 



2. 200 Yard Freestyle— 

1. Lee Bezold, Highlands 1:60.4 

2. Steve Ramsey, Good Shepherd„2 :08.2 

3. Hank Thompson, Frankfort 2:11.1 

4. Kevin Carroll, Fort Knox 2:14.3 

5. Paul Dorrah, Hopkinsville 2 :15.4 

6. Walt Park. Model 2:21.8 

Bezold set a new state record ip this 
event with his time of 1:50.4. 



3. 50 Yard Freestyle— 

1. Granville Cayce, Hopkinsville 

2. Marshall Hardy, Lou. Cty. Day 

3. Tom Grimm, Highlands 

3. Ken Taglauer, Dixie Heights 

5. Ken Grimm, Highlands 

6. Forest Hume, Model 



24.2 
2B.2 
26.1 
26.2 
26.2 
26.6 



1. Ken Battle, Murray 

3. Charlie Smith. Dixie Heights — 

3. Butch Phister, Highlands 

4. Happy Higgins, Hopkinsville _ 

5. Rick Rickman, Fort Knox 

6. Bert Cornelison, Model 

5. Fancy Diving — 

1. Jeff Tull, Hopkinsville 

2. Terry Rankin, Model 

3. Charlie Smith. Dixie Heights _ 

4. Mike Rice, Highlands 

5. Ken Le Vasseur, Ft. Knox 

G. Joe Chase, Ft. Knox 



-2:18.5 

_243.8B 
.2:37.9 
.2:39.1 
-2 :42.3 
_2:49.5 



.279.95 
.258.00 
.243 85 
.220.05 
.218.25 
.213.85 



1. Mike Blaske, Lou. Cty. Day ..4:33.7 

2. Paul Dorroh, Hopkinsville 5:01.1 

3. Rick Rickman. Ft. Knox 5:17.2 

4. Kevin Sarring. Highlands 6:18.1 

5. John Pettengil, Model 5:25.0 

6. Mike Havlick. Highlands 5:32.4 

Blaske set a new state record in this 
event with his time of 4:33.7. 

10. 100 Yard Breaststroke— 



6. 100 Yard Butterfly— 

1. Lee Bezold, Highlands 

2. Ken Battle, Murray 

3. Steve Ramsey, Good Shepherd . 

4. Charles Kalb, Dixie Heights . 

5. Mac Kennedy. Highlands 

6. Bert Cornelison, Model 

7. 100 Yard Freestyle— 

1. Marshall Hardy. Lou. Cty. Day. 

2. Kevin Carroll, Fort Knox 

3. Ken Taglauer, Dixie Heights . 

4. Forest Hume, Model 

5. John Ross, Highlands 

G. Happy Higgins, Hopkinsville . 

8 100 Yard Backstroke— 



Cayce set a new state record in this 5. 
event with his time of :24.2. 6. 



Richard Babe, Dixie Heights . 

Tim Racke, Highlands 

John Payne, Fort Knox 

Denny Hunter, Highlands 

Granville Cayce, Hopkinsville. 
Tom Dorroh, Hopkinsville 



. :55.9 
- 58.9 
.1:04.2 
.1 :08.2 
.1:12.4 
.1 :14.6 



. :57.4 
. :68.0 
. :68.6 
.1 :00.7 
.1:01.2 
.1:01.6 



.1 :05.9 
.1:10.9 
.1:11.0 
.1:11.2 
.1:12.4 
.1:13.1 



1. Richard Rabe, Dixie Heights — 1 

2. Hank Thompson, Frankfort — 1 

3. Charlie Kalb, Dixie Heights — 1 

4. Mike Watson, Fort Knox 1 

5. Mac Kennedy, Highlands 1 

6. Butch Phister, Highlands 1 



10.2 
12.2 
12.3 
13.9 
14.1 
14.9 



11. 400 Yard Freestyle Relay— 



1. Highlands (Jones, Ross, Grimm, 
Bezold) 

2. Fort Knox (Carroll, Goden- 
schwager, M. Watson, A. 
Cechet) 

3. Hopkinsville (Cayce, Nichol, 
Higgins, Mahoney) 

4. Louisville Cty. Day (Block, 
Burgiss, VonBorries, Segur- 
burg) 

5. Model (McKinney, T. Hume, 
Overcasli, F. Hume) 

G. Good Shepherd (Snelling, D. 
Ramsey, Mucci, S. Ramsey) — 



.3 :51.9 

.4:02.6 
.4:10.0 

,4:17.1 
.4 :19.4 
.4:24.0 



Highlands set a new state record in 
this event with the time of 3 :51.9. 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MAY, 1967 



Page Nine 



TEAM SCORING — CLASS "AA" GIRLS 



TEAM 









ro w 






S'S 






S(5 



73 ID 

SB 



T! O 









O 

Is 






?^ a, 



Highlands 

Model 

Hopkinsville 

Fort Knox 

Beechwood 

Dixie Heights . . . . 

Frankfort 

Shelbyville , 

Murray 

Sayre 

Bourbon County. 
Woodford County- 
Margaret Hall . . 



32 

20 

26 

22 

14 

24 



10 







23 
9 
4 
5 



21 


13 

16 
2 





43 
16 
7 
9 
1 
2 
3 
12 








27 
3 

11 

20 
8 

19 




5 





23 

13 

21 



21 

3 

2 

9 













33 

3 

13 
8 
9 



21 







40 

14 

13 

15 





10 

1 













36 

11 

2 

13 
12 


4 



12 
3 




34 

19 

17 

9 













13 







33 
9 
3 

2 

12 

10 
1 


16 


7 



32 

20 

26 

18 

14 

10 

24 

22 













356 

134 

133 

124 

80 

79 

70 

59 

34 

32 

32 

11 

7 



1. 200 Yard Medley Relay— 

1. Highlands (Jones, Donna Reed, 
Stivers, Debbie Reed) 2:10.3 

2. Hopkinsville (Higgins, Wiggins, 
Primrose, Van Metre) 2:24.8 

3. Dixie Heights (Mineer, Tag- 
lauer. Herold, Beckert) 2:25.0 

4. Fort Knox (Landei-s, L. Greene, 

S. Greene, LeVasseur) 2:25.7 

5. Model (Stoll, Wimberly, Boch, 
Wiggins) 2 :30.6 

6. Beechwood (S. Zeidler, Daren- 
kamp, P. Zeidler, Crouch) 2:31.5 

In the trials Highlands set a new state 
record in this event with the time of 
2:07.5. 



2. 200 Yard Freestyle— 

1. Lloyd Ireland, Sayre 2.17.4 

2. Anne Battle, Murray 2:23.0 

3. Bill Stivers, Highlands 2:23.6 

4. Ann Thompson, Frankfort 2:36.2 

5. Laura Williams, Frankfort 2:40.0 

6. Janet Bock, Model 2:42.1 

Ireland set a new state record in this 
event with her time of 2:17.4. 



4. 20O Yard Individual Medley— 8. 100 Yard Backstroke— 



1. Laurel Greene, Ft. Knox 2:38.1 

2. Donna Reed, Highlands 2:45.8 

3. Susan Klausing, Highlands 2:50.7 

4. Pam Wiggins, Hopkinsville 2:51.3 

5. Derla Herold, DUic Heights -.3:03.5 

6. Susan Taglauer, Dixie Heights— 3 :07.0 

Greene set a new state record in this 
event with her time of 2 :38.I. 

5. Fancy Diving — 

1. Mary Jane Stress, Highlands— 248.60 

2. Sue Ann Hounchell, Model 246.80 

3. Suzanne Higgins, Hopkinsville 216.95 

4. Betsy Eddy, Beechwood 211.85 

5. Judy Keller, Beechwood 202.10 

6. Mary Smith, ShelbyviUe 171.20 



6. 100 Yard Butterfly— 

1. Anne Battle, Murray 

2. Sharon Greene, Ft. Knox 

3. Susan Klausing, Highlands — 

4. Maggie Battle, Murray 

5. Kay Sarring, Highlands 

(). Derla Herold, Dixie Heights - 



Battle set a new state record In this 
event with her time of 1 :10.3. 



3. 50 Yard Freestyle— 

1. Debbie Reed, Highlands 

2. Janet Kiel, Highlands 

3. Nancy Shannon, Shelbyville 

4. Sally Wiggins, Model 

5. Kay Sarring, Highlands 

6. Mary LeVasseur, Ft. Knox 



Reed set a new state record in this 
event with her time of :27.0. 





10.3 




15.4 




18.4 




22.7 


_1 


22.3 


_l 


27.1 



27.0 


1. 


29.5 


2. 


30.7 


3. 


30.7 


4. 


31.5 


5. 


32.6 


6. 



7. 100 Yard Freestyle 



Debbie Reed, Hig:hlands 1 

Laurel Greene, Ft. Knox 1 

Janet Kiel. Highlands 1 

Sue Wimberly, Model 1 

Laura Williams, Frankfort — 1 
Judy VanMetre, Hopkinsville — 1 



00.6 
04.0 
08.1 
08.3 
09.0 
10.5 



1. Nancy Jones, Highlands 1 

2. Sharon Greene, Ft. Knox 1 

3. Sally Zeidler, Beechwood 1 

4. Lucy Cecil, Highlands 1 

5. Kathy Stoll. Model 1 

6. Mary Klausing, Highlands 1 



9. 400 Yard Freestyle 



11.8 
16.4 
21.0 
21.8 
22.5 
23.4 



1. Jill Stivers, Highlands 5:22.4 

2. Cissie Gibson, Bourbon Co. 5 :41.6 

3. Janet Bock, Model 5:51.3 

4. Nancy Bernardini, Highlands 6 :13.0 

5. Debbie Drury, Hopkinsville 6 :15.9 

6. Julie LeVasseur, Ft. Knox 6:34.5 

10. 100 Yard Breaststroke— 



Lloyd Ireland, Sayre 1.14.1 



Donna Reed, Highlands 1 

Sue Taglauer, Dixie Heights 1 

Sue Guest, Highlands 1 

Ann Thompson, Frankfort 1 

Sue Wimberly, Model 1 



20.0 
23.1 
26.3 
28.3 
29.6 



Reed set a new state record in this 
event with her time of 1 :00.6. 



Ireland set a new state record in this 
event with her time of 1:14.1. 

11. 400 Yard Freestyle Relay— 

1. Highlands (Kiel, Klausing 

Cecil. Jones) 4:35.8 

2. Hopkinsville (Wiggins. Munday, 
Primrose. Van Metre) 4 :53.9 

3. Frankfort (L. William, K. 
Williams, Brooks, Thompson) 5 :01.4 

4. Shelbyville (Shannon, Whitaker, 
Guthrie, Amyx) 5 :09.7 

5. Model (Games, Smith, Saylor, 
Robinson) 5 :15.0 

6. Fort Knox (M. LeVasseur, 
Landers, KruU, J. LeVasseur) 5:16.4 



Paje Ten 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MAY, 1967 



The Flying Dutchman 

Milestones are fascinating because each seems to 
mark the end of an era and the opening of a new one. 
To the Dutchman milestones are men — great men — 
who have left their footprints in the sands of time. 
Along the sports road the Dutchman has traveled there 
are stones placed by some great leaders and promot- 
ers of wholesome sports for young men and women. 
The National Federation's immortal H. V. Porter 
placed one, Wisconsin's Bud Foster and the New Eng- 
lander Oswald Tower laid two more stones, and now 
another milestone is placed in the west as Colorado's 
John Bunn completes his work as editor of the basket- 
ball rule book and passes the torch on to another 
great guy, Ed Steitz. 

It's not really right to say that John Bunn belongs 
to Colorado because he really belongs to the nation 
where he has served in many areas as coach of his 
beloved game of basketball, as an exponent of clean 
living and physical culture and a constant disciple for 
the improvement of basketball rules and their interpre- 
tations. As editor of the basketball rule book it is hard 
to estimate how much lovers of this sport owe him. 
"Those of you who were not privileged to be his per- 
sonal friend missed knowing a man who has become a 
legend in his own time. The Dutchman served several 
terms with John Bunn on the National Basketball Rules 
Committee of the United States and Canada and can 
only repeat the words of the poet to indciate his 
thoughts. 

"Lives of great men all remind us we can make 
our lives sublime, and departing leave behind us 
footprints on the sands of time." 

You guessed it — John Bunn, who served so well as 
editor of the rule book, is the winner of the Corn Cob 
Pipe of Honor for unselfish service to his fellow men. 
You're a milestoner, John, and the Dutchman doffs 
his hat to you. In your continuing promotions of the 
sport may our paths cross again. 

To have good sports or a good society there must 
be those people properly selected to write the rules and 
laws, and all good Americans must then live by them. 
Neither you nor I am expected to like every law that 
is passed, but we are expected to live by the rules and 
help enforce them until another rule-making session is 
held when they may be amended or rewritten if they 
do not achieve their purpose. 

At a clinic a couple of years ago a rather promi- 
nent official stated that he didn't like a rule and so 
he wouldn't enforce it. In that brief moment this fel- 
low lost the respect of the rest of the coaches and 
officials present. Sports must have rules. There can 
be no games unless there are men to officiate them 
and men to write the rules. So it is that the Dutchman 
salutes the National Basketball Rules Committee for 
excellent service rendered in Louisville this March 
when the rules for 1987-1968 were written. 

Sherman Gish, President of the K.H.S.A.A. Board 
of Control, did a superb job in the handling of the big 
(and it reaUy is) banquet at the Brown Hotel during 
K.E.A. Personable Sherman kept things moving so 
well that all this Dutchman heard were complimentcuy 
remarks of amazement. More than 500 people were 
served, the Game Guy presentation made, a principal 
speaker heard and cdl in one hour and forty-two min- 
utes. When the Board of Control convenes this summer 
on the warm Hawaiian sands at the National Federa- 
tion's Convention, would you please have the western 
Kentuckian preside at the Luaus? 

A letter has just come from one of the greatest of 




I 



IHii DUTCHMAN 

all of the southern gentlemen — Cliff Harper of Ala- 
bama. Formerly Commissioner of the Alabama High 
School Athletic Association, "big, likeable Cliff" is 
now the assistant commissioner of the Southeastern 
Conference, Cliff paid the K.H.S.A.A. basketball offi- 
cials a compliment when he said, "In the recruitment 
ol nlficials I lespect those trained in your program." 
When the Dutchman left Birmingham last week several 
Kentuckians were being considered f^T certification in 
the Soutlijastern, and one was Beechmont s Jerry 
ICJmme! 

We're out of the basketball season now and believe 
me when I say that the golf being played by Kentuck- 
ians is attrai'ting attention. Gay Brewer, Bobby Nichols 
and Frank Beard are now joined by Bowling Green's 
Paul Walkei and Frankfort's Don "Dopey" Phelps. At 
the recent parks and recreation conference in B^nning- 
ham thes" two Kentuckian3 won tournaments. Here's 
a tip for a" ^^olfers — if your score goes over 100 worry 
about your golf; if it goes under 70 worry about y;)ur 
job. 

Morehead College has bought a j,olf course and 
the new pr.i is Eddie Bignon. Lexin^:;ton's Idle Hour 
Country Club has lost its assistant pro, Car] Owen, 
who is now the pro at the Chenoweth Park G^lf C'ourse 
which Jefferson County will open in July. 

A letter from Coach Bill Clark of Somcset indi- 
cates how much the Kentucky High School Athlete 
means to people all over Kentuckj. Bill mentions that 
he ran across an old 193ii! i^sue of trte Athlete which 
contained information on one of the first clinics. That 
was so long ago liiat Bill poniis out that he had one 
assistant and coached all sports while nov^' Somerset 
has ten coaches. The recreation program under Bill 
Clark in the briar-jumper city is growing just as fast. 
This is another feather in this fellow's hat. Incidental- 
ly, he may soon bei-^me a;; Indian Chief. 

From Cliff Fagan, Executive Secretary of the 
National Federation of State High School Athletic As- 
sociations, comes word that the Oregon School Activi- 
ties Association included an e.xcerpt from the Flying 
Dutchman in the April-May edition. Cliff says that it 
pleased the National Federation very much because 
the excerpt was picked up from a recent issue of the 
National Press which he edits. Thanks, Qiff, the 
Dutchman is flattered. 

Courtney Clark writes that Ernie Chattin, wJio is 
prominent as a sports broadcaster in the Ashland area, 
will have Mr. Clark's son, "Jeep" Clark, on his pro- 
gram shortly. Eastern Kentuckians should listen for 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MAY, 1967 



Page Eleven 



HIGHLANDS HIGH SCHOOL BOYS' SWIMMING TEAM 
KENTUCKY CLASS AA CHAMPION— 1967 







1 . I , ! • 





Front Row: Jones, T. Grimm, Miernerey, Bathiany. Lukens, King, Coach Jones. Second Row: 
Phister, R. Grover, Miller, Benton, Sarring, Voige, Long. Ader. Third Row: Collier, Racke, K. 
Rice, Kennedy, Hunter, J. Grover. 



this because "Jeep" Clark, who is in his third 
year as assistant coach at the University ot Southern 
Mississippi, is one of Kentucky's finest atiiletes. 

As the Dutchman closes out his last coluiin; until 
August, he urges every county in the Commotiwealth 
to get a recreation and parks program ready for your 
people whether they be 3 or 93. This is an inves-mcnt 
and not an expenditure of public funds. 

Here is a little philosophy passed on to you from 
Phillip Brooks: "The true way to be humble is not to 
stoop until you are smaller than yourself, but to stand 
at your real height against some higher nature that 
will .show you what the real smallness of your great- 
ness is." 



K.H.S.C.A. 

(Continued from Page Five) 

minimum of time. Martin was assured that the execu- 
tive committee would take his proposal under consid- 
eration. 

It was announced by Paul Young, athletic director 
of St. Xavier, that in the future the L.I.T. Tournament 
in Louisville would honor coaches' cards for admittance 
to games. 

Coaciies Joe Ohr and Estill Branham were pre- 
sented plaques for ten years of service with the asso- 
ciation and work with the AU-Star games. 

There being no further business, the meeting ad- 
journed at 2:30 p.m. 

Joe Ohr 
Secretary-Treasurer 



REPORTS OF AUDIT 

Irvine, Kentucky 
April 11. 1967 
Executive Committee 

Kentucky High School Coaches Association 
Louisville. Kentucky 
Gentlemen : 

At the request of Mr. Joe Ohr, your Association Secretary, 
I have examined the records furnished me by Mr. Ohr, and 
covering the period February 26, 1966 to February 8, 1967. 
All transactions during this period are shown on the 
attached schedule of receipts and disbursements. All receipts 
have been traced into the Bank Account and all disbursements 
have been verified by canceled checks. 

The balance of $10,596.22 has been confirmed as being on 
deposit in the Union Bank & Trust Company, Irvine, Ken- 
tucky, on February 8. 1967. 

Respectfully submitted, 
William Sexton, Jr., Auditor 

KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL COACHES ASSOCIATION 
STATEMENT OF RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS FOR 
THE PERIOD February 26. 1966 to February 8, 1967 
Bank Balance in Union Bank & Trust Company, 

Irvine. Kentucky, on February 26, 1966 $10,094.65 

RECEIPTS: 

Membership Dues $ 1.741.00 

Grant from KHSAA 500.00 

Grant from KHSAA 500.00 

Total Receipts 2,241.00 

GRAND TOTAL $12,335.65 

DISBURSEMENTS: 

The Estill Herald, printing 79.30 

Irvine Postmaster, postage stamps „_ 125.00 

Mrs. Naomi Sheckler, secretary 10.00 

Joe Ohr. collection fees 407.25 

Sexton Ins. Agency, audit report 20.00 

Joe Ohr, delegate expense to K.E.A. 25.00 

Sports Center, Coach of v.>-*- \w--Hs lOS 15 

Sexton Ins. Agency, treasurer bond 31.25 

Ky. State Treasurer, filing fee 2.00 

Jock Sutherland, clinic speaker 50.00 

Jim Richards, clinic speaker 50.00 

Gene Rhodes, clinic speaker 50.00 

Ron Cain, clinic speaker 50.00 

Walt Green, clinic speaker 50.00 



Page Twelve THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MAY, 1967 

Fleming Thornton, clinic speaker 50.00 

''"'lenl:r°":.."!!"!':'_":!!"".^ !1" 55.76 Postscripts On Athletics 

''""pense"'"' """"''* """""* "" 48.1S By Rhea H. Williams 

Joe Ohr expenses & mileage to AH Editor's Note: The article below appeared in a recent issue 

gj ' 4j Qt) ®^ the Texas Interscholastic Leaguer. Dr. Williams is State 

.lames BazVeir."VxVcuTive"mietin~e~M- ' Athletic Director of the Texas University Interscholastic League. 

penses 45.79 One of the acknowledged purposes, and perhaps the 

?o'e ohrt-corctJorreri,!!- memb«s 435:25 "^°3t important o£ the American public school system, 

IS to educate and develop m the youth of our country 

Total Disbursements 1.739.43 those citizenship traits vvhich will result in a truly 

BALANCE ON FEBRUARY 8, 1967 $10,596.22 democratic American. Many different viewpoints have 

Balance in Union Bank & Trust Company, Irvine, been suggested to best reach this goal. Practically all 

Ky.. per bank statement of Feb. 8, 1967 $10,596.22 educators, howcver, agree that Competitive athletics, 

Irvine, Kentucky properly supervised, offer value in citizenship training 

April 11, 1967 fQ j,g found nowhere else in the school program. 

la^f-wL^^Xn^sur Football & Ba.sketbaii Games of , On the athletic field each student goes through a 

Kentucky High School Coaches Association leavening procesS whlch, in its Citizenship influences, 

Louisville. Kentucky is far-reaching. Here the fact that his father is the 

Gentlemen: ,,..„,,, • j »u local banker is of no consequence, as he must stand 

Upon the request of Mr. Joe Ohr. I have examined the u- i *. j L- -i- ^l 

records of the All Star account from those furnished me by among his teammates and earn his position on the 

Mr. Ohr and covering the period February 14, 1966 to March squad by his personal achievement. The athletic field 

31. 1967. ,,.,.. . , J J. V i equalizes the rich and the poor, the white and the tan. 

Consolidated and classified receipts and disbursements are ,^ x~i l ^ ^ j ^^ ^ /i t ^i ■ ^ 1 

shown on the attached schedule of receipts and disbursements. Ihe Pro.cstant and the Catholic; there exists no class 

The bank balance of $14,340.43 has been verified as being on distinction, no favoritism, no political influence. In 

deposit in the First Security National Bank & Trust Com- (ggj.,., sports a Student makes the first String by what 
pany. Lexington, Kentucky. ' , . . , f. •' . . 

Total receipts of $11,045.50 have been traced into the he Can do On the athletic field, his Competitive spirit, 

bank and all disbursements have been properly substantiated and his ability tO give and take, and fOr nO Other 

by canceled checks. rClSOll 

We have verified by telephone this date balances to your «i I t • 

credit in the following Savings Accounts: TninK, WOrK, Train 

a. Columbia Federal Savings & Loan Associa- In alhletics a Student must think, work and train, 

b. ctntVa?Bar"i''T7usT'^om'p"nV.''Lx?ngVn.* '■'''■'' "r b^ dropped by the wayside. He must have courage 
Kentucky (Cert. Deposit No. 5041) 10,000.00 Or fail Under hard physical punishment. Occasionally 

c. Citizens Union National Bank & Trust he must risc to supei'human accomplishments, and 
^r''edi't:d"';o li"'"^™' $"-f.S'"'.'!'.__''."'"l^' 5,083.33 how often havo we all seen youth do this in athletic 

H. First Security National Bank & Trust Com- activities. 

pany. I.exinpton. Kentucky (Interest cred- /^|| for One 

The ' baiances"''sholn' a'rf*a"'ofMa;ch"3i7 1967!" unless Team play. Cooperation, Consideration of others, 

otherwise indicated. Working and planning together, the realization that 

We believe the attached schedule properly reflects all trans- gach Is a Spoke in a wheel and that each Spoke mUSt 

actions for the period covered. , ^iiuij*.- c*-ur 3^ 

Respectfully submitted. bear part of the load to win, are some of the funda- 

Wiiliam Sexton, Jr., Auditor mental citizenship traits to be found in athletics. Men- 

l^^r^^ r'^k ^'k^WcIT%\^}h t?Soo\^'^^rc^Ei tal alertness, willingness to sacriHce personally to 

enable all to succeed, are virtues that good athletes 

„, , . , o ■ .^^^9"n^T''"^ . <• .u T> -^j must have or develop. It takes a lot of cooperation 

statement of Receipts and Disbursements for the Period . . \^, , . 

February 14. 1966 to March 31, 1967 lo have Competitive athletics. 
Receipts: Future Leaders 

"'""'i'mo/'''"" '^""^''"' ''"""^ ""''$io!795'.50 An American youth, has within him the com- 

interest on" s'avi'ngs"'Account ' I_ '25o!oo pctitivc Spirit which Separates the aggressive fight- 

er from the one who is content to take things as 

p?u'stBaran« 'riank-on ¥eb7ua7v"li:79"6-6-:::::::'3,3:69o:3S Ihey come. Only by development of this aggressive 

fighting spirit is it possible for human society to move 

GRAND TOTAL $44,735.88 forward. Youths who have objectives and ideals and 

"* Printing ^ '_ $ 320.11 ^r^ willing to get out and fight arc the citizens 01 

Change 1,200.00 tomoiTow who will lead the nation onward and upward 

Traveling Expenses 794.15 (q ^ [^gfjcr lifc. Thcsc will be leaders ot tomorrow upon 

Coaches Salaries 1,000.00 , ,, ,. , e 1. -n j j t 

Managers' Salary 500.00 whom thc future of our counti'y Will depend. In no 

Manager's Expenses 316.90 Other area of the high scliool curriculuoi can leader- 

Piayers'^Awa''rds"'*'" l^l'ls ^^ip, Stewardship, and team work be achieved under 

Medical Expenses— p~iayeri"'IIIIIIIIII 40.00 lifelike conditions as well as In a properly directed 

Kentucky Sales Tax 297.29 athletic program. 

Photographs 64.27 fnnA Mnralo 

First Security Nat-onal Bank & Trust, ^ , , "'""' """^^'^ 

Savings Account 10,000.00 One ot the greatest contributors to an excellent 

Citizens Union National Bank & Trust. high SChool morale is a SUCCCSsful athlCtlC program. 

Centrar'Bink'^r°Trust companyriav: ^''""'''"' By success is meant not necessarily a Championship 

ings Account 10,000.00 team, but one in which everyone is making a sincere 

„.,„.. , „„ ,„^ ,„ effort to the best of his ability. Such efforts develop 

Total Disbursements 30.395.45 ■ j c 11 j ■ • -u n j 01. 

a pride for all concerned in a job well done. Such 

BALANCE ON MARCH 31, 1967 $14,340.43 pride is nccessary to instill good citizenship. The will 

' to do, the will to win, the will to do your best is 

Balance on deposit in First Security National Bank developed tO its maximum through athletics. 
& Trust Company, Lexington, Kentucky, per For All 

Bank Statement of March 31. 1967 -"^-^^'-^ All Students should have some part in an athletic 

program, and all should feel that they are making a 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MAY, 1967 



Paje Thirteen 



THOMAS JEFFERSON H. S. GIRLS' GYMNASTICS TEAM 
1967 K.H.S.A.A. STATE CHAMPIONS 




(Left to Right) Coach Donna Hawkins, Nancy Kaufman, Judy Davis, Sharon Kendal, Vickie Burnett, Charlotte 
Simmons, Donna Meredith, Gay Fleener, LaVerne Sadler, Gloria Clark, Pat Cleveland. Sharon Cook, Ronna 
Howell. 



contribution to the success of their schooL The band 
members, the pep squad member, the students who 
attend pep rallies, the student council committee on 
sportsmanship, etc., are all assisting in creating bet- 
ter school morale and aiding in the school atliletic 
program. No one can honestly say that an athletic 
program is of value only to the participating athletes, 
because if properly carried out, it is excellent citizen- 
ship training for all. 

Learn Values 

Perhaps tlie greatest lesson that youth must learn 
is learned more quickly in athletics than anywhere 
else, that is, the fear of taking a defeat. The ability to 
take defeat, to not alibi, to not blame the officials, is 
inherent to good citizenship. I can truly say that I 
have never heard a high school player blame a defeat 
on an official except in instances where coaches, lay- 
men, or newspapers had first put such an idea in his 
head. The faults in the high school athletic programs 
are not with our students, but with our adults. 

Example 

This column recalls some advice he heard his high 
school coach give one of his heartbroken, sobbing 
teammates after he had dropped a pass which would 
have won the game, which in turn would have won 
the district championship for our high school. It went 
something like this: "Son, you have done your best. 
No one could ask more. You have lost nothing. You 
have gained for yourself an opportunity to understand 
the difference between success and failure, to know 
that failure means that a fellow is knocked down and 
does not get up and go on; and success goes to the 
fellow who, after being knocked down, has the courage 
to get up and go on." 

Success 

Today that young fullback is one of Te.xas' most 
successful businessmen and an outstanding civic leader 
in his community. Such are the citizenship values of 



properly supervised athleticj. Real athletes are made 
of the stuff necessary for future citizens. Our country 
wtll be safe in the.r hands. 



This Is Only Disgusting 

Would you believe — 

The last couple weeks of the basketball season saw 
these incidents in Wisconsin high school gymnasiums: 

A coach pushed or struck an official after a game 
in view of the fans, and the official retaliated with 
flying fists. 

A coach verbally abused an official after a game 
in the dressing room, and the official wound up grab- 
bing the coach by the collar. 

A coach was banished from the gym as the final 
episode of an evening of inability to get along with an 
official. 

And lest you think only coaches get into this grue- 
some spotlight, there also was the case of a couple 
of cheerleaders using their advantageous position on 
the sidelines to scream— virtually at nose's length — at 
the officials. 

This is basketball? This is inter-scholastic athletics? 
This is sportsmanship? This is a good loser? 

No, this is none of these — this is only disgusting! 
It is nothing new, of course, this inability to accept 
decisions of any official and, worse yet, this complete 
disrespect of the man who is charged with the respon- 
sibility of making sure two teams follow the rules in 
their contest to determine a winner. 

And how go the excuses of these "hard losers!" 
You've heard *hem all. those old standbys hke: "He's 
a lousy official" or "He can't keep up with the play 
anymore" or "He just isn't consistent in his calls" or — 
you know the rest of them! 

Nonetheless, whatever the official is like in the 
estimation of t'nose who grope for reasons for losing, 
his responsibility is clear: He's runnin" the game, and 
his decision is final! And the responsibility of the coaoh 
along with his players and the fans — and cheerleaders 



Page Fourteen 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MAY, 1967 



— is clear, too: To accept the decisions and, most of 
all, to respect the official! 

You may think it's hard, even impossible at times. 
But you're wrong! It never must be hard to accept and 
respect an official. You have a right to disagree, even 
a right to get excited— and you even may be right and 
the official may be wrong. But this is irrelevant! An 
official never stops hoping he's right— but right or 
wrong, his decision stands, and he and his decision 
demand our respect and acceptance. 

It's almost funny, in a way— this attitude toward 
officials. If we could depend upon our own integrity, 
we wouldn't even need a referee. But we can't trust 
each other, so we get an official or two to make sure 
everybody is playing the game fairly. 

We can't depend upon our honesty — that's one strike 
on us! But to even top that, we can't respect and ac- 
cept the official we get to keep us honest! That's an- 
other strike on us! 

One more strike and we're out! 

Something to think about during the many months 
between now and next basketball season! Something to 
think about if we believe high school sports are worth 
retaining as one of the vehicles carrying a teenager 
from boyhood to manhood! 

— Wisconsin I.A.A. Bulletin 



Health Education Through Sports 

Sports are now an integral part of our 
American culture. They provide a challenge 
to youth — a chance for adventure, an oppor- 
tunity for physical expression, an intense 
emotional experience. They are especially 
appealing for those who crave a test of self, 
the excitement of competition and identifi- 
cation with fortitude. 

That the absorbing appeal of sports has a 
potent influence within our culture evokes 
no arguments. The emulation of the success- 
ful athlete by youth and even adults is not 
ignored by advertisers; nor should it be 
ignored by educators or anyone else con- 
cerned with sports. 

To illustrate, of 200 students recently 
studied with respect to smoking habits, the 
single most important factor in discourag- 
ing smoking was found to be participation 
in competitive sports. Even regular smokers 
tended to discontinue the habit during the 
sports seasons in which they competed. 

The threat of cancer or emphysema from 
smoking at some remote time may not 
seem relevant to youth. But the old coaching 
adage that smoking "cuts the wind" now 
has research support. Studies also show that 
respiratory illness is far more frequent 
among smokers than nonsmokers. This kind 
of information is meaningful to the aspir- 
ing candidate who understands his need for 
optimum energy. 

The smoking illustration is only one of 
many that could be used to point up certain 
principles of effective health education: 



1. A lifetime of health judgments is 
dependent on an understanding of sound 
concepts that relate to desirable attitudes 
and behavior. 

2. Concepts are more readily transmitted 
to behavior when the theory underlying 
these is shown to be effective in practice. 

3. Correct concepts are more likely to be 
retained if they clearly relate to current 
interests and goals. 

Sports participation is sometimes the first 
opportunity for youth to experience a func- 
tional association of health theory with 
practice. These experiences leave a vivid 
and lasting impression with the sports par- 
ticipant, and interestingly most of the con- 
cepts of healthful living can be found in the 
athletic setting. 

Opportunity to teach the principles of 
personal hygiene, first aid, medical and den- 
tal care, emotional health, nutrition, rest 
and exercise, communicable disease control, 
environmental health, accident prevention, j 
and worthy use of leisure time abounds in m 
sports. The athletic arena can serve as a 
practical laboratory for demonstrating 
meaningful relationship of all the above 
components of health to performance and 
functional living. 

The communication of these principles to j 
the athlete, however, is not automatic mere- -^ 
ly by participation. The educational plan to 
provide functional experiences relating to 
them must be as carefully worked out as the 
game plan. This is a teaching responsibility 
fully as challenging as teaching the sports 
themselves. 

Fortunately coaches, trainers and others 
involved in the supervision of sports have 
valuable allies in this task. A growing num- 
ber of physicians throughout the United 
States and the world are becoming interest- 
ed in the health aspects of sports. They are 
relating their health "know-Jhow" to sports 
participation and the sports setting. 

The educational supervisors of sports have 
the teaching "know-how" as this relates to 
sports. To combine the two — the know-how 
of teaching and the know-how of health — 
for health education through sports requires 
coordination of the health supervision team. 
The physician, the coach, the trainer, and 
other adult leaders must combine their 
know-how to assure sound health concepts 
and effective teaching technics. 

Further, to reach the optimum number of 
young people with the health education and 
other benefits of sports, broad programs for 
both boys and girls are needed. To be most 



J 



THE KENTUCKY fflGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MAY, 1967 



Page Fifteen 



THOMAS JEFFERSON H.S. BOYS' GYMNASTICS TEAM 
1967 K.H.S.AA. STATE CHAMPIONS 




(Left to Right) Steve Oeschlc, Mike Motley. Albert Boykins, Mike Cox, Gary Borders, Kirk Smith. 



effective as a motivating force and for otlher 
values, such programs should include a great 
variety of activities. The more sports that 
are offered., the more likely that the pro- 
gram will catch the interests and meet the 
needs of the greatest possible proportion of 
students. 

Studies of motivation show that the best 
solution to health teaching for adolescents is 
to guide them into activities that require 
zest and will yield them acceptance. Linking 
up health teaching with sports and other 
energy-demanding activities in which young 
people want to excel can pay big educational 
dividends. Youth is a time when acceptance 
in the peer society is all important, and we 
should take full advantage of tihis motivat- 
ing factor. 

The absorbing activities of the sports 
arena furnish us with bright, sharp tools for 
health education. Appropriately used, these 
teaching tools can have a potent influence on 
the health belhavior of young people. They 
can help youth to make intelligent health 
decisions now and all during their lives. 
— Nat'l Fed. and The A.M.A. 



Specialization Can Wait! 

They say that specialization is a land- 
mark of the age in which we live. 

They may say so but there's one segment 
of our civilization which doesn't — at least 
shouldn't — fit the age. 

That segment is high school athletics. 



Specialization is a word which doesn't be- 
long in the high school athlete's dictionary. 
A high school boy may want to develop and 
pursue his own interests in a particular 
sport through a personal program of dedi- 
cation. But he has no business being in- 
volved in a super-saturated year-round or- 
ganized training program in a particular 
sport. He should be led to learn there may 
be other outlets of athletic activity wihich 
will be useful to his total development. Yet, 
it is an unfortunate fact that some bovs in 
our schools today not only are specializing 
but also are receiving guidance to become 
specialists. 

The sport of swimming is an example of 
the questionable and disturbing aspects of 
specialization. More than any other activity 
among WIAA sponsored sports, swimming 
has blossomed into a year-round program. 
Indoor pools, of course, lend themselves to 
being used all seasons of the year. This is 
one of the problems ! And a community, no 
doubt, feels a swimming program should go 
on 12 months of the year in order to justify 
the cost of the pool. And this is another of 
the problems! 

But the biggest problem of all is the too- 
enthusiastic coach who makes stepping- 
stones out of the other two problems and 
develops an over-emphasized swim program. 
This coach, or someone working with or for 
him, has his boys swimming the year-round 
— not just in the winter for the WIAA sea- 
son and in the summer but also in the spring 



Page Sixteen 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MAY, 1967 



and fall in community swim club activities. 

Is such a program serving the best intes- 
ests of the boy? Wouldn't it be better for 
this boy, who is obviously interested in a 
physical outlet the year-round, to channel 
his energies into another area in the fall 
and spring? Isn't it enough to be swimming 
in competition four months in the winter 
and some more in the summer? Doesn't 
cross country or football in autumn and 
tennis, golf, baseball or track in the spring 
have something to offer this boy? 

Swimming may be No. 1 on the list of 
activities contradicting the benefits of a di- 
versified program but other sports are 
creeping in this direction. Tennis with its 
indoor facilities in some areas also is endan- 
gering the contention that a boy should not 
super-dedicate himself to one sport but 
should find other outlets for his athletic 
aspirations if he wants to be active more 
than just one particular season of the year. 

The answer to the problem obviously rests 
with the coach' — the person who not only 
has a close relationship but, much more, a 
powerful influence over the high school boy. 
A boy owes it to himself to diversify his 
physical and athletic interests yet so often 
he doesn't realize this importance. But a 
coach does know — and he owes it to his boy 
to guide him away from — not toward — con- 
centration on one sport. 

The high school boy who wants to be 
active in athletics all the year around be- 
longs in more than one sport. There is 
plenty of time to specialize after high 
school : university-college level of competi- 
tion virtually decrees specialization. 

And the high school boy must receive 
guidance from his coach — guidance which 
emphasizes benefits of diver^^ification. 
There's a saying — a sport for every boy, 
and a boy for every sport. To paraphrase — 
a sport for every season but also a season 
for every sport. This is the kind of guidance 
a boy needs. 

—WISCONSIN I. A. A. 

MINUTES OF BOARD MEETING 

(Continued from Page Three) 

ried unanimously. 

There was a discussion concerning whether the 
Board of Control should change the basketball tour- 
nament regulations to provide that the Commissioner 
shall appoint district and/or regional tournament offi- 
cials, or if the present plan of selecting these officials 
should be retained. The Commissioner was directed to 
poll K.H.S.A.A. member school principals on this ques- 
tion, with the completed questionnaire to be returned 
to the individual Board members. 



FRANKLIN COUNTY WINNERS 




Cheerleaders of the Franklin County High School won 
first place in the K.A.P.O.S. contest during the 1967 
State High School Basketball Tournament. Members 
of the group in the picture above are (Left to Right) 
Kneeling — Linda Hollan, Sharon Kimbel. Standing — 
Susan Carter, Cheri Thompson, Mrs. Herbert Wedding- 
ton (Sponsor), Jayne Weiler, Linda Mobley. 



The Commissioner recommended that the last 
clause of Basketball Tournament Rule V-B, "and 
these shall be resident Kentucky officials," be deleted. 
Foster J. Sanders moved, .seconded by Oran C. Teater, 
that the tournament rule change recommended by the 
Commissioner be made. The motion was carried 
unanimously. 

The Commissioner read a letter from President 
James Bazzell of the Kentucky High School Coaches 
Association, giving certain suggestions which had been 
made by his Executive Board concerning a possible 
change in the method of selecting State Basketball 
Tournament officials. The Commissioner stated that, 
as he interpreted basketball tournament regulations, 
he had the authority to make the decision concerning 
the method of selecting state tournament officials, but 
that he had in the past asked for the assistance of 
Board members in setting up the selection plan, and 
that he would continue to do so. The Board discussed 
some modifications in the present selection plan which 
might be made for the 1968 tournament, but took no 
action this time concerning the matter. 

Oran C. Teater moved, seconded by Don Davis, 
that the annual salaries of the Commissioner and 
Assistant Commissioner each be raised in the amount 
of $500.00 for the 1967-68 Association fiscal year. The 
motion was carried unanimously. 

Preston Holland moved, seconded by Foster J. 
Sanders, that all bills of the Association for the period 
begmning March 1, 19S7, and ending March 31, 1967, 
be cdlowed. The motion was carried unanimously. 

There being no further business, the meeting 
adjourned. 



ANNOUNCING FOR 1967-68 

The Same Excellent 
Student Accident Coverage 

$8,000 MAXIMUM 

PLUS: Optional 24 Hour Plan 

For Students And Faculty 

PLUS: Cooperative or Regular 
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*7<4e K^4Ufd^4^ Ca4HfiaM4f>G^'i^^'RAh agent 

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Life Department 

121-123 LAFAYETTE AVENUE LEXINGTON, KY. 40502 PHONE 254^095 

P. O. BOX 7100 



Order Your Football Equipment Now 
For Early August Delivery 



PLACE YOUR ORDERS AT ONCE 

We will be very happy to accept your order now for any football 
equipment, as well as basketball equipment. Shipment will be made at the 
earliest possible moment and October 1, 1967 dating will be extended. We 
have nationally advertised brands — complete team equipment, so let us 
take care of your needs. We'll be glad to be of service, whether you need 
complete team equipment or just a few special items. 

We can also make immediate shipment on any Spring merchandise 
you might need. 

ATHLETIC EQUIPMENT FOR YOUR SUMMER 
PLAYGROUND PROGRAMS 

If you plan to have baseball in connection with your recreation pro- 
gram, we have a complete stock of uniforms, shoes, bats, balls and gloves 
in Little League, Babe Ruth League and regulation sizes. 

Please write or call for complete information and prices, and our 
salesmen will be glad to call or give you any information and assistance 
you may need. 

If you need personal vacation equipment, remember that we have a 
complete stock of golf and fishing supplies, so let us hear from. you. 

HUNT'S ATHLETIC GOODS CO, Inc. 

CH 7-1941 — PHONES — CH 7-1942 
MAYFIELD, KENTUCKY 

We ShipThp DaV You BuV^ 










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